52

Some quick searches show me that the internet is full of historical accounts, movies, TV-shows, and stories about kings, rulers, and other such nobility and what they do during their day. I am sure you are aware of this as well, so I understand that you want an answer in the context of a role playing game. The King can do whatever he wants Regardless of ...


33

I believe the answer would be no, and here's why: I firmly agree with the statement "No major crime committed would go unpunished." Major crimes being public manslaughter, openly aggressive acts of vandalism/robbery, kidnappings, or the like. This is due to two factors. 1: Most persons capable of committing these crimes would likely realize who and what ...


32

Downtime rules for running a business are the best official option right now Effectively, what you are trying to do is run a pirating business. Luckily, in chapter 7 of the DMG there are rules for using downtime to run a business. Running a Business Adventurers can end up owning businesses that have nothing to do with delving into dungeons or saving the ...


30

My first recommendation: Don't do that... At least not the way you're describing. Entrepreneurship has never been one of D&D's strong-suits. If it were me, I'd have a little bit of roleplay and hand-waving for the party to set up the new pirate king and make nice with the rest of the organization. Maybe a small check cut to the PC's every season/year ...


23

You have one of the best problems to have as a 3.X GM. If there's a certain part of the game world that the players clearly want to engage with, then you have an easy way to give players exactly the kind of content that they want. Here is some advice on how to handle this new castle. Don't use the Kingdom Building rules It's really tempting to use a set of ...


20

Farms aren't individual farms in that passage, they're a type of change to the hex. You can only add farms to a hex once—after that, the hex has farms.


20

Pathfinder includes kingdom building rules that were initially introduced in the Kingmaker Adventure Path (which is a prewritten campaign that sounds a lot like what you are describing). Being a traditional Fantasy D20 game, it handles non-human races without a problem. The system handles exploring and claiming land, building settlements (and specific ...


18

You are describing something I have quite a bit of interest in. Check the number of questions tagged realm-management for related information. I would suggest a pair of games to meet your needs: First, the winner and still champion... Reign Reign contains detailed rules for Companies - organizations ranging from a gang to an empire. The linked Reign ...


16

Once a henchman is given a domain, they're no longer a henchman, they're a vassal. Think about it this way. Ser John the Great gives his loyal spear-carrier Walden a title over the Barony of Thicke. Lord Walden of Thicke becomes a peer of another Baron who was never Ser John's henchman, Baron Gwynedd. Baron Gwynedd has income, land, peasants, and all kinds ...


16

Change the tags When the world changes, the mechanical notes we keep to represent the world perforce also change. Dungeon World's mechanics and sheets are prescriptive and descriptive, so when something mechanically changes on the sheet it (prescriptively) changes the world, but also when the world changes, the sheet must be changed to (descriptively) match ...


14

I ran this a couple of years ago. Here are some of the problems we encountered. Don't spread out too far as the DCs go up by 1 for every hex you claim. Build up your city with lots of buildings first. ((TIP: Buildings that generate items are the best way to make BP)) Don't withdraw money from the kingdom to spend on equipment. Seriously, it will unbalance ...


14

Treat the organisation like a character. Give it a stress track and consequence slots (if it runs out of stress and can't absorb it with consequences then it is taken out and becomes the smouldering remains you mention in the question). Then give it stunts and/or skills of its own. As it improves, it gains stunts / skills. As it gets weaker it takes stress ...


12

First and Foremost the King needs to remain king... As you note you could as king effectively delegate ALL of your responsibilities away leaving you endless leisure time. Beyond the moral or philosophical issues with that scenario there is the very real political and personal danger this engenders. If everyone sees the kingdom running swell without the king'...


12

Officially, you are better with a Lyre of Building than trying to find rules for undead laborer to build towns. The topic of wether mindless creatures can take simple orders or not is subject to GM fiat and normally will see table variation. Now, if you happen to be interested on what Jason Nelson, the creator of the original kingdom building system for the ...


12

There's almost rules Actually, not quite. There aren't rules for building or maintaining roads, and certainly not which makes considerations for environment. D&D 5e trusts this kind of adjustments for your (the DM's) good sense. That said you have some guidance to base yourself on. The Building A Stronghold section in the Dungeon Master's Guide (p. 128) ...


