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65

You can normally take reactions on your own turn, which includes reacting to things you are doing to yourself. Note though that Featherfall isn't reacting to a spell you cast; it's reacting to you falling. It shouldn't make a difference whether you step off a cliff or cast a spell; one of its designed uses is to save you from splattering when you find ...


64

If your whole party jumps off a cliff combat has ended There is the unlikely scenario where the enemy jump after them, but as soon as the party declare their intention to jump off a cliff and feather fall to a safe landing you can immediately drop initiative and just narrate what happens afterwards; "you all jump off the cliff and the wizard casts ...


62

Protection does not grant additional opportunity attacks The Protection is one of the options for a Fighter's fighting style. It allows, exactly as you quoted, to use one's reaction to impose disadvantage on enemy attack rolls under certain conditions. It doesn't say anything about giving additional ways to make an opportunity attack, and hence it doesn't ...


59

It depends on your table "Reactions" are a game concept, it's not something your character is aware of. So it depends entirely on what kind of seperation of in-character and meta-knowledge your game table uses. There is no real right or wrong answer here, even if you do not allow meta knowledge, your character might still be able to realize this ...


57

Depending on the context of the encounter, the following quote from the PHB, page 189, might be relevant: Surprise If you're surprised, you can't move or take an action on your first turn of the combat, and you can't take a reaction until that turn ends. So if the Rogue's sneaky stabby is the start of the combat and the Wizard wasn't expecting him, he isn'...


56

The narration of the event seems strange to you because you are confusing the planned order of events with the actual order of events. The plan was that the encounter begins when A throws their dagger. So if the characters had followed the plan then the order of events for round 1 would have been: X does nothing because they don't know they are in an ...


56

Disengaging and not provoking opportunity attacks is a big part of some classes, features, abilities and tactics, such as: Class features like Monks' Step of the Wind & Rogues' Cunning Action Mobile feat An important feature of Slow spell is to disable opportunity attack (among other reactions) Just plain tactics like the tank barbarian provoking the ...


53

I ready my movement until Sorcerer's turn to walk off the cliff. You are correct to observe that feather fall can be tricky to coordinate during the heat of battle, and that without proper coordination, it would indeed take several castings across multiple rounds. But there is an easy way around this: Ready. The Ready action is described in the Actions in ...


52

Unfortunately, as awesome as this sounds, by the rules, it doesn't work. Hellish Rebuke is a reaction that you take in response to being damaged Not "in response to being hit", or "in response to being attacked". You actually have to take damage to use it. Whenever a creature takes damage, that damage is subtracted from its hit points. You haven't ...


52

You only have one reaction per round The bottom line here is that a PC only has one reaction, as kviiri's answer also states. From the rules of Reactions: When you take a reaction, you can't take another one until the start of your next turn. If the reaction interrupts another creature's turn, that creature can continue its turn right after the reaction. ...


50

Reactions come after their triggers, except when they don't If the timing is specified in the ability, use that timing. Otherwise, reactions occur after the trigger. This entire thing is a matter of specific over general. In 5e, when a specific rule and a general rule conflict, the specific rule wins. Xanathar's Guide to Everything outlines the general ...


50

There are abilities/actions that use "reactions" that don't need to be prepared. Opportunity attacks are attacks that use your reaction, but don't have to be prepared before it is taken. You just get to decide if you want to use your reaction to make an opportunity attack when/if an enemy leaves themselves open for one. There are also some spells (the 1st ...


49

You've already stated the key point: 1 reaction, which you take when you are hit by an attack or targeted by the magic missile spell. So what you need to understand here is that the Shield spell involves time travel. No, really, it does. You can cast Shield when you're hit by an attack. Not when you're targeted, or when someone tries to attack you, but ...


49

Reactions can be taken on your turn. A reaction is an instant response to a trigger of some kind, which can occur on your turn or on someone else's. PHB, pg.190 Therefore, yes, you can cast Shield as a reaction if you provoke an opportunity attack on your turn.


47

You are correct, reaction spells cannot be readied or precast Reaction spells are cast as a reaction in response to a trigger that is spelled out in the spell description. In the case of shield, that trigger is "when you are hit by an attack or targeted by the magic missile spell". When that triggers occurs, you can cast the spell and spend the ...


