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61

Short simple answer here. No you can't, you can only mount or dismount once per turn. Player's Handbook, page 198: Mounting and Dismounting Once during your move, you can mount a creature that is within 5 feet of you or dismount.


39

This question is an example of how a DM should deal the concept of Rules Lawyer vs Playability in the game. Given the way the rules are written, there's a loophole that can be exploited. Yes, it's possible to string those actions together. However, logically, take a minute to think about what you ask. In a round (which is 6 seconds), can you: move 120', ...


37

I would say no. The PHB on page 195 specifically states: you don't provoke attacks of opportunity when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction. Under the Beast Master archetype on page 93 it says: You can command the beast where to move on your turn (no action required). Since the beast counts as something ...


35

The game benefits to having a mount in-game are the same as the real-life benefits of having a mount. You can carry much more at a normal pace with a mount. A riding horse's carrying capacity is 480lb; a 15-strength PC's unencumbered1 carrying capacity is 75lb. You can move faster in short bursts with a mount. A mount can gallop, moving at double-pace, for ...


29

Yes, as long as the mount is within 5 feet An ally is not clearly defined in 5e, so we can use the English definition: a person, group, or nation that is associated with another or others for some common cause or purpose Ally in the case of D&D 5e is almost certainly meant to include animals since wolves get the Pack Tactics trait too so we just ...


28

By the rules, the DM controls. But, in every case I've ever seen this happen at the table, the DM has enough going on that they just delegate this to the player. This usually comes with the understanding that the player will keep the creature's actions reasonable for its intelligence and training, and not hog table time from other players. That's either ...


27

I'd say that this is against the spirit of the rules and an exploit, and disallow it. Don't forget that the DM has much more opportunity to exploit the rules than you do, and if you're playing strictly to the letter then you're gonna run into problems with any system. It highly reminds of of the peasant rail gun, which to quickly summarize: Get roughly ...


27

Enemies get to say which one of you they want to attack. Usually the mount is easier to hit, but killing it doesn't stop the rider from attacking on foot. Attacking the rider is harder, but more effective if successful (especially if the mount decides not to fight on its own). The monster is making a tactically sound decision by attacking you, since you are ...


25

The DM Controls If you are not actively giving orders, then the mount is basically a NPC not under your control and therefore the DM determines it's actions. If you are actively giving orders, then the mount will follow them. You can't choose to NOT give orders AND still control the mount. It needs to be one or the other, or there is no reason to ...


22

Under the Mounted Combat section of the SRD, it states that If the mount provokes an opportunity attack while you're on it, the attacker can target you or the mount. The rules make no mention of monsters being forced to attack one or the other, so they attack at the Dungeon Master's discretion.


22

The benefits of a lance are built into its properties: Lances have the second-highest raw, average damage output of the weapons in the SRD* Lances grant reach, though they also grant disadvantage when attacking targets within 5ft Lances are not two-handed when mounted, making them the only SRD reach weapon that can be wielded alongside a shield other than a ...


22

In a recent Dragon Talk titled Sage Advice on Mounted Combat Jeremy Crawford explained the intended rules, which are that the Paladin can choose: The spell says that you and the steed fight as a cohesive unit and you can communicate with it and it serves you. Really what that means is, it is up to you [...] whether to control it or let it act ...


21

Yes, you can. Also, a lance requires two hands to wield when you aren’t mounted. So as long as you are mounted, you can use a lance in one hand. The Dual Wielder feat allows you to use two-weapon fighting with any one-handed melee weapon, so this works fine. As for the damage die, the damage die for the lance is a d12, and there's nothing in its ...


21

No, the mount acts on its own turn Controlled mount The PHB describes the rules for mounted combat. In them it describes that a controlled mount has an initiative that is the same as the rider's: The initiative of a controlled mount changes to match yours when you mount it. However, this does not mean that they act on the same turn. The mount gets its ...


21

No, it doesn't Firstly it's against the spirit of the rule, which is to allow humanoids to become invisible with all their gear, so they don't give themselves away by a floating sword. Secondly, it's against the letter of the rule. anything - not anyone on the target's person - a rider can hardly be said to be on a horse's person


21

Yes, you can mount your Druid friend The rules for Mounts indicate that a willing creature at least one size category larger than you, with appropriate anatomy, can serve as a mount. A horse is obviously an acceptable mount, so a Druid Wildshaped into a horse is acceptable, so long as he is willing. Do note that, because the Druid is intelligent, it must ...