11

See Realm Management Rules That Work and What rpgs are focused on kingdom building and what sort of mechanics are used in each system? for a variety of kingdom building rulesets you can crib for your game. Like, you could graft the REIGN kingdom system on top if you were willing to do some work. Some of those answers also mention 3.5e supplements and ...


11

Note that I have only just glanced over the Kingdom Builder rules, but I see two aspects to this question. On the one hand, as was stated by SevenSidedDie earlier, which I will just full quote here for simplicity and completeness: Farms aren't individual farms in that passage, they're a type of change to the hex. You can only add farms to a hex once—after ...


11

Greg Stolze's Reign is pretty much right up your alley here. Though its rules for "companies" (or really any organization) are written more with the assumption that the PCs jointly run a single organization, I've played in (and seen) more games that fit your description than the "standard" play. And the political side is run objectively enough that the GM ...


11

There are no such rules The books that deal with these closest are Guide to the Technocracy and Convention Book: Void Engineers. However, neither go in any great detail about the leadership level, and certainly don't include specific rules on leadership actions. That said, the listed books do offer guidance in that regard; they do include some discussion ...


11

I agree with the other answers, in that you should not overcomplicate things. However an important thing to note is that pirates weren't really salaried. If you look at historic pirate codes, then you find a lot of talk about shares and "no prey, no pay". In other words, what each individual pirate got, from the lowliest sailor up to the captain, was a ...


10

Yes, see the DMG, p 127. There is no brothel, but the closest version, a city side inn, costs 10 gp a day, and requires 5 skilled hirelings and 10 unskilled hirelings. A moneylender sounds like a shop, which costs 2gp a day, and requires just one skilled hireling. You then roll a 1d100, plus any days spent in downtime on it, up to +30, and earn an ...


9

Legends of Anglerre Legends of Anglerre is a med-fan somewhat crunchier adaptation of the Fate rules, with a large section dedicated to organization management and conflict. Setting: the book has two sample settings, a low magic one and a high magic one, but the rules are made to fit more or less any medieval-fantasy setting. I personally run it in the ...


9

This sounds almost like something we did in one of Jeff Richard’s games, though I think we switched from character-centric to clan-centric briefly to do it. (Also, like a Sartar tribal council game Greg Stafford wrote up.) We used the HeroQuest rules, which do have a section on running communities. I don’t think they explicitly handle everything you’re ...


9

The Steading rules don't concern themselves with creating kingdoms (or duchies, baronies, counties, marches, etc.), so they aren't the place to look for how kingdoms can become part of a campaign. Kingdoms arise during other parts of the game. They emerge from the ideas and improvisation that everyone (players and GM) contribute to the game. There are ...


9

Its very reasonable to assume that D&D guards would be no more effective than modern officers. This assumption allows us to establish a baseline answer based off modern law-enforcement numbers. Looking here, it seems that at minimum, there's 15.9 Officers per 10k citizens. That's 477 modern Officers to police your example city. To estimate if a ...


9

Yes Certainly at high levels this is trivial. A 17th level wizard has access to the spell Time Stop, which lets him stop time, and Plane Shift, which lets him travel to the Astral Plane so as to better stop time. Such a wizard may investigate and/or fight crime wheresoever he chooses for as long as he wishes-- he is limited only by his patience. If he ...


8

Interesting question. I can't come up with a really good solution, but here is an unorthodox idea on how to tackle this: How about using a strategy computer game to model the progress of the city? This does provide some level of abstraction (a rather strong abstraction with some games), but it would give you: resource requirements time requirements ...


8

OK, first things first... throw out the Kingmaker rules. No seriously, look at the "Ultimate Campaign" books for something a little more sane. The rules in the original book are garbage and simply don't work. The Magic resources are dramatically over-powered the Forest hexes carry negative value even though the DM's guide identify the wood as being very ...


7

The rules here are perhaps not the best written, but the intent seems to be clear, so I'm going to try to help out. First, though, I suggest reading this other similar question; I'm not certain they're duplicates, but they're certainly related. Still got questions? Alright then, let's go. The GM still exists. These rules very specifically say that the ...


7

He holds the highest ranking job of the feudal system, which means it is his responsibility to protect his entire kingdom - he answers to no one, but should he fail to protect his land, he could face anything from a revolution to complete obliteration by another king. Which means, the two biggest things that preoccupy a King's time are: His People Other ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible