85

You certainly have the authority to "boot" this player from a table. In addition to the usual "DM makes decisions for the fun of everyone" boilerplate language that is found in adventures, take note of the following lines from the Adventurer's League Code of Conduct (found at the end of both AL Player's Guides and AL DMGs): Participants must conduct ...


49

The D&D Adventurers League does not dictate who can and who cannot sit at your table. All games are organized by the owner/operator of the location. In a home game, that's the home owner. In a store or convention setting, that's the store/con owner or organizer as dictated by the owner. Most stores or conventions have a desire to sit everyone and take ...


36

Like this: Score sheet from C1 Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan. To summarize, parties were scored as a whole, not individual characters. Small numbers of points were given and deducted for a variety of specific actions as well as general outcomes, sorted by room/encounter. There were also larger numbers of points given or deducted for big, overarching goals ...


35

Organized Play. D&D Adventurers League is an "organized play" system. Playing Local stores host games (often with volunteer DMs, sometimes with paid ones). Players play point-build or array-build characters in whatever adventure is being run. Character's experience total is tracked, and players can drop-in/drop-out on a session by session basis....


30

Energy Put focus into roleplaying, even if you're watching someone else do it. Focus yourself on what they are saying and doing, even if it's kinda boring, and project your body language and voice while you're acting in-character. Be much less high-intensity when simply describing your bonuses while rolling, or asking someone to pass the chips. This will ...


17

The RPGA is what D&D Organized Play used to be called, and is the oldest/largest organization of the sort, started by Frank Mentzer in 1980. Like the newer Pathfinder Society, it organized games at conventions and other venues and sponsored various ongoing public campaigns. I started an RPGA-affiliated gaming club in Memphis, TN in 1999 (the FORGE) and ...


17

A "Living" campaign is one of the old RPGA-run organized play campaigns designed for you to use and advance a character across multiple play opportunities at public events like RPG conventions and game days, in the same shared world and using officially sanctioned adventures. (For you kids nowadays, the RPGA was a RPG fan organization sponsored by TSR, ...


14

Basics The D&D Adventurers League is the official organized play program run by Wizards of the Coast for Fifth Edition D&D. Typically, AL games are run in game stores or at conventions, but home and online games that follow the AL rules are also legal. The actual logistics of play can vary widely, ranging from a regular home game with a consistent DM ...


13

Set a good example This is almost too obvious to mention, but people will be more likely to roleplay if there's someone at the table who's doing it well. In particular: roleplaying should be fun for everyone. Some people, especially people new to roleplaying, roleplay by saying things like: "I'm a greedy backstabbing rogue, so I'm roleplaying by stealing ...


12

Poor* *This only applies to their starting lifestyle for adventurer league play. For a home game you can let them start with whatever they want. It's important to remember that adventurer's league is a specific interpretation of the rules for organized play. More importantly though, this gets at how downtime works in Adv League. Downtime days in Adv ...


11

In short, yes. I first met Noah Antwiler back in Gilbert, AZ when he was running games at an old game store there called Waterloo Games. He was a cheeky young teenager who thought he knew all the time what was fair for everyone. I met a guy years later, named John Smith (not an alias) who changed a module because he hadn't bothered to read it before ...


11

"Living campaign" is a common term for a "shared-universe" campaign played by an extended community of participants, usually mediated by an organization like the RPGA. The idea is that players from all over the world can participate in the evolution of a shared setting, either developing organically based on an aggregate of player actions or pre-determined ...


11

In the early days of tournament play, no. Different adventures used individual scoring systems that did not compare well. In the early days of D&D tournament play, individual modules had their own scoring systems which were much too different to allow a meaningful comparison of scores. If you look at the first two modules in the C (for Competition) ...


9

Those were part of the organized play program. They weren't intended for home game use, per se, but earning them in play at RPGA events allowed using them in later ones. I remember them being awarded as prizes for either participation and/or successful completion of events, but I wasn't active in the programs at the time. According to the Living Greyhawk ...


9

Applaud If someone does anything that looks like roleplaying, show some excitement. The better the roleplaying, the more excitement it deserves. Most people like praise and attention, so it will help them feel more comfortable the next time they get the urge. Don't push it too hard, but if you think you should use a certain amount of encouragement, kick it ...


