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52

Jeremy Crawford deemed it to not work So, a few minutes after I posted this question, I found some information from Jeremy Crawford which explained how it didn't work. One of his answers here says that it says "a Medium creature", which does not include creatures on top of other creatures: Twitter user: Just so you know, the #DND hive mind has already ...


45

No. The Amazing Light Speed Horse™ cannot move an infinite distance (And what distance it does move without taking the dash action is at a speed of at most movement per round, and with the dash action is 2×movement per round.) Per the definition of movement from the Basic Rules v 0.3, page 63, and also from the Player's Handbook, page 181: Every ...


43

Yes, if your DM thinks a panther has the right anatomy. The gnome is Small (PHB 37) and the panther Medium (PHB 308). The relevant rule says: A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount (PHB 198) Your ranger's animal companion is certainly willing. It does depend on whether your ...


42

Yes A horse is a creature just as a player character is (see this Q&A). Thus, a horse can benefit from goodberry with no issues. If the spell was intended to be restricted to certain creature types (humanoids, for example) the spell would say so. It is worth noting that goodberry is apparently not intended to provide water according to Jeremy ...


42

There are no rules, but Int 3 seems like a dividing line in 5e The following spells seem to treat Int 3 or less as unintelligent: Animal Messenger: "If the beast's Intelligence is 4 or higher, the spell fails. " Awaken: "must have either no Intelligence score or an Intelligence of 3 or less" Detect Thoughts: "If the creature you choose has an Intelligence ...


36

The game benefits to having a mount in-game are the same as the real-life benefits of having a mount. You can carry much more at a normal pace with a mount. A riding horse's carrying capacity is 480lb; a 15-strength PC's unencumbered1 carrying capacity is 75lb. You can move faster in short bursts with a mount. A mount can gallop, moving at double-pace, for ...


32

In D&D 5e, the daily rate of mounted overland travel is generally the same as on foot, because horses get tired and adventurers carry a lot of heavy equipment. That said, some more detailed rules on travel speed are covered under Special Travel Pace (DMG p. 242–243): In 1 hour, you can move a number of miles equal to your speed divided by 10. ...


30

Firstly that's not what it means. All mounts can be allowed to act independently. The dumbest horse in the universe doesn't need someone to tell it what to do, and can act independently, without needing orders to walk around, eat, etc. All mounts can act independently. However, “[i]ntelligent creatures […] act independently” — always. You can't control a ...


29

As far as I can tell, rules are scarce on this subject. All we have is: PHB, Chapter 5, page 144: (on wearing armor, in general) Armor Proficiency. Anyone can put on a suit of armor or strap a shield to an arm. Only those proficient in the armor’s use know how to wear it effectively, however. Your class gives you proficiency with certain types of ...


29

Yes, a player should know their mount's exact HP. It's so clear-cut that even if the rules clearly said otherwise, you would want to override them to work differently. I have never yet seen a DM with enough bandwidth to manage all the things which they already need to keep track of (myself included) and every addition to that reduces the quality of DMing ...


29

The most relevant parts of the find steed spell are (my emphasis): ... unusually intelligent, strong, and loyal steed, creating a long-lasting bond with it. Your steed serves you as a mount, both in combat and out, and you have an instinctive bond with it that allows you to fight as a seamless unit. While your steed is within 1 mile of you, you ...


29

Yes, as long as the mount is within 5 feet An ally is not clearly defined in 5e, so we can use the English definition: a person, group, or nation that is associated with another or others for some common cause or purpose Ally in the case of D&D 5e is almost certainly meant to include animals since wolves get the Pack Tactics trait too so we just ...


29

Find Greater Steed generally provides more powerful creatures Below is a table showcasing the creatures that can be summoned by each spell. \begin{array}{|l|l|l|l|l|l|} \hline \textit{Find Steed} \\ \hline \textbf{Name} & \textbf{CR} & \textbf{HP} & \textbf{Speed} & \textbf{Attack(s)} & \textbf{Special} \\ \hline \text{Warhorse} & ...


27

Sure, a giant spider can be a mount. Here is what the Player's Handbook says about the eligibility of a mount in the Mounted Combat section (p. 198): A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount. The giant spider is Large size, and humanoids are Medium size, so the size restriction ...


26

Note up-front that allowing PC to ride another PC is already up to DM discretion as to whether the PC (the dragonborn in the case) has the "appropriate anatomy" to be a mount. Playing around with this can allow fun things like your gnome/dragonborn duo but also things like centaur stacks. The rules also clearly are not written to handle mounted stacks. But I ...


