37

It depends on your players and campaign style The problem, as you've noted, is that players start being able to do specific things really well. However, that's also the solution - force them to do new things. If your campaign is a dungeon crawl, this will be harder than if it's a city-based setting, but you have to remember that the PCs' actions shouldn't ...


35

I have introduced a good number of people to rpgs over the years, and I recently played Roll for Shoes with inexperienced players (with only a couple of sessions Dungeon Squad and a couple more of D&D 5e under their belts), so I think I have the combined experience to give an answer to this. Start in the players' world One great thing about Roll for ...


22

Roll for Shoes doesn't really have a "combat system" as such — unless you houserule one in, of course. Rather, combat in RfS is basically handled using the same general mechanics as everything else: the player rolls Nd6, where N is the level of the skill they're using, and tries to beat the GM's roll. The thing to keep in mind is that RfS is a ...


22

If they have Safecracking 5 and there aren't any safes around, then that 5 doesn't matter; they're going to be falling back on their broader, lower-dice skills. They may get new skills out of that, but they'll be something different again. In order for them to actually progress beyond the point where they have made Skullduggery 2 obsolete, they'd have to ...


21

I recently did exactly what you're talking about, and RFS was awesome for the job: its open structure let me model many different play strategies and styles quickly and easily just by applying different philosophies to different actions and scenes. First, the big pitfall I encountered: Roll For Shoes doesn't do much heavy lifting. The burden to make the ...


19

There's no specific rule or best way. Roll for Shoes is malleable, and you'll work out what works for you. I have a couple of preferred approaches I've used, which work very well for setting up the number of dice to use for the difficulty of the task. The first approach is complex, the second is less so, and they can be used together. There is not anything ...


17

As many as you think is reasonable. The rules for Roll for Shoes don't specify how many dice the GM should roll, so it's left up to their discretion. Obviously, you can come up with any kind of more or less elaborate schemes for determining an appropriate number, but at least in the games I've run, the following simple scheme has worked quite well: For ...


17

That is my understanding, yes. As I see it, spending multiple XP for advancement is the primary method of acquiring higher-level skills at all. It's the way I've played it, and it certainly makes the skills advance more quickly--which makes the game more interesting, because skill acquisition is one of the primary methods of establishing setting details ...


16

Yes, that would work fine. In fact, it would probably be the best course of action to permit that whole-heartedly. I've run several games of Roll for Shoes, for friends and even in the RPG Chat here. It's a very loose and fun game that has no qualms for balance, and has a tendency to let you have your cake and eat it too. It also has a tendency to careen ...


15

After asking this question I looked at the math and playtested a couple of different modifications. I have found that increasing the amount of xp required to buy a skill is a very effective way to reduce the rate of skill acquisition. Rather than the default cost of 1 xp to change a die to a six for advancement, I adjusted the cost to 10 xp. So far this ...


12

The way RfS skills work, the skill IS the circumstance modifier. You already get to roll an extra circumstance die because you're a chef and another one because you have a battle-spoon. Your opponent rolls an extra die for being knight-y and another one for being knight-y and having armor. If either side wins spectacularly, clearly they should get ...


12

Reading through the comment thread under the basic info, I ran into an approach suggested by a user and then tried by the guy who made the system. If you start reading from here, you'll see a lot of good stuff from them. The basic idea is that the world grows along with the player. The GM starts by writing down a Do Anything 1 for each of his important NPCs ...


11

I ran my first ever game as a Game Master in any system in Roll for Shoes just a couple of days ago, and despite my complete lack of experience running campaigns of any type, it went really well. What I found is that Roll for Shoes allows the GM to focus on the things that universally matter to the concept of tabletop role playing games, rather than ...


11

The comments on the original post have some interesting and useful commentary and ideas. Damage is one the issues addressed by the creator. For damage, we had this cartoony thing where you get busted up and humiliated in one scene, and then we don't really talk about the damage afterwards - unless you want to! Being badly beaten has effects in the fiction,...


7

Like Dragonsdoom, I found increasing the xp needed to level up helped. But instead of just a flat increase, I changed it to cost 1xp per point increase on the dice. Players would wait until they got close to all sixes before spending the xp since upgrading a die from 1 to six costs (1+2+3+4+5) 15 points but upgrading a 5 to a 6 only costs 5xp. The cost ...


7

Don't think, roll! Roll for shoes deliberately has as few rules as possible; things like doors, walls and so on don't have any stats particularly, they a number of a dice to resist it. If you think something should have a bonus then make it harder, the convention is for the resisting side to have more dice. For an NPC If the sum of your roll is higher ...


6

I spoke with the creator of the module on facebook; he said he'd set it to about 3 or 4, because the module is meant to be survivable easily for new players. Err on the side of 4, and there are optional bandages available later in the module that can restore a wound or two.


6

When players' characters actively oppose each other they're both just making regular skill rolls that we handle as normal: Say what you do and roll a number of d6s. In this case the thing Alice is trying to do is something that opposes the thing Bob's trying to do. This could include trying to find something out: Bob's rolling for "Bob is a bear" ...


6

To answer your question, yes it should be possible to make a system that is stable that allows for movement and health. You are going to need to decide how you are going do the mechanics and then either spend some time playing with the numbers to check they are stable enough, or pick some numbers and then adjust them to what suits as you play with your group....


5

Roll for Shoes doesn't have a concept of "DC" or "passive opposition" unless you invent one. The rules only supply the active variety of opposition: rolling dice! When a player wants to attempt something and the GM wants to oppose, the GM also rolls. If the player beats the GM's roll, what they want to happen happens. How many dice does the GM roll when ...


5

In my experience, yes. At least, I think it can work great for new GMs — I used it for the first game I ever GMed, and had a lot of fun doing so, and at least one of my players has gone on to do the same. The thing about RfS, from a GM's perspective, is that it's a microsystem — it really doesn't do much for you, except act as a randomness ...


3

I've been experimenting with a shonen (Dragon Ball Z, Naruto, One Piece, etc.) version of roll for shoes, and I've been going with a stun system based on how much someone loses a 'defense' roll. 1-6: Down for one exchange 7-12: Down for two exchanges 13+: Ko'ed until end of fight, dead if appropriate/player wants it. This version assumes that time works as ...


2

Is it balanced? Well, it's not horribly unbalanced, which is really the best that can be said for Roll for Shoes. RfS is not really a system that strives for perfect balance in the first place. In any case, your social reputation rules are the same for all players, so in that narrow sense they're by definition fair and balanced. It's not like your system ...


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