43

Yes! You can definitely play P&P games over the internet. There are basically two steps to the process. Find a group You can find a group anywhere that nerds gather online. Forums are a great source of people. You'll have the easiest time finding players for current editions of popular games, so if you're into Pathfinder or D&D 5e, you'll have no ...


20

Let's combine some of this into a compendium. Play-by-chat has been at least 80% of my time spent as a GM. It is a fun way to play because it allows immersion and in-character roleplaying to have more depth by allowing players to write their words and actions, which most people are quite comfortable with. But like all other RPG sessions, you need players. ...


17

Yes the technology is called a Virtual Tabletop or VTT. It combines the following A whiteboard that everybody can draw on or use to display image. Also used as a battleboard with token instead of miniatures. a voice and/or text chat engine RPG software utility usually including a dice roller, character sheet, and random tables. Popular VTTs include ...


14

I ran D&D games on IRC for several years. The biggest challenges were: Agreeing on a game time is tricky. When you've got international players, this is a major factor. We used a Google Calendar to post availability, and picked times when five or more were available. Communication is more cumbersome online. It may not seem like it, but response time is ...


10

In my experience, the best place to find an online group is reddit. They even have a handy filter at the top for finding only online games. Pathfinder and D&D 3+ are very popular there, and other games pop up less frequently (I found an amazing Changeling game via reddit, for example.) As others have mentioned, forums are a good second option: Giant ...


9

I have NOT run Dungeon World online, but I have run two other *World games online, and I've run Dungeon World at a table. I do have a lot of experience running online, and the playstyle I've evolved is similar in a lot of respects to what Dungeon World is trying for. Dungeon World's biggest challenge, regardless of playing venue, is the lack of structured ...


9

I would suggest you try roll20.net you do a play by play setting, or you can upgrade, as you can add on screen maps, voice, and even video chat. This also has regular chat, and other functions in this chat that make gameplay go much more smoothly. Roll20 has a looking for group system. Within 24 hours you will find at least 6-7 players for a campaign ...


7

Since this question was originally asked, more options that might give a better solution have become available. Specifically, the Roll20 online virtual tabletop. With Roll20 you can invite people by email address and they can play as their character while in-game. Some tools make it much easier even for new users, including irc style chat, voice chat and ...


6

In Roll20 One method I've used for sending messages to groups of players on Roll20 is making each group a character and sending a message to that character. Forgive me using a fantasy example, but that's where my experience lies: At the start of a campaign, I'll ask everyone for languages known, looking for ones I know will come up during play. If anyone ...


5

I've played in numerous text-based games and the problems I encountered in those inspired me to work on my own text based gaming medium. While this answer will sum up problems I've encountered as Jonathan already mentioned some, it's also an ad for my free, non-profit text based roleplaying platform. But first, issues I've encountered: (IRC related) ...


5

Forums tend to favor play-by-post games on that forum; you may have better luck with IRC channels. There are many out there, but the only one I'm personally familiar with is #giantitp. They're not very big on Pathfinder, though, they prefer 3.5 standard.


4

One thing that helps me as a DM in my very large, easily distracted group is to implement an "on-deck" call. So I'll say, "John, your turn. Jane, you're up next", and make sure I get an acknowledgement that Jane heard me. Even if Jane hadn't been paying attention until now, it gives her all of John's turn to get caught up on what's been happening (which on ...


4

It's not nearly as common as Play-by-post games, but I've certainly seen posts recruiting for play-by-chat games on the Paizo forums. It's especially a good fit since you're looking for Pathfinder players.


4

It sounds like you're not wedded to IRC at all, just the concept of a custom play-by-text RPG tool, considering you say that "Roll20 is essentially the same thing". Roll20 is currently popular, but by no means the only example of a RPG-focused application. Most of the popular ones are stand-alone desktop clients, and yes, they do have a lot of excellent, ...


4

In addition to Longspeak's excellent answer, I'll note that using a chat client that supported multiple simultaneous chat threads that display side-by-side was a big help when I was running Apocalypse World this way. Using multiple chat windows, I could run somewhat-simultaneous scenes if the party split up, or characters who weren't the focus of a scene ...


