48

Evidently Not One of the cardinal, if often unspoken, laws of gaming is that if you can't get people to play with you, then you can't play. If you can't get people to play with you whenever you bring that character in, then, no, you can't play that character at least with that group. If your read on the situation is correct, your group has a problem with ...


39

The character is probably done. You have a large, collaborative, decentralized group. No one feels, or has felt, empowered to confront you over this—they have, no doubt, felt that it isn’t their place to criticize you or your character. Instead, they’re voting with their feet—which is, in this hobby, more-or-less “the nuclear option.” Which means it almost ...


37

Communicate. The only way to solve this kind of problem is to communicate with the people who are giving you trouble. You should do this one-on-one, not during a session. Give them respect and demand it for yourself. A few pointers. Assume they mean well... mostly. A fair amount of these trespasses could be well-intentioned. These players are veterans of the ...


20

I'm gonna give you the simple and short answer: If you're not having fun, leaving is the right choice. Sounds like you weren't having fun, so leaving is the right thing to do. You're playing a game. You're supposed to be enjoying yourself.


20

You need to get rid of the character some way or the other Nothing will help. Your character, as it is right now, is irredeemably gone. You can't fix her in-game because nobody wants to play with the character anymore, so you're past the point of starting a growing-up/redemption arc now. [Sole chance out: you sit down with everyone and apologize for making ...


13

There is no one time Unfortunately, there really isn't a floor time minimum or maximum and I'd be very careful about creating artificial limits within storytelling. My experience is mainly with D&D 5e, but this likely holds for other TTRPGs a well. But, this is where your role as DM/GM really comes into play. Part of your job is to be aware of the ...


10

I have come very close to being that exact problem player (and felt a great deal of relief when I saw your username, as our party has no rangers-- I did fear for a moment that this was about me!) Obviously, the best thing to do would be for your problem player to realize what they're doing and cut it out, but you're the one writing the question, so here's ...


7

I'm just going to start with your background quote. "To give some background, I was being repeatedly belittled out of character by other members, and was being made to walk on egg shells around everyone. I was already a bit on edge the whole time I had been apart of this group, which was for around six months." Honestly, that's a reason to leave a ...


6

Reasons for showing up inconsistently There are multiple reasons why this might happen: it is not entirely clear to the player that four hours is "normal" and that he should preferably always participate. something is bothering the player. This might be in the gameplay, in the fact that it is digital, in the fact that it is four hours at a time, ...


5

The rule I follow is: try not to let anyone (GM or player) hold the floor for more than 1-2 minutes at a time. If I, the GM, am monologuing for more than a minute, then my players are probably getting bored and I should speed up my description. It's 100% okay if I give a description and then the players ask a lot of questions; that means the players are ...


5

If you're not having fun in the game, it's okay to leave. It's usually really easy for a DM to find a new player -- people who post "Looking For Players" ads online generally get lots of applicants. Here's my own experience: I ran a game where one of my players wasn't having fun. She looked at her phone during the game and she kept making up ...


5

MikeQ linked an excellent and relevant related question. The accepted answer for that has some similar advice. My own experience trying to get new players to participate more has led me to use the following techniques and principles. Ask the "Experts": Each character is made with a particular set of skills. When a relevant situation arises, ask ...


4

I’m DMing a game with a couple of players who also DM and are more experienced than me (one DMs for another game with 3 of the other players in my group). I’m fairly new to DMing, and to 5e (which is what we’re playing). We’re playing online due to Covid. They‘ve been great at not overstepping their role, so I’ve not had much problems with the group, but I ...


3

I would recommend a one-on-one conversation For me, the key phrase in your question is this: Whenever I mention it he just shrugs it off and wants to keep playing. Clearly he is not aware of how his inconsistency is affecting both you and the other players, or he is but doesn't know how to deal with it and isn't confident talking about it in front of the ...


3

Hate to say this but there isn't one, and trying to stick to a specific amount of time isn't really the point. The question is Is everybody getting what they want out of it? I know that you, for instance, don't enjoy a session where you get 10 minutes of the spotlight in a three-hour session. So as your GM, I would want to shine that spotlight on you more ...


1

To sum up, this other player has already played the same adventure and is taking over in your group since they know things in advance. Most GM's and players think of that as a big no-no and work hard to avoid it. If your GM is fine with it than this isn't the game for you. That's generally called using out-of-game knowledge. Back in the day a player would ...


1

Just Talk to Them I have never played Pathfinder 2, but I will assume that the question could be universal to all TTRPGs. What I would do would be to pull the players in question aside one-on-one and express your concerns. Chances are they don't realize that they are doing this, and it is just a reflex from years of playing as a GM. You say they are nice ...


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