Hot answers tagged

55

I'm not sure this is a problem if you're actually reading and applying the rules for poisons in 5e. Poison is bought in single doses. How much were they allowed to buy? And how much did they buy them for? Wyvern poison is supposed to cost 1200gp for a single dose. It's only 50gp a pop if you extract and make it yourself which takes a whole bunch of time, ...


45

You have to be poisoned to take the damage (he is correct) The description of the Potion of Poison says: If you drink it, you take 3d6 poison damage, and you must succeed on a DC 13 Constitution saving throw or be poisoned. At the start of each of your turns while you are poisoned in this way, you take 3d6 poison damage. [...] If you don't fail the initial ...


45

I just want to add some real world experience as a whip wielder in real life. One of the things we do for tricks is to dip the "popper", that's the cutting part of the whip, in ink. We do this to color our targets. One dose will last 5 or so hits, and gets into the target. I can't speak to how real poison works, but as far as to whether or not a whip ...


38

Yes, this works according to the rules. Whether it "makes sense" is up to you. You've already quoted the relevant parts of the rules. Poison, Basic. You can use this vial to coat one slashing or piercing weapon... PHB, page 153 A whip is a slashing weapon. There's nothing to say that it only applies to bladed or metal weapons. As for whether it ...


37

Tasting isn't quaffing. Chances are he didn't gargle the potion to get a feel for what was in it, he got a bit on the tip of his finger and then rubbed it on his tongue. He would be able to tell from just a bit of a taste that no this is not a potion ow why is my tongue burning. If he explicitly states that he sucks the potions down like a vacuum cleaner ...


35

First of all, talk to the ranger's player. Point out that this is kind of disruptive to the game as a game, and taking countermeasures via opponent design would be unfair to the other characters. Also, if he has a lot of this stuff and word gets around, NPCs will be motivated to acquire it. They might steal it, or coerce him into selling or giving it to ...


33

As BESW said, don't expect the game system to model reality. That said, if you need to figure out stats for potato tea... It's an ingested poison. As the SRD says, Ingested poisons are virtually impossible to utilize in a combat situation. A poisoner could administer a potion to an unconscious creature or attempt to dupe someone into drinking or eating ...


33

The Drow would still deal poison damage after a minute Creature statblocks only do what they say they do. In the statblock for a Drow, they are listed as having a crossbow attack that targets must save against or be poisoned. There's no mention of poison needing to be actively applied to maintain this effect, or of the Drow even having a supply of poisons on-...


32

Sometimes From the SRD, italics mine: ...when an attacker that you can see hits you with an Attack, you can use your reaction to halve the attack's damage against you In other words: Uncanny Dodge works only against the damage of the attack itself. Effects that add directly to the damage of the attack - such as Sneak Attack - would be affected, but ...


30

You are definitely Poisoned As PJRZ pointed out, failing the saving throw by 5 or more is an example of failing the saving throw. As such, you will both be unconscious (because you failed the save by more than 5), and poisoned (because you failed the saving throw at all). It is very reasonable for you to ask why some other game features would include the ...


29

No, but flesh golems are also immune to poison damage The poisoned condition and the poison damage type have no mechanical link beyond the fact that they are both poison derived. This is relevant for features like the Monk's Purity of Body which grants "immunity to [...] poison". Which is to say something caring about or affecting one does not ...


28

The poison remains until piercing/slashing damage is done, or until it is washed off. This appears to have been officially errata'd in 2015. Here is the relevant portion with the relevant sentence emphasized: Poison (p. 257). [...] The other three poison types have new descriptions: [...] Injury. Injury poison can be applied to weapons, ammunition, trap ...


27

At your discretion a partial dose of poison may have (reduced) effects. The DMG (257-258) distinguishes between different kinds of poisons and how they take effect, by contact, inhaled, by injury or Ingested (DMG 257): Ingested. A creature must swallow an entire dose of ingested poison to suffer its effects. You might decide that a partial dose has a ...


26

As far as I am aware, there is no way to give a creature the incapacitated condition directly. However, there are 4 conditions that give a creature the incapacitated condition as part of their effects. These are: Paralysed Petrified Stunned Unconscious There are a number of ways to apply these conditions without damaging your beloved pet. Within the ...


25

Yes Well, technically you don't get poisoned (which is a condition), but you take poison damage. You could argue that it doesn't make sense because the armor "absorbed the hit", but that is not what Heavy Armor Master implies. Not getting hit is already determined by your armor class, the fact that the attack hit but the damage was then lowered a ...


