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37

This does not work. The spell Find Steed allows you to cast a spell and have it also affect your steed. While mounted on your steed, you can make any spell you cast that targets only you also target your steed. In the targets section of the PHB, it states: A spell's description tells you whether the spell targets creatures, objects, or a point ...


29

Find Greater Steed generally provides more powerful creatures Below is a table showcasing the creatures that can be summoned by each spell. \begin{array}{|l|l|l|l|l|l|} \hline \textit{Find Steed} \\ \hline \textbf{Name} & \textbf{CR} & \textbf{HP} & \textbf{Speed} & \textbf{Attack(s)} & \textbf{Special} \\ \hline \text{Warhorse} & ...


18

A creature is only considered mounted if it is riding something The rules for mounted combat (Player's Handbook, p. 198) say: A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount, using the following rules. So, the centaur is not considered mounted if it isn't riding something. His racial ...


18

find familiar (likely) does not target the caster, and so it only summons one familiar Under the Targets section it states: A spell's description tells you whether the spell targets creatures, objects, or a point of origin for an area of effect... And under the Range section it states: The target of a spell must be within the spell's range... ...


13

No, you cannot control it like any other mount If we presuppose that you can use it as a mount at all, the list of restrictions on the hound is extensive and precludes a lot of what mounts are useful for: [...] It can move through other creatures and objects as if they were difficult terrain. The hound takes 5 force damage if it ends its turn ...


11

A Flying Broom doesn't meet the requirements to be a mount under 5e: A knight charging into battle on a warhorse, a wizard casting spells from the back of a griffon, or a cleric soaring through the sky on a pegasus all enjoy the benefits of speed and mobility that a mount can provide. A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that ...


10

Not unless the DM rules that the intended mount has "an appropriate anatomy" The rules on mounted combat state (emphasis mine): A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount, using the following rules. Now, finding a creature that's at least one size larger is pretty easy. The ...


10

The creature that is hit has its speed reduced to 0 If a creature with Mounted Combatant uses that to make themselves the target then their speed becomes 0 and the mount is unaffected. A rider is not using its movement, the mount is, so it is free to keep moving and carrying its rider with it. The rider has its speed set to 0 so it cannot move, so it cannot ...


9

A Giant Wolf Spider can climb upside down while being mounted. The Giant Wolf Spider (MM 330): Spider Climb. The spider can climb difficult surfaces, including upside down on ceilings, without needing to make an ability check. Doesn't have to make ability checks. If you are curious about whether the rider makes ability checks, you may find guidance here....


9

A druidic animal companion horse Your cavalier gets neither the light horse or the heavy horse as a mount; the cavalier's special feature states that: This mount functions as a druid’s animal companion, using the cavalier’s level as his effective druid level. Thus, we refer to the rules for the druid's animal companion, which has its own list of ...


8

Technically speaking, no. Mounted is a specific situation, and you don't count as mounted unless you are actually mounted or have a special ability that says you count as mounted. A DM might decide to allow this. However, if they do, the lance becomes by far the best weapon for a centaur. It has weaknesses (in the disadvantage for fighting within 5 feet), ...


8

Summoning spells do not have a sole target of the spellcaster As has been discussed to exhaustion on this site, both in posts and in chat, the nature of a "target", with respect to spellcasting in 5th edition D&D, is a very finicky and fragile concept that, in general, should not be receiving a lot of time being thought about. So I can certainly ...


8

Imagine a small character riding a panther. The panther runs 15m and the rider shoots an arrow at a target or uses a lance to hit a target 10m away. The panther moves another 5m and pounces. RAW, this can only happen with a readied action and an independent mount. If the panther is controlled by the character, the panther is unable to take actions other ...


8

It will fade over 1 minute. The spell says "The spell ends if you use an action to dismiss it or if the steed takes any damage." and "When the spell ends, the steed gradually fades, giving the rider 1 minute to dismount." No, once the spell ends its effects end to. The fading is an extra effect that lasts 1 minute, this does not extend any other effects. Yes,...


6

Yes, but.... So long as neither the caster not any of the other 9 creatures is large (or larger) Tiny Hut doesn't fail: Nine creatures of Medium size or smaller can fit inside the dome with you. The spell fails if its area includes a larger creature or more than nine creatures. However, Find Steed doesn't allow you to "copy" spells. It allows you to ...


