55

It is up to the DM. The rule for injuries in the Dungeon Master's Guide states the following: It's up to you to decide when to check for a lingering injury. A creature might sustain a lingering injury under the following circumstances: (DMG, 272) Emphasis mine. The DM, and the DM alone, makes the decision whether or not the attack caused a lasting ...


48

The answer to this is two-fold. So, to give the TL;DR first... The Equation you cited is most likely accurate, but it only applies to Adventurer's League play. It is not part of the core rules. Where the Equation Comes From The pricing model that you cited in your answer, is derived from the Adventurer's League guides. As you mentioned, there was the Tyranny ...


46

To each fall, because D&D doesn't do physics well There is no provision in the rule for multiple falls per turn, so the rule is applied the same to each. The scenario given will (using that optional rule) go as follows: After the first Warlock initiates the chain, it will follow these looping steps: Bob starts a (new) fall from one platform. As per ...


44

No negative effects Including the details on the Elven Trance feature here: Trance: Elves do not need to sleep. Instead, they meditate deeply for 4 hours a day. (The Common word for such meditation is “trance.”) While meditating, you can dream after a fashion; such dreams are actually mental exercises that have become reflexive through years of practice. ...


35

At Worst, Broken This is a perfect case of "the Rules submit to your Game, your Game does not submit to the Rules". D&D is a game where you can do literally anything. Since we cannot have a rulebook that encompasses "literally anything", the rules we do have are general and imperfect. They are not meant to be universally applied by the letter of the law....


35

Your problem as described doesn't sound like meta-gaming. It sounds like making tactics, and working together. You should encourage this! If your team can act faster than the goblin, it makes perfect sense to take it out before it can take an action. From your comment: I am trying to stop full conversations about what to do next in combat To me it ...


32

This is not how the rule is intended Instead of adding a proficiency bonus to an ability check, an attack roll, or saving throw, the character's player rolls a die. Going by the text in the DMG, quoted above, proficiency dice are used only when making a roll. It does not completely replace a character's proficiency bonus. Using dice to replace ...


31

Because the DMG wasn't finalized when AL started I did a bit of digging, and found this article from December 2014: (excerpt, emphasis added) Rules contained in the Dungeon Masters Guide may be permitted in future storyline seasons by future versions of the Player’s Guide. Until then, the Dungeon Masters Guide can only be used in D&D Adventurers ...


31

Objective Facts You already found the writer-provided option for disarming - the Disarm option in the DMG. It is an Attack, not Use An Object; they're two different kinds of actions. The uses of Fast Hands is fairly well laid out - locks, traps, and Use an Object. The types of things Sleight of Hand is meant to apply to is fairly well defined: Whenever you ...


30

In general, both Adeptus' and IcyFire's answers are correct. Specifically, the flanking rule makes positioning on a map more important since some class abilities are based on having advantage. This applies mostly to the Rogue, which already has a way to enable sneak attack when an ally is adjacent to an enemy, so it would mostly only serve to cause another ...


28

I found no mention of this issue in the books or sage advice, so you should make your own ruling. We can see that both wearing heavy armor with low strength by the default rules and being encumbered by the optional rules reduces your speed by 10ft. If we treat these as equivalents, dwarves should never become encumbered because they wear armor. This leads ...


28

The reason gritty realism makes a dungeon crawl particularly difficult is simply the dichotomy of expending spells and abilities versus expending hit points (i.e. the more spells and abilities you use in a fight, the less hit points you'll have to spend to get through the fight and vice versa). If you use the gritty realism rules and the PCs use their ...


27

Stat jumps are really important to the game, and can easily and accidentally introduce imbalances to the system. In light of that, I suggest one of these pre-existing mechanics: Traits (UA 86) and Flaws (UA 91) Unearthed Arcana introduced these mechanics. Traits give a small mechanical bonus while also imposing a complementary penalty (Near-Sighted gives a ...


27

I found an optional rule in the DMG (p. 266-267), called Healing Surges: This optional rule allows characters to heal up in the thick of combat and works well for parties that feature few or no characters with healing magic, or for campaigns in which magical healing is rare. As an action, a character can use a healing surge and spend up to half his or her ...


26

There is no official interpretation The Gritty Realism rules seem to be an afterthought, slapped on top of the usual rules. At least the 2 hours of light activities per long rest are hard to implement, I would go crazy with 166 hours of bed rest. How we do it Short Rest This one is easy, just replace "1" with "8" in the description of short rests: A ...