24

The Green Dragon's breath is described as: Poison Breath (Recharge 5-6). The dragon exhales poisonous gas in a 90-foot cone. Each creature in that area must make a DC 22 Constitution saving throw, taking 77 (22d6) poison damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one. It is "poisonous gas" the Dwarf gets advantage on the save....


24

Malignant poison reads As a full-round action, the alchemist can increase the save DC of any poison by 4 and increase its duration by 2 frequency increments (for example, large scorpion venom lasts 8 rounds instead of 6 and drow poison lasts 4 minutes instead of 2). Additionally, malignant poisons take effect immediately and do not have an onset ...


24

If he explicitly swallows "a gulp" of draconic acid (presumably analogous to Black Dragon breath) then yes, he's very very dead. That falls into the "inescapable death" situations described in the core books (trapped in a pit with the roof descending to crush you, drowning in an acid pool etc.). Human stomach acid has got nothing on the kind of magical-...


24

The Paladin is immune The fact that the saving throw is specifically against disease, and that Paladins are immune to disease means they should not have to make a save against this effect, regardless of what condition it applies on failure. I suspect that the 'poisoned' condition is a way of representing the penalty of being diseased since there isn't a ...


23

Your GM was right... technically... and depending on the details. And he was right for a reason other than the one he gave. Your explanation of the situation could be interpreted in two ways. When you say: "When I affected an enemy with it, my GM succeeded the 1st save" ...if you meant the enemy had already failed a save before the GM made his 1st ...


23

As you stated in your question, this is a creature ability, not a weapon bonus. You can think of this as an elite fighting style where the drow are trained to keep their weapons poisoned as part of the fighting style by whatever theatrical method you choose. Perhaps the elite drow keep the outer layers of their greaves soaked in this poison, and after each ...


23

That's a perfectly acceptable solution. Other solutions include: Having the poison spoil due to improper storage (does your Ranger have a fridge?) Having the poison attract actual Wyvern's (he'll be really popular with the group!) Having enemies focus fire the ranger as he starts mowing them down (Ranger's love tanking.) Make it so that only the first bit ...


23

As an edge case, the RAW technically allows this You can use the poison in this vial to coat one slashing or piercing weapon or up to three pieces of Ammunition. [...] A creature hit by the Poisoned weapon or Ammunition must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw or take 1d4 poison damage. The problem here is that this is an edge case. Normally, a slashing ...


23

Conjured ammunitions are not poisonous The poison is not part of the ammunition. The damage is not part of the weapon damage. "Make a save" damage never was. For instance, it is excluded from critical additional damage. It is not cloned and therefore only deals the ammunition 3d8 piercing(?) damage. Only the coated ammunition is poisonous, and since it ...


22

In general you'll need to look to the specific effect's rules. Most often you probably have something like this, from the Giant Poisonous Snake statblock: Hit: 6 (1d4 + 4) piercing damage, and the target must make a DC 11 Constitution saving throw, taking 10 (3d6) poison damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one. If the rules ...


21

So, this is how poisons (and most other afflictions) work: You suffer the effects every time you fail a save The frequency tells you how often you make a save, once the onset time has passed If there is no onset, you make a save immediately The poison is finished when the conditions for a cure are met, or the duration has elapsed For black adder venom, ...


21

You gain the effect of an injury poison continuously while the poison remains potent. From the catalogue of poison types (DMG p. 257): Injury. A creature that takes slashing or piercing damage from a weapon or piece of ammunition coated with injury poison is exposed to its effects. In the case of Basic Poison (PH p.153) the duration is quite unambiguous:...


21

Yes, you are also poisoned. If you fail by 5 or more you fall unconscious, but no matter how much you fail by you have still failed and so suffer the normal consequences as well.


21

It cannot poison the paladin. A disease, mechanically, is not a condition. It itself can impose conditions to PCs or provide other effects. The paladin is immune to disease and hence immune to its conditions and effects that he would otherwise suffer from (in this case being poisoned and turning into an abyssal wretch). If a character was immune to being ...


20

This archived forum from rpg.net discusses the same question, it might be worth taking a look at. The general points seem to be the following: Poisoned arrows have been used by certain tribes, mainly to hunt smaller animals, though people used them to battle other people as well (Native American tribes, Chinese armies are brought up as examples.) The ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible