New answers tagged

5

In my group, we call this "cinematic narration", and that's the term I will use here. When we have an issue in my group where a player is having trouble describing their actions cinematically, the first thing we do is ask them to describe how it would look in a movie. If I am understanding the problem, that is what you want the players to do. My first ...


2

Consider using the Stunt rules from Exalted Exalted is a system that intends to, among other things, emulate the style of wuxia martial arts fiction. One of the ways they do this is by implementing Stunts: mechanical bonuses for adding extra description to a character's actions. They have three levels: Level 1 stunts simply require a non-boring description ...


12

"How can I change my approach to this "rule of cool" to be more inclusive of everyone?" I may not necessarily be speaking for your player, but I can speak from experience as a very good roleplayer who is very into immersive play, and also into creative play, that this is a style of creative play that I would not enjoy, and your whole question reads to me ...


3

Tie character spotlight moments to in-game events, not out-of-game ancillary information The existing answers are good and rightly point out that communicating with your players is the best (and perhaps only) way to really address the issue and make sure everyone is getting what they want and expect from the game. But an angle which I think could be ...


8

Is this a problem? Obviously, this is reason for concern. In some groups, it will be a problem. The only way to know for certain is to talk to them. But some groups will not see it as a problem and will not want much to change. But before you take drastic actions, stop and ask if this is really a problem in your actual group. If everyone is happy as it is, ...


13

Step 1: Communicate with the group I know, it's cliche here on SE. But it's really the best way to handle these things. Although you may feel they are disinterested, there could be various reasons for their behavior. Sometimes at a session I had a rough day at work, and it's just hard to focus on playing. I still enjoy it, but probably doesn't seem like it ...


2

Allocate responsibility for it to the DM, and consider embracing the metagame elements of the situation My answer came out with an odd structure. The first two sections are not quite frame challenges, but are information I consider relevant to the question. The direct answer, matching the header above, follows after. First thing's first: I recommend not ...


9

You were right about the secret messages, you just need a subtle method. You had it right. This requires DM cooperation and that is achieved by communicating with the DM privately. Passing notes works well for most things, but it does tip the others off that there is private communication going on. If you want to fool the others, you would communicate in a ...


14

Trust the people you play with Or, if you don't: ask yourself "Why am I spending my leisure time with people I don't trust?" People understand the difference between themselves and their characters. It is inevitable and desirable that the players know things that the characters don't (like when the pizza's coming). They then compartmentalize that knowledge ...


3

I would encourage you to talk to your DM about creating space for player skill to be separated from character skill. Ability scores and character skills are in place to help facilitate all of this. The approach I use as a DM is imagining what players say and do as the things their characters think they are saying and doing. So if the player of the 8 ...


-2

There are already some great answers here. Here's something I use when I build any sort of team, or group. Ask each person to tell you their Myers-Briggs (if they know it)(if they don't know it, have them go to this link for a free Myers-Briggs test. Basically the first letter tells you right away what someone tends to be as far as an extrovert/introvert. ...


5

One approach that worked at my table was to roll the dice first, then role play the outcome. So the Paladin player (who was less of a role-player / ham) would perhaps roll well, and say "I make a rousing speech, like Churchill / Buzz Lightear, about how we will fight on, never surrender nor give up." The less than charismatic fighter played by the ...


4

If you feel you're caught off guard when the DM asks you to deliver an inspirational, intimidating, or persuasive speech, one option is to prepare vocabulary and/or canned speeches prior to the game session. Write up short blurbs on note cards, filled with flowery language straight out of Tolkien or Shakespeare. You can leave out specific names of ...


7

Point 1: Talk to your group Largely, this is an issue that ought to be brought up with your GM and group, the other answers touch on this well. Point 2: Try to change your approach to the way you describe what your character does As a fellow introvert, I understand not feeling entirely comfortable with speaking in character. That said, there is ...


16

Talk with your group about passive and active role-play. Enforce dice checks and award bonuses (like D&D's Inspiration) for good role-play, not only for good acting. Role-playing isn't acting. Your friend is a good actor (active role-play) in a poorly-social character. His PC imagines in his head grand speeches and the sort, but his PC should roll his ...


40

I ran into this when playing Exalted My PC was the "Socialite" (Merchant-Prince), with maxed Charisma and plenty of Social Skills. I am not that Social, and wished to play a Charismatic PC. Another PC was a Warrior, with minimal Social Skills (not a complete klutz, but just not in my league, numbers-wise). The player is well-known as a good Talker. I ...


Top 50 recent answers are included