75

I would simply run the current campaign to a quick but satisfying conclusion, then reform the group under a new campaign without the difficult player. I've done this several times in real life with no hurt feelings. If this is all online, it's even easier. I wouldn't attempt to 'have a sit down' with this player and talk about it. Just move on. They found ...


71

Have a discussion with the player, privately and not during game time. Acknowledge you invited him without discussing what the groups expectations of him were. Try to have the missing discussion with him. In the discussion point out how his current play style does not fit the groups desired play style. At the end of the discussion ask him to conform to the ...


50

Ultimately, one cannot be held responsible for how people react. However, there are good, indifferent, and bad ways to part company that do influence how people might react. First and foremost criticise behaviour not the person. I really cannot stress this enough. It is there player's actions by lying about their age and not heeding to the warning that ...


50

To me the problem seems to be that the other players think that they gained treasure as a team and divided it up according to some measure of 'fairness' and 'need.' So when one player leaves, they think that their joint loot is up for redistribution. That's a very pragmatic approach, and perhaps you should discourage it to encourage in-character gameplay (...


50

Option 1: Retcon It Given the situation of a player basically going off the rails and sabotaging the campaign, the simplest solution would be to use a retcon. Wipe out the events of the last session entirely. They didn't happen. Write out the now missing player, and life goes on. Retcons are often lousy answers in themselves, but in a case like this you'd ...


47

This might not be the answer you're asking, but maybe it's the answer you need: Simply enforce the rules. You are the DM. You make the rules at your table. Did he change his character without telling you? Tell him while playing that you did not approve this, and he plays with the original approved character. Too bad for him, because now he didn't have time ...


40

"I'm sorry, but I'm not able to run this game for you anymore." That's all you have to say. It is short, direct, and polite. They may ask why, and you can choose how to respond, if at all. If you tell them you're not thrilled with how they tackled certain subject matter, they may argue. If you instead insist "I just can't run your game", it doesn't ...


37

No gaming is better than bad gaming Clearly you're not having fun. It sounds like you are playing an entirely different game than you want to play, and the way you describe your DM it seems highly unlikely that he's suddenly going to turn around and do the high narrative, low combat type of game that you'd like to play - he seems to enjoy the heavy focus on ...


33

Why not introduce some major incident that lets your PCs go unwatched, thus with the ability to free themselves and then help fight the incident? Considering the fact that this is an historical campaign, you could start something big that didn't make it to the history books, and it could be thanks to your PC. This way, your PC redeem themselves, AND write ...


25

The first step is to ask your player if she still wants to be in the campaign Tell her to be honest with you; but it is important to not attribute motive to her. She might be being reckless because of disinterest in the campaign, or there might be group-dynamics issues, or even problems that exist outside of the group that are influencing her behavior. As ...


23

You need a session zero! Instead of running the first session when people get together, let them know you want to gather them to explain the rules, the setting and the buy-in. You can use this to explain any homebrewing or quirks you have as a DM (no talking over each other, give heads-up if you can't come to a session, and oh by the way I like rule of cool ...


22

This always seems to be the answer, but... Talk to the player first. I'm assuming you have some means of contacting your players outside your normal game time, if only to set up game or let each other know of cancellations or emergencies. Send your player a message, something along the lines of "Hey, I've noticed that you seem dissatisfied at game lately. ...


18

I take it this is an early A.D. Historical setting? It sounds like not only did Bob mess things up, you painted yourself into a corner in how you reacted to him. Here are some suggestions: A Machiavellian official, perhaps a senator or quaestor, hijacks the PCs as pawns for his own plans. He substitutes vaguely look-alike slaves to be devoured in the PCs'...


17

The way you've expressed your concerns here is already very reasonable. You could just tell them that you're dissatisfied with the game. They want to play a certain style of game, but you don't want to GM that type of game, so there's a clear mismatch. This does not need to involve any deception or proof or explanation. You are allowed to dislike things. ...


