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67

Rules-As-Written, you can't catch an arrow that is aimed at another Your quoted text is pretty explicit about it, you have to be the target and you have to get hit in order to use the feature, that means if the attacker misses, you can't use Deflect Missiles. On the Readied Action question, it wouldn't work either. Two things: Deflect Missiles is a ...


57

You were right! In that type of situation, everyone is ready to begin fighting at any moment. Everyone basically is 'readying' for their fight - not just the PCs. Readied Actions These actions do require a trigger to be specifically stated, as well as the action they will take if triggered. In a general situation, most Readied Actions take place during ...


51

No The 'Extra Attack' feature is worded so you only benefit from it when you attack in your turn. Beginning at 5th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn Reacting to something is not in your turn, it's in the turn of the triggering creature.


51

No Two reasons. First of all, RAW doesn't mention any effects of the spell being effective while it is being held. There's no fire before the spell is actually released. The more significant reason is that you can't hold a spell indefinitely; any readied action will be lost at the beginning of the character's next turn. See the Player's Handbook Errata: ...


49

The contentious part of this question is the trigger for the Readied Action The relevant rule for setting the trigger for a Readied Action is as follows: When the trigger occurs, you can either take your reaction right after the trigger finishes or ignore the trigger. (PHB p. 193) Xanathar's Guide to Everything elaborates further: If you’re unsure ...


46

Yes you can Ready an action you currently cannot do The rules for Readying say: First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to it. Readying doesn't involve doing anything at all at the time that you ...


45

That sounds like a reasonable use of Ready. Here's the relevant rules text (my emphasis): First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to it. A character can (usually, see below) perceive when another ...


44

Silence does nothing to a readied disintegrate When you ready a spell, you cast it as normal but hold its energy, which you release with your reaction when the trigger occurs. The disintegrate has already been fully cast and its power held. All the components have already been performed including any verbal components which silence could have disrupted (...


41

The action you described is not really a readied action. It's more like a "colorful" Dodge Action. Either dodge or a readied action will cost one action - they are equivalent in game mechanics. If the player wants this to be a readied action, there's no reason to correct them on the term. Disguising the Dodge action as a readied action You can indulge ...


41

No, because the Ready Action requires you to cast the spell as normal and then hold it, releasing it with your reaction later. You are using your action to cast the spell on your turn. PHB pg. 193 under Ready, emphasis mine: When you ready a spell, you cast it as normal but hold its energy, which you release with your reaction when the trigger occurs. ...


40

No, you can't do that. Purely mechanical events like "at the end of my turn" or "before your turn" are not legal triggers (PHB, p. 193, emphasis mine): Ready […] First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. That means that only things that your character could perceive make for legal triggers. So, say we have two PCs ...


40

There are no explicit rules for this, but what has worked for me and my table is to describe, briefly, what it looks like. E.g. "The Kobold waits, weapon drawn, and looking at you." With my group, this is often enough of a clue as to what the creature has prepared. If not, I would allow a character to use Insight to figure out more detail, such as whether ...


39

Your Turn On your turn, you can move and perform an action. The ready action is, as you point out, an action like any other. This means that on your turn you can move and take the ready action. The Ready Action The ready action allows you to react to a specific, "perceivable circumstance." To do so, you can take the Ready action on your turn so that ...


38

Your example is somewhat flawed. If Bob readies an action to attack Alice as soon as she's within reach, and then moves within reach, it's just a normal move/attack sequence. No Readying is necessary, in which case Alice resolves her readied attack as soon as Bob is within reach and then Bob acts. Let's go with another example. Alice has the best ...


38

There's nothing in the Ready action description that would prevent readying Disengage. When you ready an action you: decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to it. The perceivable circumstance is that the ...


38

Yes, but you can only act on one of them Action Surge allows you to: take one additional action on top of your regular action There are no restrictions on what you can do with this action, so taking the Ready action qualifies. Taking the Ready action spends one action but there is nothing preventing the use of a second action to take another one on the ...


