New answers tagged

5

While I believe that Dale M's answer is correct, the Sage Advice Compendium (page 17) also clarifies: Determining whether a game feature is magical is straightforward. Ask yourself these questions about the feature: Is it a magic item? Is it a spell? Or does it let you create the effects of a spell that’s mentioned in its description? Is it ...


4

Balance isn't really of concern when all the power does is give information. I have never had total cover block the power, or seen it block the power and that is a good thing. If knowing what is around can break a quest or campaign then something went wrong long ago, but knowing something is under the old church can lead to new adventure. A Paladin will ...


4

I had the party camping in the countryside, and I planned a Mud Mephit ambush. So I had them do Perception checks, and told them they felt watched and they could feel something was wrong... but then only saw mud, and never rolled high enough to see the mud actually moving towards them. So the paladin says "this looks fishy", and uses Divine Sense. Welp. He ...


17

If you have doubts about balance, keep in mind that ultimately that depends on how you as a DM build the campaign and possible encounters where this ability could be used. If you allow your player to by-pass total cover and then you consider that some parts of the adventure would be "ruined" by that, you're free to change it a bit to avoid that problem. If ...


4

Balance can easily be a thing of opinion, so at the end of the day it's up for you as a Dungeon Master to assess the situation and decide, "does this give the player an advantage they shouldn't already have?". Personally, yes, it can have a metaknowledge-esque effect as the player will know information that a Paladin would not normally know. They would be ...


14

Divine Sense can be very useful in particular campaigns/social situations I have played in a number of campaigns where Divine Sense was useful. The most prominent of which was when I ran Curse of Strahd. It was used so much that the paladin player was often running out of uses. Helping the rampant use of this ability is the fact that unlike a spell it has ...


28

It's not as useful as detect evil was in 3e, but it still has niche uses. Divine Sense is basically the 5e version of the 3rd edition Paladin's detect evil, which could be used at will. It penetrated some barriers, detected lingering auras, identified evil NPCs, and helped find hidden enemies. The problem was that 3e paladin used detect evil on every ...


1

Most Fear/Frighten effects in the game confer additional effects beyond what the condition itself says Charm and Fear are both similar in this regard in that the 5th edition rules have a multitude of spells, class features, abilities, etc., that can imbue the Frightened condition on a character; and almost all of these features have specific stipulations ...


11

Yes It is simply a 'boosted' effect added to the frightened condition. The class feature text is quite clear (emphasis mine): On a failed save, the creature is frightened for 1 minute or until it takes any damage. While frightened, the creature's speed is 0, and it can't benefit from any bonus to its speed. So basically, all effects of the Frightened ...


Top 50 recent answers are included