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2

For an officially published approach: Out of the Abyss (roughly chapter 2), has a longer chase section, not with towns, but that could be adapted in as it is weeks or possibly months long. Basically: the DM tracks a score of how close the chasers are, and rolls daily on random events, which can raise or lower the score (also dependent on how the players ...


2

You can introduce setbacks, or give players "short cuts," enabling them to effectively catch the villain. If the villain is a considerable distance away, and they have any indication of where he has been, they could cut him off from ahead if another road led to his location. Alternatively, the villain may have had a number of horses die in a rock ...


4

I recommend making the chase less like the one in LoTR The Two Towers and more like a sort of scavenger hunt. One hint leads to another. The party tries to retrace the steps of the villain, but are not actively chasing right behind them. Otherwise, the players will try their hardest to catch up, which might not be as viable or fun as investigating where the ...


8

My suggestion maybe seems a bit railroady... ...but your players won't necessarily know. I DMed some chases (it was my home-brew system, but that issue is interchangeable)... and every time I started by writing an end for this situation or at least had some scenes in mind where it could be possible to catch the target. The first chases I DMed were roll/skill-...


4

The game of ToA I've been playing in has been going for seven months (One 5-6 hour session per week) since I joined, and the rest of the party was around level 5 at that point - we are now up to level 10. So far, we had one full party wipe and one where only two of our 5 survived. We entered the last dungeon of the campaign about three sessions ago, but our ...


1

The Tome of Strahd is mostly a roleplay item but it serves a variety of functions if you understand how to use it: It confirms just how much of a scumbag he really is. Players likely know he’s a villain, but they don’t know how far his villainy goes. The Dark Powers turned him into a vampire. That much is true. But he never reveals his part in it. Ireena/...


2

Your problem, as I see it is: You have a group running through a hardcover set of adventures with rotating DMs, who would like to preserve the mystery of each sub-adventure for those who will be playing, while also having enough information to make informed decisions on which sub-adventures each person who wants to is comfortable to DM. Broadly, I can see ...


5

By my calculation, this is only a hard encounter for six 5th level characters. The total xp of those monsters is 3600, and there are 5 monsters. Normally for 5 monsters, you multiply the xp by 2 for the purpose of measuring encounter difficulty, but we see this rule in the calculation guidance: If the party contains six or more characters, use the next ...


5

It depends on the party's make up (*Based on the original question, location 12) The party I DM'd for in that one handled it pretty well. Here's the line up: 1 Barbarian, Bear Totem 1 Sorcerer, Shadow Magic 1 Druid, Shepherd 1 Artificer, Artillerist 1 Monk, Drunken Master Tactical Points: artificer's protector canon was up, and the Monk Stunned the twice. ...


19

I just finished running this section a few weeks ago. First, it helps if you read the whole entry. Also, remember that the entries cannot cover every possible contingency; this section is too dynamic. The description of room 20 reads (p. 75): A lizardfolk shaman is leading two disciples (lizardfolk) in a short prayer to Semuanya. If the party arrives here ...


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