9

Things that I have found that reduce the time in preparing for "Crime" scenes, and preparing scenes that last longer than "go in, find clue, walk out". These are taken from my own experience when running Call of Cthulhu Mind Maps; for any mystery an overview of everything is essential. A simple mind map of how each NPC relates to another with a circle-line ...


7

The number of points you spend on an ability is your rating in it. That's it. It's no more complicated than it seems. There's no spending additional points to "unlock" abilities. Investigative abilities are bought exactly the same way as general abilities, except that you spend from a separate pool of points. (If you did have to waste a point to take an ...


6

Gumshoe relies so heavily on the Investigative/General skill split that I'm going to address them separately. Investigative skills The core of Gumshoe. The points allocation suggested in Mutant City is moderately generous, but this is by design. Gumshoe is expressly about making sure the plot can't stall due to of lack of a relevant skill. The group ...


4

Found it. General Powers If a power is described as ranged, but no specific range is given, that distance varies... with your current pool value in the ability. If it is 3 or less, your range is 25 meters. When your pool is between 4 and 6 it is 50 meters. If your pool is 7 or more, your range is one hundred meters. (Mutant City Blues 38) This does ...


4

It has been a long time since I played a game of GUMSHOE, so I'll try my best. Both of these types of actions involve more than one character, more than one performer of the deed. As you've understood the mechanical difference, let's move to the conceptual one. Piggybacking A piggybacking is an action in which someone performs a deed and all of the other ...


3

I do hope that it is still relevant, or maybe it will just [hopefully] help you in the future, but I've just found this sample online campaign which took place a few years ago. As it seems, it does have a few character sheets within it, so without much further ado here it is: http://codeindigo.livejournal.com/2008/07/05/ There are 2 of the 3 character ...


2

Instead of making a list of clues, make a list of facts that lead to the other scenes of the investigation. Encourage your players to use their abilities in ways that logically get the facts along with other cool things that spends can get.


1

GUMSHOE games typically say that a rating of 1 in an Investigative skill is enough to show the character is competent in that field. A rating of 2 indicates a professional, and a rating of 3 is expert. There is probably no reason to get a rating of 4 in anything but Languages (for when you want someone like Indiana Jones). And all Abilities are purchased on ...


1

Can I just suggest GURPS:Mysteries as an answer to this question? It has like two chapters of advice on very similar things (mystery adventure design generally, not specific to Gumshoe/MCB). Not all of it is specifically geared to reducing prep required for PCs shaping the investigation, but some of it will help (there are tips on information management and ...


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