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7

Mythic Odysseys of Theros doesn't include a way to apply its Piety rules to another pantheon. However, The Dungeon Master's Guide (page 23) does include a section on altering the Renown system to allow for measuring Piety, which is less fleshed out than in Theros but functions similarly. Using this approach, you track renown based on specific divine ...


10

The Marut that Sanford provided is most likely what you are thinking of. The 3.5 version is, as you described, an enforcer against those that disrupt the natural order, specifically something called an Inevitable. Following the same link are other inevitable which target creatures that break contracts and elude justice. The 5e version is sort of a ...


24

You are most likely thinking of the Marut, a powerful construct/outsider (depends on the edition) that hunts those who cheat death, and has been in every edition since AD&D. What they are like for each edition: 1e AD&D - In 1e, They are the most powerful variety of inevitables, and although only a little information is given, it is mentioned how '...


7

While deities like Waukeen, Deneir, Gond, Siamorphe have tangentially close dogmas to your character's goals, I think there is a more obvious choice: Moradin. Dwarven history has many stories involving dwarves relentlessly carving out new domains and kingdoms, expanding their territories, shaping the "wild" ore into tools and weapons, and turning formless ...


7

There is no direct equivalent to Abadar in the Forgotten Realms setting. You had the right idea by looking up the Civilization Domain as a starting point, and you are right that none of the available gods represent "civilization for the sake of it". You may, however, push civilization as a way to honor many different gods. When we consider Abadar, other ...


4

Shaundakul, a lesser diety, seems to be the best fit. His portfolio includes: Exploration Travel Caravans Portals For dwarves, another diety whose portfolio includes Exploration would be Dumathoin.


2

Deliverance is described in the novel Shadowstorm by Paul S. Kemp. Quoting: The Risen Sun heresy had originated months ago and spread like wildfire among many of Lathander's clergy ... The heretics asserted that the Deliverance, an event in which the Morninglord would remake himself as the ancient sun god Amaunator, was imminent. The heretics ... presumed ...


6

The only form of address that appears consistently among the Sovereign Host priesthood is high priest The question says that Faiths of Eberron has been thoroughly scoured, but for the benefit of other readers, Faiths on Hierarchy, in part, says Beyond these general distinctions—councilor, general member, or priest with little involvement in the [local ...


1

D&D 5e relies a lot on older material from previous editions, particularly where cosmology is concerned. It makes explicit reference to the “multiverse,” and there are myriad suggestions that things are not supposed to be different (for most things) in 5e than they were before, but the details ultimately aren’t found in 5e and it will always be at least ...


2

This is a decent question, but I believe your approach is actually upside down. Even on a single planet (like real Earth), there are multiple belief systems, multiple pantheons, a huge variety of religious practices and faiths. So the correct question to ask is not why all the different settings don't have the same deities, but how come you can place the ...


-1

No answer is possible. There is no over-arching Dungeons and Dragons cosmology that can adequately answer your question. Each campaign setting is a distinct ontology with no relationship to any other. Any answer would necessarily be from the perspective of an individual setting. Some settings - like Spelljammer and Planescape - are designed to encapsulate ...


1

While I'm not aware of any Fifth Edition product that contains an explanation, this topic was covered in some depth in earlier editions of the game. Specifically, the Planescape and Spelljammer campaign settings released for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Second Edition both dealt extensively with multiple prime material plane worlds, and so needed to ...


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