41

Yes, That Description is RAW That is the way mechanics happens in RAW. How you narrate that to make sense is up to you. Remember the rules have to be turn based to make it run and everything that happens in a round is happening inside 6 seconds and at roughly at the "same time". Two Common Alternatives There are two common alternatives I've seen: ...


40

The maximum number of spells a character can cast in a round is 3. You can only take 1 reaction per round, although some monsters have an ability that allows them to ignore this restriction. You can't cast another spell during the same turn, except for a cantrip with a casting time of 1 action. This means that you can cast a bonus action spell and a ...


37

Squishier creatures will be harder to protect The largest, most general consequence will be that frontliners will have a harder time protecting their squishier allies. In my experience, both PC and enemy groups almost always travel through dangerous areas with tankier melee characters in front and squishier casters and ranged characters in back. Normally, ...


36

The rules for Multiattack in the Monster Manual (page 11) are perfectly clear: A creature that can make multiple attacks on its turn has the Multiattack ability. A creature can’t use Multiattack when making an opportunity attack, which must be a single melee attack. Or, in other words, it works exactly the same way as Extra Attack, and can't be ...


36

Yes Nothing in the ready or opportunity attack rules suggest that they're mutually exclusive beyond using one's reaction, which is only used when actually making the opportunity attack or taking the readied action. Therefore, you can forgo the option to use the readied fireball to make an opportunity attack if you wish and circumstances permit. Using one's ...


35

The rules for reactions are fairly straightforward: Certain special abilities, spells, and situations allow you to take a special action called a reaction. A reaction is an instant response to a trigger of some kind, which can occur on your turn or on someone else's. The opportunity attack, described later in this section, is the most common type of ...


34

You can prepare Dispel Magic to instantly dispel whatever spell a spellcaster casts. However, this will not "counter" their spell, rather, it will dispel it as soon as they cast it. So any spell with a duration of Instantaneous will be unaffected. This will only end the ongoing effects of spells which create ongoing effects. This is not at all the ...


33

According to this tweet by Mike Mearls, you're supposed to know with certainty whether the shield is enough to protect you or not, so that you can't waste the spell, unless you choose to: Querent: Am I right..Wiz should know roll before using Shield,cant 'waste it' from not knowing roll? Mike Mearls: correct This is also how I have seen it be done in ...


33

The knight's parry ability uses its reaction therefore it follows the usual reaction rules found on page 190 of the PHB: [...] When you take a reaction, you can't take another one until the start of your next turn.


33

You can take reactions outside of combat. As evidence of being able to take a reaction in response to a relevant trigger outside of combat, consider the spell feather fall: Choose up to five falling creatures within range. A falling creature's rate of descent slows to 60 feet per round until the spell ends. If the creature lands before the spell ends, it ...


31

No. If the casting time of a spell is 1 reaction, you can only cast it using your reaction (unless you benefit from a special feature that lets you do otherwise). This is because there is no general rule that lets you change the casting time of a spell from 1 reaction to 1 action. There's nothing I can cite that confirms that because it's impossible to prove ...


31

You can't take both Dash and Ready actions Normally you don't "prepare a reaction". You take the Ready action instead. See Player's Handbook, page 193, "Actions in Combat" Sometimes you want to get the jump on a foe or wait for a particular circumstance before you act. To do so, you can take the Ready action on your turn so that you can act later ...


31

No, War Caster doesn't let you do this Unfortunately, the benefit that War Caster offers is specifically that: When a hostile creature's movement provokes an opportunity attack from you, you can use your reaction to cast a spell at the creature, rather than making an opportunity attack. The spell must have a casting time of 1 action and must target only ...


30

The hostile creature’s movement doesn't provoke an opportunity attack from you, so your War Caster feat isn't triggered. The War Caster feat (PHB 170) says: When a hostile creature’s movement provokes an opportunity attack from you, you can use your reaction to cast a spell at the creature, rather than making an opportunity attack. The spell must ...


29

Shield cannot be used as a reaction to damage 5th edition generally does a good job choosing language that deliberately interacts with other language (especially for the "core" set of rules: Monster Manual, Players Handbook, and Dungeon Masters Guide). So, let's take another look at the abilities in question: Fire Form ...[snip] A creature that ...


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