Hot answers tagged

144

I spent several years making document props for my D&D group on the cheap, and here's my learning: Browning paper gives the least effect for the most effort when ageing a document. Don’t think “age,” think “history of abuse.” Ageing a document is about mimicking the history of that piece of paper. Before you start ageing it, you need to have at least a ...


88

Fantasy Coins You've probably already seen the various fantasy coin vendors around the internet. They sell interesting fantasy coins, some do custom jobs. The problem is that these are far beyond the price you specified - if you want. Some people produce plastic coins, these could be an alternative. Oriental Trading sells inexpensive, mass produced ...


66

In my mind, a good LARP coin should have the following characteristics : Heavy : it should at least feel like metal coins in your pouch Metal : it should sound like coins Cheap : LARPs are costly enough to run as it is... Easily replaceable : you'll lose some eventually, and if they are custom order and take 6-8 weeks to arrive, you might not be able to ...


42

Just Age A paper document, as it ages, has 4 effects of note that are standard: it has acid degradation it has in ink migration or ink/toner de-fixation it suffers in oxidation of ink it becomes brittle Parchment, being a subset of leather, has similar issues, but in different order: Ink migration Ink oxidation brittleness browning Vellum can be either a ...


33

Cinnamon. Use adhesive to paint the parts where you want rust, pour on cinnamon and seal it off with a clear coat. It will not smell like rust, but it will look good enough for most practical cases and is safe. Experiment with a bit of color in the cinnamon to get variations. This was used a lot in the swedish post-ap LARP "Blodsband", to the point ...


29

One of the reasons people play RPGs is to (pretend to) do things that they can't in real life. If I picked up a sword, I'd have even odds of injuring myself more than the other guy; but, in an RPG, I can play a Fighter who wields a sword with aplomb. I may not be able to tell an enthralling story, but, in an RPG, I can play a Bard who can keep an audience ...


25

If you have traditional writing utensils, you can use milk or lemon juice as ink. Both work pretty well with simple nib. I prefer lemon juice, because there is less chance for it to rot. Get some juice Filter it to obtain clear liquid Use nib pen to write what you want When the time comes, tell your player to heat his character sheet over a candle. Gently! ...


24

Use rust It might sound mad, but you can use actual rust! But not the type made on the item, but you can buy rust as a pigment. To apply it, I prefer to gently powder and brush the dry pigment into a thin layer of glue called "Anlegemilch" (Gilding Dispersion), the same stuff one would use for adding leaf metal. That stuff takes about 20 minutes to ...


20

I've used these prop coins in my tabletop role-playing games. They're lightweight and disposable but nonetheless durable and have held up for years albeit with some wear (the paint tends to flake a little when abused). They're even about the correct size (a little larger than a quarter but smaller than a half-dollar). 144 cost $5.95 from this supplier.


18

The Bottle The hardest part about this is finding a good bottle. Bottles that look like "potion bottles" aren't that easy to find most of the year. A good prop shop might have them, but often times they're found in antique stores. Another option is LARP (Live Action Roleplaying) stores. They're all about equipment and props, and some will carry potion ...


16

While writing my previous answer, I realized there's another way... Regular balloons. Attached to the end of a stick (a telescoping stick, possibly - repurpose a selfie stick?) a significant number of normal balloons could be held above the participant such that they're engulfed. Indoors, a small fan could lend them some additional direction, maybe one ...


13

Crumple it, cover it with tea and then put it in the oven http://www.wikihow.com/Age-Paper-Using-Tea Aged paper has 3 main characteristics, depending on how long it has been aged. 1) Creased/crumpled/torn. 2) Yellowed. 3) Old style writing. The first can most quickly be met by scrunching it up, or more realistically by carrying it around for a while in ...


13

I don't off hand know a place to find them but I have a UV pen. The ink lasts for a long time on paper and you can't see it until you use a UV light of some kind. I think you can try making your own but it shouldn't be too hard to find. The one I have came with a UV light attached just write on the paper and when it's time use the UV light to show the ...


13

These are called "tokens" (sometimes "creature tokens" or "monster tokens") and are widely available in PDF at all fine purveyors of roleplaying games PDFs, such as RPGNow. Normally these are used with virtual tabletop software or printed onto card stock and cut out for use on a real tabletop, but if you have access to an appropriate printer and transparent ...


12

You're probably looking for "Mardi Gras coins". They cost less than $5/gross. Here's one of the first Google results I got, though you may want to look around for different æsthetic options.


