Hot answers tagged

8

I have typically (working with my GM), built a bicycle as 1 EP Equipment that grants Speed 1 rather than using Vehicle rules. That boosts my speed, and allows for Athletics checks to go faster, and also leaves the implication that I can't necessarily do it all day, that I may have to make Athletics checks to avoid getting worn out biking from place to place. ...


7

RAW, you can't get Defend the Line unless you're a Knight. Defend the Line is a utility power granted by the Fighter Stance class feature of Knights. It has no level, and thus cannot even be replaced by Acolyte Power when you multiclass. There's space for a multiclass entry feat that gives you the use of some Fighter Stances, but multiclass support is very ...


5

It makes Dragon Breath forward-compatible. Most attack powers in 4e will use the more specific nomenclature of their Close or Area targeting type to describe their targets. A close blast that targets all creatures in the blast, or an area burst that targets all creatures in the burst. However, Dragon Breath is a racial power, and one of the more common uses ...


4

Not Really The best options are ones that don't automatically allow resistance checks, like Illusion or Luck Control, or that have functions and ranks separate from PL, like Insubstantial or most Movement powers. These mean the PL 2 characters can assist a high PL character, but they can not grant the PL 2 the ability to overwhelm a high PL character. One ...


4

RAW, the only way you can get it is by Paragon Multiclassing. The entry for paragon multiclassing in the Player's Handbook (209) specifies that: At 11th level, you can choose to replace one of your at-will powers with an at-will power from your multiclass class. Note that unlike the Half Elf's Dilettante or Human bonus at will, this does not specify an ...


4

You are correct. That particular function of Crag of Steel if going to be fairly limited outside of specific party compositions (mainly ones that include PCs who give direct damage penalties or non-resist damage reduction like Aegis of Shielding). However, I'd generally classify that part as a ribbon, since, as you noted, the rest of the power is actually ...


4

Yes, this power works. You choose which one you're using each round. According to the section on Alternate Effects in the DC Adventures Hero's Handbook, you can only have one power from an array active at a time, and you can switch between active powers as a free action once per round. Alternate Effects cannot be used or maintained at the same time as other ...


4

Varies by Edition Savage Worlds has undergone numerous relatively minor revisions. Adventure Edition The most recent rules version (2019) does not contain the quoted language, at all. Instead it uses this: ADDITIONAL RECIPIENTS (+1): The power may affect more than one target for 1 additional Power Point each. That's very clear and hasn't caused any ...


4

In normal English you can, in this context, replace "a like" with "the same". Thus you can read that passage as "...The character may affect up to five targets by spending the same amount of additional Power Points." Thus if you affected 2 additional targets you would spend 2 additional Power Points. This seems to be in direct opposition to their ...


4

Immunity to a condition means ignoring that condition. A creature that is immune to a condition or other effect (such as the dazed condition or forced movement) is unaffected by the stated effect. 4e Rules Compendium, p.225 It's best to think of this as the effect still existing on you but being ignored - you can still have effects that slow, immobilize, ...


4

You're mostly stuck with at least one power in each category from your hybrid class. [I]f you have at least two powers in the same category (at-will attack, encounter attack, daily attack, or utility), at least one of those powers must come from each of your hybrid classes. For example, if you have two encounter attack powers, one of the powers must be from ...


3

No. It would increase the expense for less benefit. Reaction is meant to be used for powers that would normally take another action (like damaging someone who touched you, or emitting a psychic null zone when they detect the presence of telepaths). It lets you take a "free" action even when it's not your turn, but only under a specific circumstance (...


3

Yes, You're Getting Confused The confusion seems to stem from trying to apply Affects Others after Area. Affects Others changes a Personal range to effectively Close range. I say "effectively" because it's not an attack effect so there are some minor but important differences. Area would then center the effect on the user and affect all characters within ...


3

While not the most satisfying answer from a mechanical point, the most likely answer is that you simply designate the high-power systems for the main grounds, and lower power ones for the surrounding area, as worked out with your GM. Headquarters are generally not the main thrust of the plot, so the game doesn't really go into great detail on them. There is ...


3

Attack Penalties The arcane skill roll is both the activation roll (TN 4) and the attack roll. Penalties that affect the casting, and can prevent the power from activating, are Wounds, Fatigue, and other penalties that apply to any power. Penalties to arcane ranged attacks (Cover, Illumination, Arcane Resistance, arcane protection, etc.) still apply to ...


