35

The best way I ever dealt with this is by enlisting the player's help. Explain the problem to them and ask them how they (and yourself) could work how to alleviate the perceived problem. Why perceived problem? Do the other players mind? If not, you are trying to solve an imaginary problem. Did you ask them? Is everyone on the same page about the game they ...


35

Actually, the master don't have to be better at everything. For example he may have been targeted by a curse which makes him unable to use magic/less good at combat. Maybe despite all his years of experience he remained very socially awkward and the apprentice will have to do most of the social interactions with NPCs. Maybe the apprentice has a special gift ...


24

The assumption that the master is better in everything because he is the master is false. The master is better in the relevant aspects of his craft. There is no need to weaken him, simply make the pair face challenges a bit outside the craft. A master witcher will be better with the sword and will know more about monsters and magic, but being feared and ...


23

There is a rule that covers this It's on page 6 of the Player's Handbook and it is the general rule of D&D 5e which all other rules are merely specific instances of. It says, in summary: The DM describes the environment. The players describe what they want to do. The DM narrates the results of the adventurers’ actions. "... describe what they want to ...


11

I'd mirror a lot of what has already been said on this, but but the main thing you need to do first is find out what your players really think and feel about the bard taking a lead. If they are enjoying the game then I wouldn't focus too much of your time on trying to fix something they don't see as broken. I'd suggest speaking to them all out of the game to ...


10

Master and apprentice is a popular scheme. Whether it's Jedi or medieval knights, stories are full of those pairs. Obviously the master is better in whatever he is a master in. On the other side he has sacrificed something to get there. Most popular (probably because very realistic) is that he sacrificed time. The master is no 20 year old healthy guy, he's ...


10

Use a push-to-talk service that indicates to other players when you're broadcasting. I participate in a similar kind of game, where one of our players can't be in the room with use and can only use voice. We've dealt with essentially the same problem; it's almost impossible to tell when our remote player wants to speak up, especially when we can read ...


9

The biggest problem you may have is that players simply do not know what to do and don't know where to start. 0- Make sure your players know that this is your goal with the campaign. Don't spring this on them (don't do like I did). 1- Present the NPC and feature interaction with them. Not just "Hi! I'm Bob, I'm your cousin blacksmith, do you want a sword?...


9

In my experience, this type of problem arises from approaching something as if it was black and white and can be solved by instead treating it as a spectrum or more complex topic. In this case, perhaps the magic-detecting ability this character has learned or was born with is unable to detect some magic. The character may have been able to easily detect all ...


8

Session Zero is supposed to help with this Short summary: A "Session zero" is there to help get players and the DM on the same page for character designs, what the campaign is about, house rules, and other such matters. More on that in the link or a quick search online. That doesn't help me? Well, when your Player says "Hey I want to maximize my Undead ...


7

Borrow ideas tested in non-gaming systems. Radio. While it will feel awkward at first, using a bit of CB (Citizen Band) radio jargon might be useful. By that, I mean when you're speaking you end your "turn" at speaking with a clear end-of-message flag, "[...]. Over!" Just to clear the airwaves and let the next person start up. Having used CB radios back in ...


7

I don't know of any system like you describe. I wouldn’t really want one, myself. But what I do have, and use, is this: A quick and easy improvement on voting: voting against With thanks to CGP Grey, a really quick, simple, easy mechanism for voting on what to do is to have everyone vote against things they really don’t want. That way no one is really ...


6

Is it a problem? Everyone takes their pleasure from the game in their own way. The guy with the vacant look on their face who says 5 syllables every session may see the game as the highlight of their week. By all means solicit feedback from each player individually about this issue (among others) but don’t phrase it as a problem until it is a problem. “Hey,...


6

I imagine that the answers to this question will largely be subjective, but I'll try to be thorough. My examples will be based on Pathfinder, since that's the system I know, but the spirit of my answer should be true for all RPGs. The Facts You, as a GM, are only required to make the game fun for your players (I believe you're required to do your part in ...


5

You have various options Introduce the new character as being an old friend of the leaving character. The leaving character feels bad about abandoning the party in their hour of need and hands their magical items over to their replacement. This would only be helpful if they can use the items of course. Alternately, let the new character have their own ...


