75

Other answers have already dealt capably with your question: Can DM's force skill checks? Yes. Should they do so? Maybe - maybe not. But, it appears to me that your real issue may not be the skill check itself, it's how the DM dictated your character's response to it. You said: Last session, my DM made me roll a Deception check against another player. I ...


65

You need to talk to your players If this is happening both in and out of character, then this is clearly an out-of-game issue that must be handled out-of-game. Before going into this, I strongly recommend reading this article on the Five Geek Social Fallacies. You shouldn't be tolerating awful or abusive behavior, just because it's being done in a gaming ...


50

Two options, but first, something to understand... Acquiring Stealth in combat means your opponent lost track of where you are right now, it does not mean that your previous location was erased from their mind. Nor does Stealth make you invisible. Physically Go Looking For Them Remember that Stealth stops working if it makes sense that it stopped working. ...


49

As a spy, you presumably have a lot of deception-related skills. One good option is to make it look like a suicide. People who commit suicide generally don't want to be resurrected, and won't come back if you try. If you also create a fake corpse (find someone who died of old age and thus can't be resurrected, and disguise their corpse as the sorceress's),...


41

In short: Yes, it can. But, there has to be clear communication between the player wanting to betray the other party members and the DM. If the player springs it on both the party and the DM then the answer changes abruptly to a resounding "No." In addition to that, and probably the most important aspect to my answer of yes is this: It must make sense in ...


39

There are several options, some more devastating than others. I'll list my three favorite ones here: Chase the Rogue As Guildsbounty mentioned, a hidden Rogue isn't invisible: it just means their enemies have lost track of where they are. But their enemies still know where they were. You can run behind the last object you saw the Rogue go behind. Unless ...


31

A note: While this is a system-agnostic question, certain systems (ex: DitV, FATE, Paranoia) are much better at handling this than others (ex: Any D&D system). Some games are even focused entirely around CvC conflict (En Garde, Everyone Is John, etc). For the purposes of this response I'm going to assume that in this game the party is all on the same '...


30

First of all, puzzles usually don't really fit into the rules of most games. Players don't solve them by using the mechanic abilities of their characters, they are solving them by using their own deductive reasoning. That's why I would recommend you to design challenges, not puzzles. A puzzle can be a nice distraction, but if puzzle solving becomes the main ...


28

I have personally experienced this as a player being betrayed, and as a GM running a game where the PCs turned on each other in my game. Both games were Vampire the Masquerade games and both were very positive gaming experiences for everyone involved, and really were great examples of why I play RPGs. Below are the details of both games, presented as sort of ...


28

It's not unusual to have a "no pvp" rule. I use a rule like this at my table and it works okay. On two occasions I've had people who really had a problem with the rule, so I asked them to leave my table, and the other players thanked me later. It is a bit unusual to say "no pvp or you die immediately". Why do you need an "or"? If someone tries to pvp, you ...


25

Sort of? To start with; remember that the GM is: (Usually) not adversarial The arbiter of all-the-things; including house-rules, rulings, etc. Essentially a story-teller that you are helping craft a story for (and that can't really know the entirety of the story since the dice and player actions will dictate it to some degree What he probably means Given ...


23

I have witnessed a game where the two stories are played out asynchronously. Group A was going through their scenario (Took 20-30 minutes?) while Group B waited out their turn (with brief moments of "meanwhile" dialogue to keep them involved). Group A found the group of "bad guys", and managed to launch a sneak attack. After the surprise round, they rolled ...


21

The DMG says: Some DMs prefer to run a social interaction as a free-form roleplaying exercise, where dice rarely come into play. Other DMs prefer to resolve the outcome of an interaction by having characters make Charisma checks. Either approach works, and most games fall somewhere in between, balancing player skill (roleplaying and persuading) ...


20

If you're looking for permanent ways to get rid of her without the 'ease' of resurrection, there are a few options available to you. I'll only go over the ones that you could potentially purchase and don't need to have a pre-determined target, since you have magic-items as a tag. Note, I'm assuming you have the requisite UMD score to be able to use spell ...


19

I have tried this in two ways in the past. I think of the two, only one will be of use for your objective. PC Villain in the Group Create the villain with its player and discuss what their villainous goal actually is. Ensure the player can and will commit to being a villain. Their goal should require the villain to need to be close to or involved with the ...