7

As of Season 6, the rules for allocating DM experience have changed. The rules in the AL Dungeon Master's Guide (contained in the D&D Adventurers League DM Pack) trump all previous guidance, including that contained within the individual products. The new system is based on runtime and average party level. For modules, use the published runtime and ...


6

In the 1980s, (Phantastacon Convention D&D tournaments had teams completing in parallel the same modules in playing sessions. The winning team was determined by a points system scored using a hidden criteria based on tasks completed, actions performed, completion, etc. Individuals were not scored or rated, only the team's performance was scored. ...


5

RE2) The cards were distributed by the publisher via mail for rewards for judging in or hosting events (as evidenced by the (now dead) rewards link in many of the links in the Q). Each time you judged or hosted, you provided your RPGA number (since generalized by WotC to a system generic number) and received a number of points for your efforts. When you ...


5

Yes This is answered in the FAQ_v9.1 of the Adventure League Player & DM Pack Characters can play other adventures between sessions They can level up and earn rewards playing other adventures between sessions. Playing Content Between Sessions Characters can play other adventures (including other multiple-session adventures) between sessions. Players ...


5

Based on the Twitter conversation between Mike Mearls, the Lead Manager for D&D R&D and others the following issues become clear. At Home DMs will be able to run the same adventures as those being run at stores and conventions. However, they will be slightly modified and will not receive as many of the resources, such as maps, tokens, or most ...


5

A DM gets (300 XP + 150 gp) x (tier of play) per episode, where the tiers of play are as defined on PHB p.15. Note that episode is not a play-session: it's a "part or chapter" of the published adventure. You can find this rule in Section 2 of the Adventurer's League Player's Guide; it's p.13 in the season 3 version linked.


4

In a living campaign, your character is imersed into a 'world' with other players you don't know. All activity is posted to a central location, so changes in that world affect everyone who play the game. It also allows you to use one character with different DM/GMs using the same campaign. Essentially it turns table-top gaming as close as possible to being ...


4

Train or find a group of like-minded roleplayers It is very, very difficult to change an established game culture without everyone on board. The game master often has more possibilities, but even then, it is difficult. Depending on how regular the attendance is, you would need to always start from beginning at every session, which will only lead to burn-out....


3

Pathfinder: There are a number of pregen characters at various levels you can use. Any player-created characters must begin at level 1. Related question: Is it possible to start with non 1st level character in Pathfinder Society Organized Play? D&D (5e encounters): It looks like each adventure has pregen characters for it. Pregenerated PCs are ...


2

For Pathfinder Society there are Pre-Gens you can use that cover most level ranges: http://paizo.com/download/pathfinder/PFS-Pregens.zip (There should be copies at the CON) For Shadow Run you can use the Pregenerated Sample PCs in the 5e Quick Start: http://cdn.shadowruntabletop.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/E-CAT27QSR_SR5-Quick-Start-Rules.pdf For DnD ...


2

I can only speak from experience and not any specific reference to any of the other game system leagues official or otherwise apart from D&D 4th Edition. I have done this a few times with a group of 4e gamers. They play modules in chapters, and welcome one-time players to join with their ongoing party. I made a character to match the levels they were ...


2

I have been playing the various 4e Organised Play programs at a local independent gaming store here in Australia. The support for the last couple of Encounters seasons has been much less than before, but the support was still there in limited form. The support for RPGA/Living Forgotten Realms has been non-existent for at least 12 months. I am told by the ...


2

The GM is a volunteer who is there to have fun too, someone who gives up his time for the enjoyment of others. A GM who has a problem with a player can always up and leave. Which is worse? Having one unhappy player or six players without a GM? Forcing a GM to run results in the worse of all outcome. It is my experience that the AL does a great job of ...


2

I did not grow up in the US, so this is my experience from Europe. It may or may not apply to your specific diversity situation, you will probably need additional specific advice. But I think it's a bare minimum to not exclude any people: Limit influence of time and money spent on the game Make sure that the time spent outside the gaming arena does not ...


1

In short, yes. As the Guild Guide says, on p20, under the Always Available items Beyond the gear noted above, your character is restricted to purchasing additional items either from his accumulated Chronicle sheets or by capitalizing on his Fame (see page 21). And, under Benefits of Fame on p21 A character’s Fame score determines the maximum gp ...


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