4

As you use Roll20 for visuals anyway, I would try to introduce specific text chat tags. You can use them IC or OOC and players can emphasize their need to speak next like: [very upset, barely can keep her composure] or how they are willing to not engage [grabs some crackers from the backpack and watches people argue] This also helps the other players to ...


4

As others have pointed out, first make sure it is actually a problem. If all your players are having fun, and you are too, there may be nothing that needs fixing. As others have already suggested solutions for your current campaign, I'd like to share a solution that worked really well for our group when we started a new campaign. In our group we have one ...


3

There are, in my view, two main issues you’re dealing with which are quite similar to issues that have bothered me. First one is steering them in a direction. I think you’ve done most of the hard work to put in the clues and different ways for them to get them. As a last resort and while not being the most elegant of solutions, I sometimes borrow the Idea ...


3

I have a few hundred hours of GM experience through voice-chat, and this is something that tends to pop-up in new or ad-hoc groups fairly often. The loud and boisterous players/ the face character grabs all the talking roleplay, and the others have little to do but roll. The solutions I generally apply are the following: Stay In-Character: Try to keep ...


3

I'll start a bit from afar. If I remember psychology of Witchers correctly they are a set of ideologically and socially motivated specialists who strive to produce effective result. If this model is correct then cultural reason for Master to have Apprentice would be one of these two: Help. In real-world trades of martial arts and survival trades Master + ...


3

Master being better than the apprentice is not inherently bad. I will expand one point of Anne's answer that I find extremely important. The master wants his apprentice to become better, so he won't do everything for him, even if he is more qualified. This allows for a lot of situations which do not arise in the conventional "all-players-are-equal" ...


3

It is normal for players to be paranoid especially with a GM that is trying to make an open ended game as literally anything can turn out to be a story hook. The thing to beware of is having your players feel like they haven't found everything they could use to their advantage. As a GM i tend to place a non combatant assistant next to my PC's. A smart person ...


3

It seems that you have your players trained to expect events to be bad things. That leads to player/character paranoia. If so, you should be concerned. Try to have events that are opportunities. This is very easy with my group as they will try to turn any event into an opportunity (e.g. "Nails & Scales / Every Dragon should look their Best"). I like ...


2

This reminds me of the old times, playing The Dark Eye as elves. They don't have magic detecting abilities, but they had the part of ultra good senses, that made it absurdly difficult to hide things from them. On the other hand, they had to make checks of throwing up from disgusting stuff, especially some monsters. What I want to say is, use his abilities ...


2

If you can, talk to the player outside of the game and try to work out a compromise I guess? If you can't come to an agreement then you might need to drastically change your plans.


2

Two notions pop into my head: 1) If this ability exists for one, then it exists across the board. Throw in a bad guy or two with the exact same ability to detect magic. You certainly wouldn't want to overdo this, but that first plot where the players are flabbergasted that their super-de-dooper stealth approach utterly failed to surprise the enemy will ...


2

There's a lot to break down here, so forgive me if I misunderstood something. It seems like all you want is for 25% of the group to get their way 25% of the time. Each player gets an "I choose" token Let us have players A1, A2, C, D. Players A1 and A2 agree on voting, for this purpose C and D disagree with everyone. The party travels down a road, which ...


2

Ask your GM! Har har, funny joke. But seriously, what's going to come next are just guidelines. Even Crafts (basket weaving) +4 is going to result in a spotlight imbalance if you decide that every man, woman, child, or unknowable terror from space is susceptible to a lovingly-made basket of condolence cheeses. There'll be some more advice at the end, but ...


2

Generally speaking, you might have to check whether your expectations and those of your players actually match. For example by using the same page tool. So find a way to express your dissatisfaction and ask whether your players have fun, and how you could find common grounds. Now, about the particular problem you're describing, there's an easy fix. If they ...


1

It sounds like you have a tricky player/character with a lot of energy and enthusiasm. Telling a story with the kind of character you described can be difficult, but it sounds like you're pretty happy with the character and are just struggling with molding the setting. For a character that's so chaotic, you should use their unpredictability as a ...


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