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442

I am a huge dumb nerd so I just went and proved this for myself with a bathtub and a bottle of Red Guitar. By pulling the cork with my teeth and immediately folding my thumb over the lips of the bottle, I managed to leak only the merest iota of wine. If I had the clearance to stand upright instead of kneeling there, like a moron, dunking my head and holding ...


74

When you drink this potion your physical age is reduced by 1d6+6 years, to a minimum of 13 years. You can't reduce something to a number lower than its stated minimum. By a plain reading of the text, you could go ahead and roll a d6+6, get some number in the range [7,12], subtract that from 9, and the result of that calculation would lie in the range [-3,2]...


67

Your players are right. An unconscious character can consume a potion administered by another player. This is held up by this sage advice entry, by Jeremy Crawford, a 5e designer. Imathil Half-Elven ‏@imathil @JeremyECrawford Can potions be administered to unconscious characters as an action? Aspirating being the issue. 10:01 PM - 18 Aug 2015 ...


66

After reading Eikre's answer, I thought, sure you can.. but what about swimming? and since I live near the beach.. So, The Answer is "with extreme difficulty" if the water is moving. Having to keep an arm free to maintain position and not get drawn to the surface or swept along with the undercurrent, does require the DEX check, determined by the waters ...


49

You cannot choose to abstain from a potion effect Potion of Healing states: You regain hit points when you drink this potion. In that language, there is no choice. Just cause and effect. You drink the potion, you regain hitpoints. If you had a choice about potion effects, then the Potion of Poison would hold no threat. This concoction[potion of ...


45

You have to be poisoned to take the damage (he is correct) The description of the Potion of Poison says: If you drink it, you take 3d6 poison damage, and you must succeed on a DC 13 Constitution saving throw or be poisoned. At the start of each of your turns while you are poisoned in this way, you take 3d6 poison damage. [...] If you don't fail the ...


43

The rues of D&D are simple: The DM describes the environment The players describe what they want to do The DM narrates the result of the character's actions So: "You are underwater" "I want to drink a potion" This is where you're getting stuck Well, I'm hypothesising that the reason you have a problem is that, on the face of it, you think the player'...


35

You can't drink part of a potion—That is, you can't drink enough to enjoy any of its effects without automatically chugging the whole thing. Page 139 of the Dungeon Master's Guide states: "Once used, a potion takes effect immediately, and it is used up." One can read this in either of two ways: Quaffing the potion takes no time (from a rules ...


34

Ok. This is a bit of a tricky one. Potions of Healing, while created of magical substance aren't actually considered magic items. Or are they. They aren't magic items Note, for instance, that they aren't listed as "magic items" in the DM book we've seen so far (BD&D DM Book pp 59-60, v.1). They are listed in the "Adventuring Gear" section of the ...


34

Drinking/administering a potion takes an action, as you cited from DMG at p.139. That's the general rule in effect, unless specifically contradicted. You note that the DMG's description of the Potion of Healing doesn't mention that it requires an action to consume, and seem to be wondering if that omission is meant to signal something. But every other ...


29

No. Drinking a potion is explicitly an action. Healing Potion:.... Drinking or administering a potion takes an action (PHB 153) You can draw the potion as a part of the action that you use to drink it, but you cannot drink it as a free action. However, it takes an action and cannot be used with the Rogue's Fast Hands ability per the DMG(p141): If an ...


29

Some “potions” are applied topically. Actually, these “potions” are called oils, and refer to things like oil of sharpness which, when poured over a piercing or slashing weapon, makes it magically sharper. All of the oils are like that: they are effects for items, not for creatures, and they are applied to the item by pouring or dunking or whatever, rather ...


28

This sort of corner case is exactly what the Golden Rule exists for, so I'd be inclined to say that you as DM should arbitrate the result as you see fit. Personally, I would be inclined to say that the potion has no immediately visible effect, but that the character would be held at his current age for several years (perhaps even the result of the die roll.)...


27

If a player does something unexpected that's not covered by the rules, just saying "there are no rules, so it does nothing" is the boring way out. That's one of the advantages of roleplaying games over other, more structured games. In our games, the usual ruling for misusing a magic item - breaking/overusing a wand, ingesting a relic, whatever - is to give ...


27

The rule is, apart from some inconsistencies with the existing mechanics, roughly fine. Basically, you're giving your players a new option to use, which is to their advantage - however, the option does have weaknesses that make it rather unattractive for frequent use. Here's some things I'd change: It should be a free object interaction You didn't specify ...


