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52

The spell doesn’t give objects a save — it just deals the damage directly. Only the paragraph about how it affects creatures gives a save. This circumvents the object immunity rule, since it’s not being affected by an effect with a save, it’s just being dealt damage.


51

Embrace the madness: that genie's out of the bottle Mimics are an iconic monster/trap in D&D, and have been for about four decades. There are a variety of memes and jokes associated with them, including this one. As a player or as a DM, don't be annoyed by player paranoia. Roll with it ...your arrows bounce off of the chest... and proceed ...


38

I try to add a mundane description to every scene. If your "odd" descriptions are normal for your scenes, then they won't be suspicious. You leave the forest, slightly the worse for wear, but alive. An old tree catches your eye; its bark vaguely resembles a wizened face. The old tavern matches the description given to you by the beggar. Your eyes take ...


28

Can only target creatures The spell description spells this out fairly clearly (emphasis mine): Each dart hits a creature of your choice that you can see within range. Most spells that do target objects specify that the object must be unattended for the effect to take place, likely specifically to prevent this kind of disarming which can be un-fun (...


28

A structure is not an object, but is made of objects From page 246 of the DMG and the basic rules: For the purpose of these rules, an object is a discrete, inanimate item like a window, door, sword, book, table, chair, or stone, not a building or a vehicle that is composed of many other objects. Lacking a definition from the source books, a "structure" ...


27

Fake brews: They won't get you drunk Liquids generally aren't considered valid objects, so you can't even make beer Minor conjuration works to create a small object. The argument could be made that you couldn't even create a beer in the first place since it doesn't really meet the definition of a single discreet object. See this question (among others) for ...


26

Page 119 in the DMG has damage thresholds (and other statistics) for Airborne and Waterborne Vehicles. \$\begin{array}{|l||c|} \hline \textbf{Ship} & \textbf{...} & \textbf{Damage Threshold} \\ \hline \text{Airship} & \text{...} & \text{—} \\ \text{Galley} & \text{...} & 20 \\ \text{Keelboat} & \text{...} & 10 \\ \text{...


26

Short Answer: Yes, you can. I'm not familiar with the D&D5 rules in particular, but even if there wouldn't be any mention of a teleporting item or spell, nothing prevents you as a GM from making it up for your table or specific campaign. The same goes for any limitations on existing items. If it doesn't exactly work the way you need by the rules, you ...


23

Don't give the players anything to fear Part of what causes mimic-phobia is the constant threat of things like animated armor, gargoyles, mimics, skeletons that animate from the floor, etc. I had a player that was constantly afraid of anything statue related, which is when I realized that the only time I ever describe statues is when they will animate and ...


22

You must target a creature Magic Missile states in it's description: Each dart hits a creature of your choice that you can see within range. This spell requires a target to be a creature, so you can only target creatures with this spell. Magic Missile can deal no damage You also had said that the spell never misses - but this isn't quite true. There ...


21

From DMG p. 246 (which, by the way, is where Crawford tells us to look at if we want to see "What counts as an object in D&D") or here in the DM's basic rules: For the purpose of these rules, an object is a discrete. inanimate item like a window, door, sword, book, table, chair, or stone, not a building or a vehicle that is composed of many ...


21

An object is any physical thing that is not a creature: ... targets creatures, objects, or a point of origin for an area of effect... Chapter 10. Spellcasting, pg. 204 of PHB The above description lists creatures, objects, and points in space as the 3 distinct, mutually exclusive types of targets. Note that spell effects are not physical things, and ...


21

ob·ject noun ˈäbjekt a material thing that can be seen and touched. The term "object" has no special meaning in the rules. 5e D&D's rules use plain English and they try not to infer special meaning beyond the regular English definitions of words. 5e D&D's rules are also exception based: a general rule always applies until a ...


21

The description of the Use an Object action says: When an object requires your action for its use, you take the Use an Object action. So any nonmagical item that specifically requires an action can be used with the Use an Object action. More specifically, everything on your list, with the exception of potions as you noted, can be used with the Use an ...


21

It can be destroyed in any way that other food-stuff can be destroyed. There is a big difference between Create Food and Water and the spells mentioned in the link about magical vines. The vines etc of the latter spells are all magical effects created as part of an ongoing spell, that vanish as soon as the spell ends. However, Create Food and Water has a ...