15

I'll try to answer from just a slightly more general perspective, mainly exploring the issues outside of the mere sale for gaining gold, keeping in mind that you don't seem to care much about the fate of the character, rather than that of their items. It entirely depends on you and your players If they think they are being robbed of part of their progress ...


12

So far, all options deal with erasing what happened for good and starting anew or continuing from where the story ended last time. We had a similar situation in a Call of Cthulhu campaign once and both options were unfeasable. Rewinding wouldn't have worked due to the players knowing sensible details. And we all felt that just continuing would mean, that ...


12

I've had multiple occasions when I had a player who claimed to want to play but wouldn't show up reliably. The thing I found that worked was to send an email like this: Hey -- we've enjoyed playing with you, but it seems like you've been busy recently! I'm changing your default: for most players I'll assume they'll show up unless they message me and say ...


12

Empathy I think the main thing to remember is that John is suffering. This suffering is manifesting in their irritation, controlling their character, etc. As you said, they aren't a bad person. I think the best way forward for you is to talk honestly and openly about the problem. Make sure to talk about the problem, not about John as a person. Make sure to ...


11

For starters I'd like to say that roleplaying and having a powerful character (a character that can do well in combat if you prefer) are not incompatible. Depending of the system, even a character that is not completely optimized can work in difficult combat situationa if you focus on its strengths. But yes, if the game is too much combat-focused and ...


10

A realistic point of view would be that the wizard left with his things, especially if they were worth something to him. However, since RP is mainly about having fun, and if the players genuinely feel like they're being duped out of the item, then maybe the wizard left his things (or got robbed or murdered?). This leads the party to a sub story of ...


9

I've done this a few times, and my friends have done this a few times. It is not an enormously complex interaction. You tell the other person (or people) that you wish to no longer attend this game. You tell them there is nothing wrong with the game, you just don't feel it is the kind of game for you. (That is the case here. That makes things pretty simple.)...


9

I've had a couple of situations where I was planning a game and realized that I didn't want one of my players. What I did was I cancelled the whole game. I said, "sorry, guys, I actually don't think I can run this right now. I might try again later." I figured it was better to do that than to deal with drama. Then, I started a different game, some ...


7

Therefore a prince [...] ought not to mind the reproach of cruelty; because with a few examples he will be more merciful than those who, through too much mercy, allow disorders to arise [...]; for these are wont to injure the whole people, whilst those executions which originate with a prince offend the individual only. — Machiavelli, The Prince ...


6

As a DM, when someone isn't having fun, I strongly prefer that they say that and leave the game. When players aren't having fun, this tends to manifest in behaviors that are annoying for the whole table. Maybe they'll be detached and spend time on their phone; maybe they'll distract the group with irrelevant tangents. Most frequently they tend to make up ...


6

Okay, so what I'm seeing here are two interrelated issues: A player royally screwed the party over the course of a couple sessions, leaving them in a sticky predicament. That player is now no longer around due to the players voting him out. It seems to me that issue 2 can resolve issue 1. A couple of ways you can do this: Fall On His Sword Look, it's ...


5

One more point that should be stressed: even if the player does leave the group, try to get his explicit buy-in to have his character sacrificed. Many players will probably like the concept, a dramatic farewell to the game, but not all. I've seen similar situations - PCs of former members dying to get them out of the way, narratively speaking - turn into ...


5

Talk to him in person or, failing that, send him a well written email. You definitely want to approach this delicately and with as much respect as you can communicate towards the player in question. Mention that you feel you don't get to communicate with all the players as much as you would like to and then dive into talking about what issues he might have ...


5

Hey John, you’re dumped Look, breakups suck. That’s just the plain fact. John’s going to be upset, you’re going to be upset. You can try to be nice but you have to get John to understand that he won’t be part of your campaign - try to be too nice and you lose that central message. Blunt and bloody avoids that problem. So John hates you, remember, you didn’t ...


4

The best thing to do if you're playing in a game where you're being addressed less than the more established players in a game in which you aren't having fun is to respectfully bow out of the game. Speak to the GM and tell him that you're no longer going to be playing in the game. Be as honest with him as you can while remaining polite. Tell him as ...


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