26

A Potion of Flying specifically doesn't require concentration. In page 141 of the DMG under "Spells", it specifically mentions potions as an exception to the rule of concentration: ... Many items, such as potions, bypass the casting of a spell and confer the spell's effects, with their usual duration. So, if the potion does not say it requires ...


26

Beacon of Hope affects any and all healing, including potions of healing The beacon of hope spell states: For the duration, each target [...] regains the maximum number of hit points possible from any healing.  The potion of healing states: You regain hit points when you drink this potion... Thus drinking a potion of healing would count as healing ...


25

A potion of lightning bolt would not be a legal potion. The Feat Brew Potion states which spells can be turned into potions: You can create a potion of any 3rd-level or lower spell that you know and that targets one or more creatures. Lightning bolt doesn't have a Target, only a Range and Area. If you allow potions of lightning bolt anyway, the most ...


24

Cumulative chance does mean that the chance accumulates each time, yes. Each time you drink it after the first, there is a chance that it will age you instead of youth-en you. That chance is 10% initially, but increases by 10% each time. So the first time you drink it, it has its normal effect. The second time, there's a 10% chance it has the opposite ...


24

From DMG p.139, "Most potions consist of one ounce of liquid." Just to clarify the amount of liquid we are dealing with here. From PHB p.197, "If damage reduces you to 0 hit points and does not kill you, you fall unconscious (see Appendix A). This unconsciousness ends if you regain any hit points." The most obvious answer to this would just be "Rule of Fun"...


21

Unconscious A filtered search of spells and items that include the unconscious condition on Dndbeyond.com yields only two results. Sleep effects give you the unconscious condition and include language that involves sleepiness. There are at least two spells besides Sleep that do this: Eyebite has the Asleep effect that can be imposed on a failed Wisdom ...


19

The general rules for potions only say this on the subject: A creature must be able to swallow a potion or smear on an oil. Because of this, incorporeal creatures cannot use potions or oils. Any corporeal creature can imbibe a potion or use an oil. So it seems that the answer is Yes, they can. You can argue that some corporeal but mouthless creatures ...


18

The Bottle The hardest part about this is finding a good bottle. Bottles that look like "potion bottles" aren't that easy to find most of the year. A good prop shop might have them, but often times they're found in antique stores. Another option is LARP (Live Action Roleplaying) stores. They're all about equipment and props, and some will carry potion ...


18

Unseen Servant Interacting With An Object Per page 284 of the PHB, 5e, second paragraph of the spell description. "Once on each of your tuns as a bonus action, you can mentally command the servant to move up to 15 feet and interact with an object. The servant can perform simple tasks that a human servant could do, such as fetching things, ...


18

Technically, nothing happens. The drinker's chugged what he should've applied, and claiming to have applied the magic oil on the inside doesn't count. (Unless maybe the drinker's a gully dwarf; those dudes can have weaponized innards.) Drinking oil of bless weapon wastes oil of bless weapon just as (in most cases) using oil of bless weapon as a lubricant or ...


17

Actually, I used to be a paramedic and during a cardiac arrest situation (the patient is making death saving throws), we would routinely give some drugs through the endotracheal tube (a tube, used for Oxygen delivery, that goes into the trachea). This is a thing in real life. In the D&D world where things like healing potions are, by definition, magical,...


17

Xanathar's Guide has mechanics for this. Crafting a magic item, which includes all potions, can be handled via the Downtime Activity rules in Xanathar's Guide to Everything. All of the rules in the Guide are optional, of course, so it's up to your DM if they want to use this system. In general the process is as follows, and I've emphasized what I think is ...


17

NautArch mentioned the spells Eyebite and Symbol in his answer. However, there are also a few monster features that can put others to sleep; namely the following: MM: Beholder and Death Tyrant - Sleep Ray (p. 28, 29) Brass Dragon (all ages: Wyrmling, Young, Adult, Ancient) - Sleep Breath (p. 104-106; also in SRD) Jackalwere - Sleep Gaze (p. 193) Satyr (...


17

Yes, constructs (in general) can drink potions. For reference, the construct type is described in the basic rules identically to its description in the introduction to the Monster Manual: Constructs are made, not born. Some are programmed by their creators to follow a simple set of instructions, while others are imbued with sentience and capable of ...


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