2

It would more or less work in the exact same way, requiring a particular level of bonus to get through. If you have Impervious on all 10 ranks of your Will save, it will block all effects of Rank 5 or less that require a Will save. If you have Impervious 10 on your Dodge, a Ranged attack would need at least a +5 bonus to hit you. Unfortunately, I've yet to ...


2

While Sean Duggan's answer is very good, and the way I'd handle this in my own games, the other approach is to build the bicycle as a vehicle. Size Medium Strength 1 Speed 2 (3 racer) Toughness 6 Equipment Points: 4 (5 racer)


2

In addition to what's stated in ValhallaGH's answer, to be able to summon different types of minions, you need the Variable Type extra, possibly two ranks if they really vary a lot. Variable Type: Minions are normally identical in terms of traits, although they may differ cosmetically. With this modifier you can summon different minions of a general type (...


2

There is no hard limit to the ranks of Summon you can have (unlike the Sidekick Advantage). There are soft limits, based upon your character's available power points / character points and the power level of your minion(s), but those are not hard limits. The ONLY way to summon more than one minion with Summon is the Multiple Minions modifier (which you can ...


2

This was a matter clarified in 2e by Steve Kenson: Miles Craven wrote: I want to create a character who can generate a forcefield in an area around himself, protecting everyone in the radius. Obviously, this is Force Field with the Area (likely Burst) extra. I assume that I have to also take the Affects Others extra at the +1 modifier, since the ...


2

No, But ... Your confusion comes from ignoring half of the sentence. Your effect can inflict damage, like an application of normal Strength with damage equal to its rank. When using Move Object with the damaging extra, it can be used like Strength to deal damage equal to the effect rank. The Move Object effect isn't made of fire, or similar automatic ...


2

The Mind’s Eye article “Expanded Classes, Part Four” includes guidance for Substitute Powers in a psionic mantle. Since an ardent’s power list is the list of powers found on their chosen mantles, substituting the powers on a mantle changes the power list for that character. I don’t believe there is any other method. The existence of the Expanded Knowledge ...


2

TL;DR (in order) Yes, it would have to be an object of some sort. Only what the GM decides to impose on people carrying things, and of course PL limits. None unless you add one. Longer Answer If you are using an Affects Others effect on a Device, then you could use a Standard action to give that set of powers to a given target and it would be present as ...


2

Rather than Triggered, I'd suggest Activation, which imposes an action to prepare a power before using it with its actual action, which works fairly decently for "take time to memorize the spell". The rules do not really cover how long that power stays up, or under what circumstances, but I generally treat it as a Sustained situation such that it's possible ...


2

Like any Area attack, it allows a Dodge resistance to mitigate the effect. Which you noted in the question. Most anti-gravity effects are Move Object (as Sean Duggan noted), which can be resisted with Strength or Dodge (per Grab attacks in the Action & Adventure Chapter). For a Flight effect, you'll need to choose an appropriate resistance. If the ...


2

No. As you note, extended senses just improve your ability to perceive things at a greater distance. It's still more difficult to hit something that's further away (scope wobble is magnified over distance, wind, bullet drop, more time for your target to have moved since you fired, etc) even if you can see them more clearly. You'd be looking at applying the ...


2

As you've noted, the wording is vague. The group I'm part of (which I believe is the largest 4e community still active), however, actually went with option 3, which is that the target cannot move, in any way, to a square that is not adjacent to the battlemind that lodestone lured it. This sounds like your option 1, however, forced movement is still movement. ...


2

You have to wait until level 6. Your instincts are steering you wrong here - literally everything that lets you swap a power is going to be more specific than the general rule about swapping powers. The general rule should be assumed to apply unless a specific rule explicitly contradicts it - like if the skill power rules said "even your last class ...


2

"Specific beats general" is a specific case of a more general principle. That principle is "every rule has a reason to exist". That is, if you invalidate a rule simply by choosing to read the rules with a certain order of precedence, you should choose a different reading. For example, in the PHB's example of the principle (p.11): For ...


2

When you "multiclass", you're still only your original class. Unlike a hybrid, which counts as both of its hybrid classes for all purposes, someone who's taken a class-specific multiclass feat only counts as that class for certain prerequisites. For example, consider Baron Geoff, a Warlord who's taken Student of the Sword, a Fighter multiclass feat,...


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