20

Nope. From the DMG at "Objects" (p.246): For the purpose of these rules, an object is a discrete, inanimate item like a window, door, sword, book, table, chair, or stone.... Your gases and liquids aren't "discrete items" in any natural-language sense of the word, so they're not (game) objects and aren't valid targets for animate objects.


19

No. Just because it’s not a weapon item doesn’t mean it’s an object. It’s neither. It’s a magical effect of a spell, with its own magical rules. To use a flame blade you follow the spell. The magic allows itself to be used with a specific spell-defined action, so that’s the only way to use the spell. A bonus action can’t be used to use the magic.


19

This won't work, for several reasons It's debatable whether a bag of holding's interior counts as a separate plane of existence in the way a portable hole does. If the bag doesn't open into a separate plane, then this plan obviously doesn't work. However, even if it does, the plan still doesn't work. First of all, measuring distance across planes is ...


18

A dead creature The spells Raise Dead and Resurrection both use the term 'dead creature' True Ressurection targets "a creature that has been dead" Revivify "a creature that has died" Reincarnate "a dead humanoid" which it then qualifies with "provided the creature has been dead" The section of the PHB on Healing uses the language "a creature that has died" ...


18

Which spell description is correct? Both Fabricate The description of Fabricate states that: You convert raw materials into products of the same material. For example, you can fabricate a wooden bridge from a clump of trees, [...] (Emphasis Mine) The spell converts raw materials into products and as stated in the description you can make a bridge ...


18

They are subject to critical hits! The Dungeon Master's Guide (pg. 246) section on Objects never specifies that objects are immune to critical hits. It gives you, as the DM, suggestions of AC and hit points for the object based on its material and size. The "Statistics for Objects" section says: When time is a factor, you can assign an Armor Class and ...


17

Before I get into the meat of the answer, it needs to be stated: You're the DM, you can do whatever you want. Especially when it comes to reskinning without changing anything mechanically. (Even players can do that.) Dropped Rock. Ranged Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, one target directly below the kobold. Hit: 6 (1d6 + 3) bludgeoning damage. Notice that there'...


17

What it covers Your reading is correct. All of these examples fall under the Use an Object action. The wording is very clear: Use an Object (PHB p. 193) When an object requires your action for its use, you take the Use an Object action. As Eric pointed out in a comment, the Thief Archetype for the Rogue gets to Use an Object as a bonus action. ...


17

RAW a petrified creature is still a creature because petrified doesn't say otherwise The Petrified condition (PHB p. 291) lists the effects of being petrified. All of the effects talk about "A petrified creature..." or "...the creature..." and none of them list the creature becoming an object. From this we know that a petrified creature is a creature not an ...


16

The common theme throughout these types of the questions is that the DM will generally only call out things that are important. So if the DM says, "there are statues flanking the stairs," that must be important. Your description should not be on just the things the players need to interact with, but with what their focus would be. Describe how a rug is ...


16

There is more work for you to adjudicate which effects will cause damage. It would make destroying objects a lot easier. Additionally some effects with saving throws don't make sense for objects. Finally it may be unfun for your players. Extra work for you The game has been balanced around the assumption that objects are hard to destroy unless they are ...


16

A creature can take something from a mage hand but there are no explicit rules for this situation The spell text for mage hand doesn't state the conditions under which an item could be taken from the spectral hands grasp. However, the game does provide DMs with tools, which I have applied as follows in this situation in my own game. Isn't the mage hand ...


15

Ammunition unusable, it becomes an improvised weapon If you were to enlarge/reduce an arrow, it would no longer be ammunition that would fit in your standard bow. It would be either too big or too small to use normally. That makes using this object to make an attack an Improvised Weapon (emphasis mine). Often, an improvised weapon is similar to an ...


14

There are a few We can start with the most available one: Just attack it. There are no rules against attacking objects that are worn or carried, but you would likely be subject to some DM rulings. Therefore any ability that just lets you make an attack (such as the Attack action) without a target stipulation qualifies. This also includes the attack(s) of ...


14

You are correct that the fireball spell only ignites (does not damage) objects. The fireball spell's description states: Each creature in a 20-foot-radius sphere centered on that point must make a Dexterity saving throw. A target takes 8d6 fire damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one. In order for a target to be damaged it ...


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