37

Yes, and they don't need to ready an action to do it Say their movement is 30ft. They expend their movement for 30ft, use their action to Dash for an extra 30ft, then Bonus action to Dash again with an additional 30ft. 90ft in total - triple their base movement Here's a question that covers Dashing twice on the same round: Can you dash twice on the same ...


36

Yes, you do The Readied action doesn't trigger until after your trigger completes: When the trigger occurs, you can either take your reaction right after the trigger finishes or ignore the trigger. When you ready a spell, you are concentrating on that spell as you hold it (PHB, 193) When you ready a spell, you cast it as normal but hold its energy, ...


34

Yes Nothing in the ready or opportunity attack rules suggest that they're mutually exclusive beyond using one's reaction, which is only used when actually making the opportunity attack or taking the readied action. Therefore, you can forgo the option to use the readied fireball to make an opportunity attack if you wish and circumstances permit. Using one's ...


33

The recently released Player's Handbook Errata clarifies this: Ready (p. 193). You have until the start of your next turn to use a readied action.


33

The rules for Multiattack in the Monster Manual (page 11) are perfectly clear: A creature that can make multiple attacks on its turn has the Multiattack ability. A creature can’t use Multiattack when making an opportunity attack, which must be a single melee attack. Or, in other words, it works exactly the same way as Extra Attack, and can't be ...


32

You can prepare Dispel Magic to instantly dispel whatever spell a spellcaster casts. However, this will not "counter" their spell, rather, it will dispel it as soon as they cast it. So any spell with a duration of Instantaneous will be unaffected. This will only end the ongoing effects of spells which create ongoing effects. This is not at all the same as "...


31

You can ready one attack without breaking invisibility, but not a spell. Readying an action allows you to use your action to act outside of your turn. This allows you to ready an attack action which you will execute later. Once you do execute it, you will have made an attack and will break invisibility. Note that it doesn't matter if you make your attack ...


31

It does not work, but not for the reason you think Two concentrations Readying a spell needs concentration, so your readied Blade Ward end the moment you start casting Haste (which also needs concentration). As soon as you start casting a spell or using a special ability that requires concentration, your concentration on another effect ends instantly. ...


31

The wizard can't Ready a spell before combat begins The wizard can cast spells during her first round, but she can't release a readied spell before her first round because she can't Ready a spell before combat begins. As Jeremy Crawford clarified: The options, including Ready, in the "Actions in Combat" section (PH, 192–93) are meant to be used in ...


29

You can't take both Dash and Ready actions Normally you don't "prepare a reaction". You take the Ready action instead. See Player's Handbook, page 193, "Actions in Combat" Sometimes you want to get the jump on a foe or wait for a particular circumstance before you act. To do so, you can take the Ready action on your turn so that you can act later ...


29

Yes, you can ready actions you are not currently capable of performing* (*Well, you can't ready a spell that you were not capable of casting, but I don't know how that would come up.) What are the requirements for readying? (emphasis mine) First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will ...


29

No. Readying actions is not how you should handle an ambush. It is a mistake for the DM to allow players to spend actions (by readying an action to use later) before combat has started. Until you roll for initiative, gameplay isn't broken up into actions in that way. Instead, the DM should rule that the Orcs are surprised by the players, who have set up an ...


29

Yes. The Ready action specifies that When you ready a spell, you cast it as normal but hold its energy, which you release with your reaction when the trigger occurs. So when you take the Ready action to ready a spell, you have, in fact, used your action to cast a bard spell. You have "cast the spell as normal," RAW. This seems to fulfill the ...


28

Yes. Your inference, that Targeting is part of Casting and therefore can't be done at time of effect, is a little tenuous. And, given the examples for readying a spell, it seems likely that the intent is to let you target it on release: When you ready a spell, you cast it as normal but hold its energy, which you release with your reaction when the ...


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