20

This is one of these questions where James Jacobs overrules RAW with RAI. RAW: No. Reach Weapons: [...] Most reach weapons double the wielder's natural reach, meaning that a typical Small or Medium wielder of such a weapon can attack a creature 10 feet away, but not a creature in an adjacent square. [...] A Tiny monkey's natural reach is 0 ft., double ...


20

No, a controlled mount acts on its own turn (adjacent to the rider's) Initiative determines the order of turns during combat. [...] The DM ranks the combatants in order from the one with the highest Dexterity check total to the one with the lowest. This is the order (called the initiative order) in which they act during each round. The PHB describes the ...


20

Reach is measured from the rider RAW Nothing in the rules says that mounting another creature changes your size. So, according to the most basic reading of the rules, your size simply does not change. There are no secret rules and this is both the simplest and most RAW answer. So that would make the answer to your second question a definitive "no". While ...


19

I am unable to find a specific answer to your question by RAW (maybe somebody else can help), but having a look at a relevant rule may help: PHB 198: If the mount provokes an opportunity attack while you're on it, the attacker can target you or the mount. The way I read that is that if your mount's movement of space (its occupied area) provokes an ...


19

Space Controlled The size is not about physical boundaries the creature occupies, but to area the creature effectively controls. The Size Categories table shows how much space a creature of a particular size controls in combat. Which means, you and the horse are somewhere inside that area. And have control over it. Moreover, it also means that unlike ...


19

Remember that unless the hobgoblin takes an action to hide, you know which square it's in(PHB, 291) and also discussed in this question. Weapon attacks don't, in general, require a visible foe. A number of spells require you to see the target, but a few don't, like Guiding Bolt(PHB, 248), which I bet you have. "But those are rolled with disadvantage, Exal!...


19

Prevent it from going unseen in the first place The most straightforward way of hurting something that is invisible is by preventing it from going invisible in the first place. If the mage is within 60 feet of you when it casts Greater Invisibility, both your Bard and the two Sorcerers can attempt to counterspell him. This is by far the best solution, ...


18

No With some stipulations. First, the PHB on page 198 gives good insight into mounted combat. There are two sections I'd like to call attention to: While you're mounted, you have two options. You can either control the mount or allow it to act independently. Intelligent creatures, such as dragons, act independently. For domesticated mounts, ...


17

What this question ultimately comes down to is these two questions: Can your mount fit into the dungeon with you on it and successfully navigate the dungeon's terrain? How long are you willing to wait to recover your mount if it is killed? Due to the cast time on this spell (10 minutes) it is fairly normal for a Paladin to keep their mount summoned. You don'...


17

Since you speak of NPC lancers, I'm going to assume you need "monsters", or at least adversaries, not player options. In which case, the added power of a monster wielding a Lance or other such weapon is baked into the creature stats, not the general player rules. Check for example the Centaur, Unicorn or Minotaur. They all have a power called Charge which ...


17

One Character, One Creature My player considers his lower body to be the mount while his upper body as the rider. The player is fishing for benefits where none are provided by the rules. A centaur is a single creature. He is not his own mount, and there is nothing in the rules to support this "consideration". Ruling in this player's favor gives him more ...


16

Yes, a mount can attack as it is being ridden From Controlling a Mount (PH 198): You can either control the mount or allow it to act independently. Intelligent creatures, such as dragons, act independently. (Similar wording appears in the Player's Basic Rules on p77, under the Controlling a Mount section.) These are 2 separate sentences. The first ...


16

We had a similar discussion in one of my groups and we agreed to the GM’s explanation of how he chooses the target on behalf of creeps and NPCs: Pretty much all sentient beings attack the target first that they perceive as the biggest danger for whatever reason (if they chose to attack at all). A better explanation would be, that they try to eliminate the ...


16

A creature is only considered mounted if it is riding something The rules for mounted combat (Player's Handbook, p. 198) say: A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount, using the following rules. So, the centaur is not considered mounted if it isn't riding something. His racial ...


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