25

As far as I am aware, there is no way to give a creature the incapacitated condition directly. However, there are 4 conditions that give a creature the incapacitated condition as part of their effects. These are: Paralysed Petrified Stunned Unconscious There are a number of ways to apply these conditions without damaging your beloved pet. Within the ...


25

An up-sized Rhinoceros seems pretty fitting. Rhinos are tough and beefy, famously ill-tempered, short sighted and love charging into battle and running over everything that gets in their way.


24

With the extremely obscure feat: "Mighty Steed". Found in the mount handbook, the handbook states: Mighty Steed: A feat found in the Dragonlance supplements Bestiary of Krynn and Knightly Orders of Ansalon. A mount with this feat counts as one size category larger for determining carrying capacity and the minimum size of its rider. That is, it lets a ...


24

Find steed is intended to give different options than find greater steed First, some unofficial guidance per Jeremy Crawford, lead rules designer: Q: The Find Greater Steed kind of bugs me because 5E has so far explicitly avoided 'greater' spells and allowed people to beef up spells by spending larger spell slots. So why is Find Greater Steed it's ...


22

In a recent Dragon Talk titled Sage Advice on Mounted Combat Jeremy Crawford explained the intended rules, which are that the Paladin can choose: The spell says that you and the steed fight as a cohesive unit and you can communicate with it and it serves you. Really what that means is, it is up to you [...] whether to control it or let it act ...


22

Yes Player's Handbook, p. 198: A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount using the following rules. However, there are limitations: 1. The DM has to say yes It's undefined what is an "appropriate" anatomy, leaving that judgement up to the DM. It doesn't say they have to be a ...


21

Officially, probably not... There are no precise limits provided that state exactly under what circumstances an item is attended, except that the item be "grasped, touched, or worn" (PH 166), and attending an item is the usual bar for determining whether an effect that affects only a creature also affects that creature's gear. (Further, attending an item ...


21

No, it doesn't Firstly it's against the spirit of the rule, which is to allow humanoids to become invisible with all their gear, so they don't give themselves away by a floating sword. Secondly, it's against the letter of the rule. anything - not anyone on the target's person - a rider can hardly be said to be on a horse's person


21

Yes, you can mount your Druid friend The rules for Mounts indicate that a willing creature at least one size category larger than you, with appropriate anatomy, can serve as a mount. A horse is obviously an acceptable mount, so a Druid Wildshaped into a horse is acceptable, so long as he is willing. Do note that, because the Druid is intelligent, it must ...


20

No, a controlled mount acts on its own turn (adjacent to the rider's) Initiative determines the order of turns during combat. [...] The DM ranks the combatants in order from the one with the highest Dexterity check total to the one with the lowest. This is the order (called the initiative order) in which they act during each round. The PHB describes the ...


20

Describe it differently The crux of this seems to be "Wonder Woman's Invisible Jet is silly," which is an issue with the fiction the rules inspire. I agree, it's a pretty silly thing to have to imagine. In this case, though, let's ask ourselves the question: do I have to imagine it that way? We're talking about a beast that blends with darkness and shadow, ...


20

While Not Mounted Jeremy Crawford settled this issue on Twitter. The answer is: While ridden, the steed follows the normal mounted combat rules (PH, 198). Unridden, it has normal action options. So, RAW it should have its own initiative count (like familiars and the revised ranger companion, and other unridden mounts) and would be able to take any/all ...


19

can I cast Fly on my horse? It's a creature and so is a valid target. Can it be considered a willing creature? Probably; its willing to let you climb on its back, however, your DM has the final call on this. See Can you make an unwilling creature willing? In other words, what defines “willing”? If so, will I be able to ride it while flying? Sure, ...


17

What this question ultimately comes down to is these two questions: Can your mount fit into the dungeon with you on it and successfully navigate the dungeon's terrain? How long are you willing to wait to recover your mount if it is killed? Due to the cast time on this spell (10 minutes) it is fairly normal for a Paladin to keep their mount summoned. You don'...


17

One Character, One Creature My player considers his lower body to be the mount while his upper body as the rider. The player is fishing for benefits where none are provided by the rules. A centaur is a single creature. He is not his own mount, and there is nothing in the rules to support this "consideration". Ruling in this player's favor gives him more ...


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