24

Individual rather than game-wide use is the intention of the Variant: Spell Points option. It's in the "Dungeon Master's Workshop" chapter, which has lots of advice and ideas for modifying the game to suit your table. Some of these are spelled out as game-wide. For example, under Combat Options, there are "Action Options", and the book says: This section ...


22

No. Disarming Attack isn't useless. Here's my reasoning: To determine if the Disarm option makes the Disarming Attack battlemaster maneuver useless, we need to compare a situation where either one or the other could be used — that is, whether a fighter who can make a Disarming Attack is always better off attempting a Disarm instead. I took some stats for ...


22

Upcast spells (cast with a 6th level slot) count as 6th level spells, but it's unclear whether this would apply to the Horrible Scar rule In the PHB, p. 201, under Spell Slots: Casting a Spell at a Higher Level When a spellcaster casts a spell using a slot that is of a higher level than the spell, the spell assumes the higher level for that casting. For ...


21

It's an optional rule to begin with. It's already DM's call. Taken RAW, as soon as you start falling, you instantly drop 500 feet, and then hang motionless in midair until the end of your next turn. This has a number of bizarre and entertaining implications, but for our case, it means that, using this rule, RAW, Bob's going to hit every ledge on the way ...


20

Check out the Suffocating rules The rules on suffocating can be found in chapter 8 of the PHB, or just in the basic rules such as on D&DBeyond: A creature can hold its breath for a number of minutes equal to 1 + its Constitution modifier (minimum of 30 seconds). When a creature runs out of breath or is choking, it can survive for a number of rounds ...


19

The most common ways to get cantrips are, as you mentioned, from your class and from feats. There are some other options available. Not all options are suitable for all campaigns or are compatible with preexisting characters. I've roughly ordered the options from most player control (leveling options) to least (DM fiat). Arcane Domain Clerics: From the ...


19

When dealing with Medium creatures, yes, it might read more easily to say "both". The "each of them" becomes important when dealing with Large or bigger creatures, which take up so much space that multiple creatures can fit side by side on one end. The rule, from the viewpoint of the attacker, is basically: Am I adjacent to an enemy? Is ...


19

Missing AC just means you dealt no damage it doesn't mean you didn't hit Failing to hit, or 'missing' a target's AC, is just an abstraction to indicate that you did not deal damage to the target. How this occurs varies significantly based on each character, but take the following example for a Barbarian whose AC is 10 + Dex + Con: Bruto the Barbarian's ...


19

This isn’t about causing rules interactions. It’s about altering players’ calculus about when it’s safe and worthwhile to rest without withdrawing. This rule is based on much older editions of D&D, where resting to recover basic resources (spells per day, etc.) took a full uninterrupted night’s sleep and natural healing was measured in single hit points ...


18

There's no point to doing this. The idea behind spell points is to have a single resource fueling your spells regardless of their level. However, Warlocks already have that, because their spell slots are only of a single level. With that said, if you insist on doing this, the correct progression would be: 2 4 6 6 10 10 12 12 14 14 21 21 21 21 21 21 28 28 ...


18

It's a bit of a mix In the introduction to the book, the authors state (emphasis mine): The first major rules expansion to the fifth edition of D&D, Xanathar’s Guide to Everything provides a wealth of new options for the game Written for both players and Dungeon Masters, this source offers options to enhance campaigns in any world, whether you’re ...


18

By RAW: No, it wouldn't help with flanking. The flanking rules require that two creatures (specifically allies) are on opposite sides of the creature they flank. When a creature and at least one of its allies are adjacent to an enemy and on opposite sides or corners of the enemy's space, they flank that enemy [...] However, a spiritual weapon does not ...


18

It's possible, but casters will have a field day Lost Mines of Phandelver has a lot, a lot of encounters that consist of mostly low HP enemies that will die to a single AoE spell, two tops. At first this might not seem like a big deal, but it is when you combine a lot of easily AoE'd squishy enemies with the ability to get your spell slots back very, very ...


18

The rules simply didn't take the flying case into account. You'll notice there is no reference in any of the entries in the table to losing a wing instead of an arm. I think it was simply written before these flying races became playable. The highlighted text makes perfect sense if you are restricted to using your legs to move around but makes no sense if ...


17

Yes, armour counts towards encumbrance. If you're wearing 65lb plate armour, it doesn't count as weighing nothing because you're trained in its use. Weapons also count: lugging around a maul or pike weighs you down.


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