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15

Only the number of special attacks is limited Note the last paragraph of the Unwavering Mark feature (XGtE, p. 30): Regardless of the number of creatures you mark, you can make this special attack a number of times equal to your Strength modifier (minimum of once), and you regain all expended uses of it when you finish a long rest. This means that the ...


15

By itself, Mark is a slight buff to the party's melee combatants (but also to the GM's melee combatants), and a slight annoyance to ranged combatants. Having advantage on opportunity attacks makes being in close quarters more of a threat, and increases the necessity of the Disengage action, especially for characters who don't want to be in melee range. It ...


13

There is no rule limiting the number of targets an individual can have marked at any given time. A number of abilities, including the Warden's basic mark ability Nature's Wrath, explicitly state the possibility of marking multiple targets: a warden can mark each adjacent enemy until the end of the warden's next turn. Marks from multiple sources are no ...


11

Marked is a condition in 4e. It can be applied by most Defender classes, and is how they're able to "defend". The definition for the Marked condition includes the following: The creature takes a -2 penalty to attack rolls for any attack that doesn’t include the marking creature as a target. (Player's Handbook, p. 277) This means that the Warden's ...


11

No, a creature can only be marked by one opponent at a time. From the Rules Compendium, p232 (emphasis mine): Marked The creature takes a -2 penalty to attack rolls for any attack that doesn't include the marking creature as a target. A creature can be subjected to only one mark at a time, and a new mark supersedes an old one. A mark ends immediately when ...


9

It depends on the class Different classes use marks in different ways, some having generic marks, and some having special, named marks. For example, Paladins have not just one, but two named marks, Divine Challenge and Divine Sanction, which have additional features beyond generic marks. Swordmage Aegis marks are indeed special marks with extra features ...


8

The mark from a Battlemind's Demand is long lasting and has no range limit after it has been established. Your understanding is correct. There is no requirement for a Battlemind to attack or stay close to the marked target in order to maintain the mark. However, the Battlemind punishment options are only significant if you keep the marked enemy close. An ...


7

To another use of Unwavering Mark. The 5th edition doesn't have a Mark category of abilities like the 4th edition. If that was applicable would be written on the ability itself since there is no general guidelines. A DM could rule that the Mark could end if another character with a similar ability like the UA Knight's Implacable Mark, but that would not be ...


7

Yes, you can have both effects apply to one enemy. Oath of Enmity does not mark the opponent. The only spells that mark an opponent are those that explicitly say they do so. For instance, Divine Challenge explicitly states "You mark the target." If it clears things up: marking is a condition, just like dazed, slowed and blinded are - not a kind of power. ...


7

Yes! The fighter's combat challenge is triggered when a marked enemy attacks an ally (and you are also not included in the attack). Since this interrupts that attack and retargets it, your combat challenge can trigger.


5

The text seem to be self explanatory. Except it's specifically noted that it works like the fighter mark, it's supposed to mean literally what it says and apply even when the attack includes you as a target (we can see the combat challenge feature description here). I'll ellaborate each case: Monster at the top of the screen attacks character C with ...


4

You were right. Only an Interrupt can invalidate its trigger. The character that created the mark was unconscious for a split second. Had the power been a Interrupt, they would be right.


4

Yes, the penalties stack. Bonuses and penalties of the same type do not stack. Untyped bonuses and penalties from the same source do not stack. Divine Challenge/Sanction gives an untyped -2 penalty on attack rolls for attacks that do not include you. Righteous Challenge gives an untyped -2 penalty on attack rolls by targets marked by your DC/DS. Both ...


3

Divine Challenge works with Guardian's Counter, but most other non-Essentials mark punishment abilities don't. From the PHB, p91: Divine Challenge ... While a target is marked ... it takes radiant damage equal to 3 + your Charisma modifier the first time it makes an attack that doesn't include you as a target before the start of your next turn. ... ...


3

That combo appears to work by RAW. From the PHB, p76 (emphasis mine): Combat Challenge ... Every time you attack an enemy, whether the attack hits or misses, you can choose to mark that target. ... Every time you attack an enemy, you get to mark them. From MP2, p143 (emphasis mine): Tactical Superiority Whenever you hit an enemy marked by you with an ...


3

They work similarly but are different mechanics The Marked condition says: Marked is a condition. You take a −2 penalty to attack rolls for any attack that doesn't target the creature that marked you. You can be subjected only to one mark at a time. Newer marks supersede older ones. A mark ends when its creator dies or is unconscious. While Hunter's ...


3

They can both mark the same target simultaneously Since these are two separate features, there's nothing to say that they can't both be active if two PCs use their marks on the same target. In fact, since one is a class feature and one is a spell, it would even be possible for the same PC to have both things simultaneously active against the same enemy if ...


2

Yes. You may make this special opportunity attack against a marked opponent that does not cost your reaction even if you have spent your reaction. Having already spent your reaction does not "prevent you from taking reactions." It just means you have nothing to spend. This wording is meant to restrict this free opportunity attack to those times when you ...


2

In your case, no. The ability for you to to make your Aegis Assault attack is listed as an effect of your Aegis of Assault that comes after the marking action. If the target was not marked by the Aegis, then it isn't vulnerable to the Aegis attack granted as part of the marking power. The Aegis says "your marked target" as opposed to the fighter's Combat ...


2

Yes. Your Divine Sanction will override your Divine Challenge. From the Divine Challenge entry in the PHB, on pg. 91: A creature can be subject to only one mark at a time. A new mark supersedes a mark that was already in place. On pg. 82 of Divine Power, the Divine Sanction section reads: Unless otherwise noted, the mark ends before the specified duration ...


2

To first answer the headline question, this works differently than a mark as it does not last until the end of the encounter or death of the creature, etc. Generally, Marks last until you die, the creature dies or are removed by some other instance, unlike the conditional of Glowering Threat which falls off after your next turn. Nothing that I can find in ...


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