61

As these are all new players, there's nothing wrong with a bit of "out-of-game" DM guidance at these early stages. After describing the situation you can simply say: "What you do now is your choice. You can attempt to calm the situation, shout at the attackers, fetch help, attack or something else!" Then ask each player: What do you do? You can even ...


39

"The way you are playing your character is ticking us off because ..." Explain the behavior that you (as a group) find annoying. Explain where you think the boundaries should be drawn. Ask for feedback. Get (or fail to get) consensus. Play with (or exclude) this player. Unless you tell people to stop picking their nose, they will keep picking their nose.


38

What This Might Be: This is a fine distinction to make, but I think the issue is less that the player can't picture the in-game situation, so much as that the player is drawing drastically different inferences from the situation-- different enough from yours that you can't effectively plan around them, different enough from the players' that they find him (...


34

I think that if your players say that they learn by doing then it is a good idea to listen to them. Otherwise you will just end up banging your head against a brick wall. The dynamic of every table playing a campaign is different and, as their DM, it is your role to set things up to make the game enjoyable - without neglecting your own sanity of course! ...


27

There are always only three general approaches, here: Let the game world grind them down Let the other PCs intervene, IC Intervene yourself, with or without the players, OOC It sounds like you've effectively done the second already, if they've confiscated their weapons-- that's a pretty drastic step to take! It also sets the stage very nicely for the ...


19

What you're facing is one of the hardest problems to tackle as a DM, and probably one of the harder lessons that any teacher must face in their career. That problem being the balance between shielding them from failure and letting them learn from their mistakes. On the one hand, you want your players to have fun, and you want to create an interesting ...


15

Dont allow a free action to return the weapons at the beginning of a fight This probably isn't a complete solution, but by allowing this small exception to the rules, you're undermining your other players. Stick to the rules. The Player Character holding them can drop them as their free object interaction without affecting the rest of their turn, which ...


15

I ran tabletop games for new players at a local game store for a while and I've had several players make wildly unwise decisions in their first couple sessions. There seem to be three main causes for this: Ultimate Greatest Heroes Your player just built the absolute best character imaginable. They're a pyromaniac with an attitude problem and completely ...


12

This kind of problems are better solved by talking to the player, first as a DM, then as a group. Many would recommend a session zero as well, as there is one player that is playing a game which the rest is not. Maybe is not what he expected out of the experience? I've had this problem before and the whole group fell on him out and in game, and a not very ...


12

I have two approaches to this: Club Style I play in a university club. When I GM, I am always prepared to explain rules, but I only explain them a) when they come up and b) when I havn't already explained that rule several times. Because even I have a limit. Well, maybe there's also a c) I break down the rules into bits and pieces and feed the relevant ...


11

Treat this as an opportunity to grow together as a group. While you are the only experienced player, you will be learning D&D 5e as a group. Together. That can be a lot of fun. I strongly suggest that you let go of your instincts and assumptions from your last edition. Treat this like a new game. It will help a lot. This is from personal ...


10

This looks like a typical "we have a different model of what is reasonable". This is a beast. In the real world, all beasts are afraid of fire. A strange source of fire in the night is going to be something a beast would avoid. So obviously having a camp fire makes them more safe. This is a predator. Predators live in balance with their environment. ...


8

Sometimes the DM has to remind It's one thing for a player to make bad choices because "It's what his character would do", and it's another to make bad choices because they are not familiar with the game / genre / specific lore. Your player may be a combination of both, but you describe them as someone who is new to the game, so I would treat them as ...


8

What they are doing is rude, and you are allowed to tell them how you feel. Personally I would emphasize how hard it is to tell how interested people are if they won't do any work. HOWEVER, it's generally accepted that the worst part of playing any game is reading the rules. And you can play D&D without actually knowing the rules. One solution is to ...


8

You cannot solve this in-game, no matter what the other answers say. I've had such players before and they won't take an IC solution and accept it. Even if their bloodlust kills their character, they'll whine about it for a bit and then make an new character who is even worse. You must discuss this out-of-game with the entire group. Session Zero has already ...


7

Setting the Scene Another answer mentioned talking to your players out of the story to give them suggestions and let them know there are options, and that is absolutely something I would suggest as well. But for an in-universe option I would say that your narration and setup for a scene can provide a ton of hints on what options your party has. Something ...


6

I understand your frustration. I’ve been where you describe, professionally, recreationally, and in my community involvement. Other answers provide a lot of implementation advice getting your players introduced to the game mechanics. Before doing that, though, it’s important to adjust your mindset so that the process is fun for you, too. SODOTO SODOTO ...


5

Rule 0: You must all agree to play the same game. If characters don't match, why are they a party? The other PC's should just abandon the character, or make it clear they will. If they still don't see the problem, try and punish the PC only and not the whole party for his behavior. Present them with a few npc's, who don't appear special at first, but only ...


5

Turn This Into An Opportunity I understand that you're feeling somewhat slighted, aggrieved, pre-emptively taken-advantage-of... something in that neighborhood, right? I'm not going to tell you to stop feeling that way because (1) You feel the way you feel, and (2) I'd probably feel the same way because of the asymmetry of effort between playing and GM-ing....


4

I agree with what Devin A Poet said, but the rules actually are quite difficult to understand if you have never played RPGs and I think that reading them all is not so useful. I suggest you to tell your aspiring players what are the most important rules and ask them to understand those parts, leaving the other ones to be learned when they come up during the ...


3

Videos may be better than books Reading the book is not the only way to learn the rules. The books are not laid out with first time player in mind. A first time player does not need to know everything right off the bat, they just need to understand basic combat and ability challenges, and the book does not present that well, the real core part of ...


3

One technique I use to ensure players can (and sometimes should) run away is: I send a massive, but otherwise peaceful, giant walking across the landscape passed them. Something 40m tall. Tell them they realise, upon seeing its vast size, that they obviously can't defeat it. It will ignore them if they try to talk to it - they have nothing it wants. So ...


2

On the "flaws" of DM based RPGs is that players know there is "off the rails" unplanned stuff, and "story hooks" for long well laid out and planned adventures. The off the rails stuff is fun and all, but it can never match the epicness of Defeating The Big Bad of Evilness (tm). This means that even if players KNOW they have multiple options, they can find ...


1

Disclaimer: I don't know the specific scenario, so I don't know what the story dictates scenario-wise. I'm talking generally. You can't force the Rogue's player to play to his archetype just by asking him/her. It's the player's perogative to handle situations in any way that he likes. Even in-game it's logical, why do a lot of effort being stealthy, ...


1

1) Find out why The best characters have understandable motivations, a back story that explains why this character kills everything in sight may encourage your player to think about a reasonable explanation. I find it rare that, once you really know a fleshed out character, that wanton murder really fits the bill. If the player has created the backstory ...


1

1. Session Zero Decide what type of game you want to play. Talk to your players, and determine what type of game that they want to play. If you can meet in the middle, great! This would also be a good time to set expectations for your players. Will the tone be more serious, or lighthearted? For Waterdeep: Dragon Heist, I told my players that the campaign ...


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