3

Yes, it's possible to play RPGs like D&D (and GURPS, Fate, Cypher System, and even Amber Diceless) online, via posts on forums, email, chat, or dedicated game table systems like Roll20. There are a couple things to be aware of in doing this. First, play by post is very, very very slow. I've been in a play by post GURPS campaign (most of the complexity ...


3

Yes, it is possible to play something that looks like pencil & paper D&D online. The first option is to find some people online - asking around in social networks, in roleplaying games specialized forums or in some sites made exactly for that purpose (we have rpgplayers in Italy) - and to play in videoconference. It will be slower than playing at ...


3

We much preferred VSee to other chat programs and play-by-post or -e-mail gaming. As far as dice goes, you can't go wrong with dicelog. The most difficult challenges was keeping people focused, from a DM perspective. Being at the same table contributes a lot. I combated this by preparing many, many speeches and such in advance, as well as working toward ...


3

RPG-Directory.com is a really active forum community for play-by-post roleplayers, perhaps a good place to start chatting with people and finding someone to suit your game?


3

Most RPG Forums have sections for finding people for play-by-post, skype or in person games. Some links that may help (these are sites I have used before, although not for online games): Giant in the Playground Knights 'n' Knaves Role-Player.net However, I would suggest looking for Pathfinder-specific forums or sites if you can (I can't personally ...


3

RISUS is perfect for your needs RISUS is system-neutral, so you can use it in any setting at all. I've used it to run fantasy one-shots, a modern crime game, and a futuristic robot-fighting campaign. Interactions are resolved by rolling a d6 per level you have in the skill you're using. In combat, you use opposed rolls and the loser's skill drops by one (...


2

Well, in the end you have to either torque down and agree on rules to make it go faster/more in character or deal with it being slow and not in character. The best rules you could enforce as a group are: You have to declare your combat action in XX amount of time or you lose your turn. You had a "distraction?" Well, it's not like you can't play with us ...


2

I played in an IRC game back in college. I don't remember how long the sessions lasted, but the game fizzled after a month or two. Pros The GM was able to copy and paste description. I think his doing this was what kept the game going at a good pace. IRC dice rolling was easy. /roll 2d10. Trivial. Infinite handles. What I mean by this was that if ...


2

We had our first session last night and it was a tremendous success. We used Skype for both in-character text chat and out-of-character rules and clarifying discussion. I really like this because the result is a relatively clean transcript of the actual in-character bits and speedier resolution of the mechanical elements of game play. Best of all, minutes ...


2

For planetside adventures, I recommend "Star Worlds - The Streets of Mos Eisley". This is a hack powered by the Apocalypse engine. It has the most faithful character classes to the Star Wars movies, plus hirelings, adversaries, vehicles and spacecraft, and a great keyed map of the infamous spaceport. When you take those vessels into space, I recommend ...


2

I would suggest you try Star Wars World, a hack of Apocalypse World. You can download the rules from here, though discussion is held on the story games site in the link above. In general, the Apocalypse World engine satisfies a lot of the need to have it in an interactive environment not meant for RPGs, i.e. It uses 2d6 for resolution, with 6- meaning a ...


2

Player-initiated summaries benefit everyone. Since you're presenting information to be used cooperatively, having a player do the summary has benefits for everyone involved in the process. It helps everyone who didn't know for obvious reasons; now they have more information. It helps you, the gamerunner by telling you what the player thinks is important ...


1

Yes, at the most basic, all you need is a communication channel. This could be some sort of instant messaging (IRC, some other form of text-based group chat, ...). You could do it using remote audio, of some sort (TeamSpeak, ...). You could do it using telephones and a phone bridge (although this may get expensive), or voice-over-IP (VoIP). You could do it ...


1

From what I've seen, most people bake that functionality into a chatbot, therefore divorcing the functionality and making it available to any client in the room. That allows for compatibility with chatters on any OS, using any client they wish, including mobile IRC clients. I saw a bot once, though sadly it vanished when the game died, that had a complete ...


1

You have to have a rules of order so that people aren't typing over each other and causing there to be multiple conversations going on at the same time in a shared chatbox. It can be an issue, but having some way for people to buzz in (such as a smiley emoticon as the signal they want to talk) can help keep order. As for services, let me recommend roll20....


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