18

Inciting intrique (without forcing firefights) Ensure that both factions' real goals require resources or skills that exist in the other half of the party. If the goals can be accomplished alone, the party splits into two separate parties that merely happen to be travelling together. Example: If faction A contains the party mage, make sure faction B has ...


18

I find it interesting that all the answers here refer to betrayal that is secret to the players as well as the characters. While there's certainly advantages to that, I think so long as your group is mature enough not to meta the situation there's plenty of advantage to doing things out in the open as far as the players are concerned. I'm currently in a ...


17

My experiences are very similar to Rain's answer. I'm part of a very tight group, we've been roleplaying continuously for over 16 years now and we know each other very well. We've had two very memorable party betrayals. Both were "series finales", so the campaign did not continue afterward. One was completely spontaneous, the other meticulously planned. I ...


17

Can they force ability checks? Yes they can A few ability checks are explicitly given by the rules, but in general, the GM is expected to call ability checks in situations where they think they are appropriate. So to answer the immediate question, the GM calling social checks against other players is not categorically bad. But it is highly situational. In ...


16

You are a rogue type, and clearly evil, so you need to think nonlinearly about this. There's a lot of spells and magical doodads that might/could help, but the easiest practically-no-cash-required way is to make them unwilling to return. "If the subject's soul is not willing to return, the spell does not work." So - kidnap a kid, or loved one, or ...


14

Thinking about the models of 4e, I would assert something a little odd. By choosing to become an NPC, you quite literally become a "monster" for purposes of combat. Arrange with your GM an opportunity for you to become, thematically, an elite or solo (depending on what level of assistance you want) and to translate your character into a monster. The reason ...


14

The DM resolves the move as normal Looking at the situation "I stab the fighter, who I'm standing right behind and who does not suspect me" definitely fulfills the trigger for backstab When you attack a surprised enemy with a melee weapon. So, that means the Thief succeeds in this first, sneaky attack and does damage to the fighter. If he does that though, ...


13

Get buy in from the group about intra-party intrigue. If the players aren't interested in this, it's going to flop. Play with open secrets: Players know each others' secrets but their characters don't. Consider a system other than D&D. D&D's main resolution mechanic is combat, which I presume you're trying to avoid between PCs.


13

You might want to read the Houses of the Blooded rpg. It is designed to be a game of political backstabbing and power play. It is well written, coupled with a fantasy setting (and quite interesting one) and is grim and romantic by design. You will need to prepare an awful lot of custom setting material. But game includes actual rules for: Vassal-lord ...


13

This is a great premise for some brilliant character dynamics and interaction and skipping ahead in time might see you lose most of it. I would either go with Greater common evil - Needs must, eh? Forced betrayal, i.e. the monk was forced to act the way she did because she was under greater duress than what the others were aware of. ANSWER: I would ...


13

"Or let me give another example. There is a riddle to solve in the game. This ever ends up player talking about it as if they are themself and not they characters." Make the riddle something that real players wouldn't know, then this isn't a problem anymore. For example: You see a carving of farmers working a field. Above them is a hole that looks like ...


13

You already have your answer You wrote it yourself. To combat this, I implemented what I call a neutrality pact to protect the bard and cut down on the bullshit. In this pact, all PCs must agree to never intentionally attack or otherwise harm another PC or they die immediately. Naturally, some members of the party, particularly the barbarian, don't ...


12

Roleplaying games are rarely perfectly balanced even for their intended use of PvE. PvP balance is nonexistant. It all comes down to who has the most access to and the most incluence on the DM. That's no fun, that's metagaming to the extreme. Take AD&D 2. All it needs for your PC killer is to say "Next night when all of them sleep during my watch, I ...


11

I have played "PCs as villains" in various ways. The more you want a long, traditional campaign play with all the PCs "in the group," the more constrained you will be in options - a one shot or a planned several session adventure, you can accomplish this all sorts of wild ways. Covert Bad Guy In The Group In a long Night Below campaign (AD&D 2e), I had ...


11

The short answer: You have to choose between intrigue and unit cohesion. Intrigue involves some degree of "screwing over" the other faction and if you are the "screw-ee" you don't feel very cohesive towards the "screw-er" The longer (and more complex answer): If the main plot involves the same goal, but two very separate reasons to achieve that goal, you ...


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