6

There isn’t any system you can use, or formula you can check. You have to just create a new monster, assigning all its stats and abilities, and then you have to figure out how it’s accessed as a mount (e.g. what effective druid level you should have before you can get it as an animal companion, what effective paladin level you should have before you can get ...


6

It doesn't break anything, but it is a misuse of the spell level Allowing a flying steed for Find Steed breaks the balance of the 4th Level Find Greater Steed. A Paladin has to wait until 13th Level to get Find Greater Steed, but in this case they get the flying aspect at 5th Level. It isn't any more broken than giving the Paladin a Broom of Flying at ...


5

When you mount it The initiative of a controlled mount changes to match yours when you mount it. The choice of if it will be controlled or independent happens when you mount it. To change that you need to dismount and remount which takes your entire movement (half to dismount, half to remount) so it's not much of an impediment because, while mounted, you ...


5

A typical rider gains no inherent mechanical benefit from standing on a mount I've tried many times to make sense of mounted combat in Dungeons & Dragons 3.5. I've read several books about it like this one and this one. I make frequent use of articles like this one and its sequels (see here and here). I've gone so far as to attempt to rewrite from ...


5

Yes... kind of. The description for the Nightmare from the MM (p. 235) states: A nightmare can be summoned from the Lower Planes, but unless a worthy sacrifice is offered to it as food upon its arrival, the nightmare displays no special loyalty to the creature it serves. This tells me that if a good aligned character makes a sufficient offering to the ...


5

Dispel magic causes it to fade; antimagic field causes it to immediately disappear while it's in the field's area. Dispel magic ends spells: Choose any creature, object, or magical effect within range. Any spell of 3rd level or lower on the target ends. Ending the spell will cause the steed to fade out over 1 minute. Antimagic field is different: it ...


5

Mounts can be slowed by the rider's total weight. The rider's armor itself does not slow down their mount. At least, not in the same way that wearing medium or heavy armor reduces a character's movement speed. However, wearing medium or heavy armor adds weight to the rider. If the total weight of the rider, their armor, their gear, saddle, barding, etc is ...


4

While the 3.5 revision did make things easier on the paladin—reducing the wait time to get a new special mount after a special mount dies from Third Edition's a year and a day (like a Third Edition and 3.5 familiar) to merely 30 days—, so far as I can tell, the game has no provision for getting back the same slain special mount in less than 30 days. I've ...


4

The Complete Paladin's Handbook by Rick Swan provides the information you seek. Some example exotic mounts are: unicorns, pegasi, griffons, giant eagles, elephants, lions, tigers, dire wolves, hippocampi, dolphins. There are also others; and DM's choice is also left out as an open-ended option. The book also recommends establishing rules for such exotic ...


4

First of all: Triceratops is a Huge beast, not Medium (MM 80). If it actually was Medium, then only Small and Tiny creatures could mount it. PHB 198: A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount A rider and his mount are still considered different creatures and retain their ...


4

No ordinary case exactly covers the Broom of Flying, but the most reasonable approximation is to grant a flying speed. Is the broom a mount? By an reasonable interpretation of the Mounted Combat rules, no. To be covered by those rules, a mount must be "A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you" (PHB p.198.) The broom of flying fulfills ...


3

You ignore all penalties specifically associated with riding It is far from being crystal clear, but relevant part probably means The character takes no [i.e. ignores] penalties [induced by the process of riding only, not each and every, obviously] to actions while doing so. clarifications mine Penalties which come from riding are: -5 penalties for ...


3

As written, you get a skeletal war pony if you are Small, and a skeletal heavy warhorse otherwise (including if you are smaller than Small). The feature grants you access to a “skeletal steed,” and then defines it as precisely those two things and nothing else. This is, yes, pretty useless; the paladin special mount is a pretty good feature, and the skeletal ...


3

No, it doesn't. The rule you quoted is the only change to initiative that is specified. If you dismount, the mount can keep its current initiative value, which is the same as yours. Its turn would be either before or after the dismounted character's turn. I would decide based on what actions either of them have already taken. For example, if the character ...


3

Yes if the mount is an intelligent ally. Otherwise no. There isn't a hard and fast rule for this, since the rules for building combat encounters are just guidelines to begin with. With that said, I think the important question here is whether the mount is simply a tool that the player uses to enhance their movement, or an intelligent ally who will move, ...


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