12

For preface purposes, you should know that I've been LARPing for 15 years. First and foremost, your question is difficult to answer because although you've stated some criteria about your demons, you haven't said what you want them to look like. That aside, there are a few things that I can advise you with. I am making the following assumptions based on ...


11

I can't hope to match BESW's amazing answer, but I have tested these methods over the years, and they work pretty well. The most important part is to determine how you want to age the paper. What was its history? Was it sheltered, or weathered? Is it ancient, or just beat-up? Is it on expensive paper, or a scrap of who-knows-what? If the paper is a page ...


11

Chemistry supply shops or restaurant/bar supply stores may carry test-tube like vials, and maybe even some corks that will fit. If you don't actually want the players to drink somethink out of them, you can fill them with epoxy resin from a hobby store, and color it with any kind of pigments you like. You could mix glitter, into the expoxy, or even small ...


11

You are exactly right, the material characteristics of expanded foam after it is cured are not suitable for LARPS weapons. PU foam is, however, good for making props due to the ability to get it into a rough shape and then carve in the fine details. However to paint it and preserve you need to do some extra steps by adding layers of painter tape, and paper ...


11

When I've seen things like this done it's generally done in a contained area such as a marquee/gazebo/etc. Attach most of the things on static strings hanging from the ceiling. Have a bunch more attached to strings that can run up and down, have a monster with a handful of strings they can pull on to move them like a puppet master. (Attach a fixed string ...


11

Which of these interpretations of the definition of a cone's area of effect is the correct one to base my template design and construction on? Answer: Option 1 You say: The problem is that the rules for the shape of a cone AoE aren't very precise, and when you start looking at them closely, there are a bunch of inconsistencies. and There are three ...


11

The issue here seems to be one of contrasting playstyles - you and most of your party enjoy lots of roleplaying with props and whatnot, and the other player does not. As seems to be the case with most questions containing the Problem Players tag, the first step should always be to have an open discussion with your group to see whether or not people actually ...


10

I created another large monster for one of our large larps in New Zealand. We named him "Boris" while we were building him and the name stuck. The guy wearing it is about 6'3" and he looks out the mouth. He's constructed from five foam mattresses that are about 4" thick. They're rolled into tubes and glued using a special contact adhesive recommended by ...


10

When I used to do pirate LARP we used the guts of a Nerf gun for this. Someone had built or acquired a little gun carriage and dummy cannon and we put the Nerf launcher plus (painted) rocket in it, with a little talcum powder inside the rocket for smoke effects. Pulling a string launched the rocket. The advantages of this are that the firing mechanism is ...


10

I've been making LARP weapons for 20 years so I've seen this a fair bit. Latex is pretty hard to damage with most paints. Anything with copper in though will cause latex to decompose, rate dependent on how much copper is present. Really solvent heavy paints might damage latex a bit but I've never seen it melt. The biggest problem you'll have is getting ...


10

Well, you're hitting the real-world disadvantages of crossbows. You aren't hitting the real-world disadvantages of bows, which is that using them at long range takes a lot more skill and strength than using a crossbow at that range. If you were able to introduce more long-range combats, crossbows should become more worthwhile, but your limitations on draw ...


10

Depending on what the sun looks like to you, 24 or 38 dice; 2 bricks exactly, or a little over 3. (Chessex sells 16mm dice in packages of 12. This is "a brick of dice" in my idiolect.) The A6 page is 4 1/8 inches wide, so using the scan of the printed zine as a starting point: (ruler distorted by perspective; the best zoom I could get had the page ...


9

What you could use is something similar to what I've used in airsoft; an RPG launcher which uses a 40mm gas grenade to fire nerf rockets. We used these for attacking vehicles (One of the players had a BMP-1) as well as land rovers. It should be pretty easy to replicate one of these things; you basically need a tube that would fit a 40mm gas grenade that ...


9

Since you are new to GMing, I will first congratulate you on your bravery... The situation you face is one that presents a number of challenges, but one that can yield great results. You need to realize that not all players are comfortable and interested in too much of that. Use of props can greatly enhance the session, but they can also become a ...


9

There are no mechanical descriptions (for PCs) of the Tarokka deck in the current edition. Looking at Curse of Strahd and Van Richten's Guide to Ravenloft (and using D&D Beyond to search through other official sources), the deck doesn't appear as an Item with any associated actions, abilities or mechanics. They appear in the stat block of a character in ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible