85

In all seriousness... Don't do it There isn't a way to spring this on players without hurting feelings. If you do want to do it then... Set the Expectation Beforehand GM: Hi everyone. I'm thinking of running this oneshot game. There is a complication - there's a hidden traitor, much like tabletop games Avalon and Betrayal at the House on the Hill and so ...


79

Other answers have already dealt capably with your question: Can DM's force skill checks? Yes. Should they do so? Maybe - maybe not. But, it appears to me that your real issue may not be the skill check itself, it's how the DM dictated your character's response to it. You said: Last session, my DM made me roll a Deception check against another player. I ...


73

“This behavior is ruining the game for me.” This sounds very not fun. Your friend needs to understand this. This is an out-of-game conversation that needs to be had. You need to cordially explain to your friend that you are not okay with player-vs-player combat and that it is ruining the game for you. Generally, nobody should assume the table is okay with ...


65

You need to talk to your players If this is happening both in and out of character, then this is clearly an out-of-game issue that must be handled out-of-game. Before going into this, I strongly recommend reading this article on the Five Geek Social Fallacies. You shouldn't be tolerating awful or abusive behavior, just because it's being done in a gaming ...


64

You were not being a jerk Both of your players were offered agency: the one got the chance to attack an NPC and the other got the chance to interfere with a murder. If the player who attacked the NPC is upset about this, what you next do is discuss with them why they feel that way, and why they feel that killing NPC's out of hand is a solution to a ...


56

The Hidden Third Option: Don't Play This Character Based on information in the main text of the post, as well as answers to questions in the comments, this character: Has never been played at all, Was not accidental, but designed in full knowledge of the nature of the adventure you're going on, and Lacks the typical warlock "easy out" by having ...


54

Ask your DM and fellow players for their advice. You are currently facing an all-too-common conflict that is sometimes called "my guy syndrome", where your character has in-game motives for doing something that could make the game unfun for the real players. What's important is that you and your friends have fun, and that is entirely up to how ...


52

Two options, but first, something to understand... Acquiring Stealth in combat means your opponent lost track of where you are right now, it does not mean that your previous location was erased from their mind. Nor does Stealth make you invisible. Physically Go Looking For Them Remember that Stealth stops working if it makes sense that it stopped working. If ...


50

As a spy, you presumably have a lot of deception-related skills. One good option is to make it look like a suicide. People who commit suicide generally don't want to be resurrected, and won't come back if you try. If you also create a fake corpse (find someone who died of old age and thus can't be resurrected, and disguise their corpse as the sorceress's),...


40

Just tell everyone up front I usually start PVP-games, or, really, any game, with a pre-character-creation talk about what is and isn't okay in the game, how I'm resolving the major rules contradictions and underspecifications that are applicable to most every character, and what players should expect from the game. In a game where I wanted to do this, I ...


39

There are several options, some more devastating than others. I'll list my three favorite ones here: Chase the Rogue As Guildsbounty mentioned, a hidden Rogue isn't invisible: it just means their enemies have lost track of where they are. But their enemies still know where they were. You can run behind the last object you saw the Rogue go behind. Unless ...


36

This is something you'll have to settle among yourselves. Everyone plays D&D a bit differently, sometimes more than a bit. There are groups that go to extreme lengths to maintain a hygienic distinction between character and player knowledge to avoid "metagaming", there are groups that feel the game only improves by allowing players to leverage any ...


35

You've told us: your group is playing in a premade campaign that doesn't really have enough plot your group is unhappy because there's not enough plot one of your players is proposing to make their character secretly-a-villain in order to generate some plot It seems to me that your problem is not "how can I handle a character being secretly-a-villain?&...


33

A note: While this is a system-agnostic question, certain systems (ex: DitV, FATE, Paranoia) are much better at handling this than others (ex: Any D&D system). Some games are even focused entirely around CvC conflict (En Garde, Everyone Is John, etc). For the purposes of this response I'm going to assume that in this game the party is all on the same '...


33

If possible, run the side session on another time or day with just those participating We've actually done this a number of times in a campaign I'm playing in. The players or DM occasionally come up with side quests relevant to a select few players, who we then find a time to play through an another day of the week. This prevents it from disrupting the ...


32

Betrayal is achieved through imperfect information, possibly conflicting goals, and the ability for orders to be miscommunicated. (Caution, game theory ahead) Literature Review I'm going to assume that you're familiar with the Prisoner's Dilemma, the iterated prisoner's dilemma, the stag hunt, (Kuhn 2009) and the problems with resource availability on ...


32

Figure out why your character is with the party. What is his reason to go along with them, if the party's goal is so directly counter to his personal goals? Does he have a personal connection to one or more of the other party members? Maybe he's more loyal to that party member (e.g. a sibling or lover) than to his own patron and religious beliefs. Does he ...


30

First of all, puzzles usually don't really fit into the rules of most games. Players don't solve them by using the mechanic abilities of their characters, they are solving them by using their own deductive reasoning. That's why I would recommend you to design challenges, not puzzles. A puzzle can be a nice distraction, but if puzzle solving becomes the main ...


28

It's not unusual to have a "no pvp" rule. I use a rule like this at my table and it works okay. On two occasions I've had people who really had a problem with the rule, so I asked them to leave my table, and the other players thanked me later. It is a bit unusual to say "no pvp or you die immediately". Why do you need an "or"? ...


27

I've both DMed surprise villain PCs (two of them!) and played the surprise villain PC myself, over multiple D&D 4e campaigns. Based on those experiences, I recommend the following: Ground Rules With Your Villainous Player Before starting on this plot, lay down some ground rules with your villainous player based on your group's tolerance for various "...


26

Sort of? To start with; remember that the GM is: (Usually) not adversarial The arbiter of all-the-things; including house-rules, rulings, etc. Essentially a story-teller that you are helping craft a story for (and that can't really know the entirety of the story since the dice and player actions will dictate it to some degree What he probably means Given ...


25

The DM is wrong here As the DMG explains on page 237, a roll is called for by the DM when the outcome is in question. Unless forced not to by magic (ie. something that explicitly overrules this) you have agency over what your character believes. If you state that you do or do not believe what someone says, there is no room for a roll, as the outcome is not ...


24

I have witnessed a game where the two stories are played out asynchronously. Group A was going through their scenario (Took 20-30 minutes?) while Group B waited out their turn (with brief moments of "meanwhile" dialogue to keep them involved). Group A found the group of "bad guys", and managed to launch a sneak attack. After the surprise round, they rolled ...


23

I assume you are not sure of your players about this, because you are asking this question. First of all, no, do not betray the trust. There's a very good chance some will get upset. Well, unless you want to weed out the players who get upset, to create a group which enjoys this kind of shenanigans without warning, then this is one way... To make this work, ...


22

The DMG says: Some DMs prefer to run a social interaction as a free-form roleplaying exercise, where dice rarely come into play. Other DMs prefer to resolve the outcome of an interaction by having characters make Charisma checks. Either approach works, and most games fall somewhere in between, balancing player skill (roleplaying and persuading) ...


22

I think there's several issues here to unpack: Hindrances are not just convenient Bennie generators While being affected by a Hindrance gives you a Bennie, you should never forget that the logic is not "I play out my Hindrance to get a Bennie", but "I always play out a Hindrance, and when it significantly hinders me, the GM gives me a Bennie ...


21

First off, something this big should be handled in the group's social contract. At what point is PVP allowed? An example from my experience: I played a very blunt human in a D&D campaign and butted heads with an elven Bladesinger. Basically the party was mostly elves and when one would do something foolish, my character would make a joke at that ...


20

If you're looking for permanent ways to get rid of her without the 'ease' of resurrection, there are a few options available to you. I'll only go over the ones that you could potentially purchase and don't need to have a pre-determined target, since you have magic-items as a tag. Note, I'm assuming you have the requisite UMD score to be able to use spell ...


18

Discuss it among the players first. Surprise twist villains always sound really interesting in theory, but in practice they tend to backfire explosively when mishandled. I've been in campaigns where this happens. I've run (and ruined) my own campaigns by trying this, even when I thought I was being careful and clever. Of course it's not impossible to ...


18

A Warlock's relationship with his/her patron can be one of the most varied and interesting parts of the character. A Warlock is not necessarily a devout follower of their patron. You could be very reluctant about being a Warlock to begin with, see it as a curse, or as a means to an end. Generally, it's very hard to play a character that has the complete ...


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