117

Definitions We all have our limits and boundaries. Lines and veils are different ways to handle those boundaries in play. A line is, well, a line — a hard limit, something we do not want to cross. Lines represent places we don't want to go in roleplaying. "There is no torture in the events in our game. We don't do it, NPCs don't do it to us or to each ...


31

X Card and other toolkit resources come with rules, whereas when groups which I've played with in the past left things to "plain communication" what happened when game content triggered people was that the conversation at times completely failed to improve safety and at times made the situation worse. Just to cite the rule, according to John Stavropoulos's ...


28

In my experience, the X-Card provides more benefit in the explanation than in the use of the card. It is incredibly powerful to start a session with an explicit reminder that everyone at the table is supposed to be sensitive to the needs of everyone else, that everyone is equally valuable and that everyone's individual foibles and lines will be respected. ...


18

While I'm not such a purist that I would avoid breaking character in a LARP to note that I want something to stop, I've met some people who play at that level in the Madrid scene. This is a method they frequently bring up when asked about the topic. Safewords. Safewords are a way of noting there's something you don't like in roleplay without directly ...


15

There has been a lot of talk in role playing communities over the past few years about lines and veils. Coined by Ron Edwards in his game Sex and Sorcery, lines and veils are our personal and group boundaries when role playing - what we are and aren’t comfortable in sharing and exploring with those around us in a role playing setting. – "What should ...


11

Consent forms have issues because they can never be specific enough, but may still be useful for some people. It is worth having a discussion, especially in horror, about what players may be comfortable or uncomfortable with. I know some people that think consent forms and related tools can help with that discussion. I personally do not use them as a GM, ...


9

Disclaimer My experience comes from LARPing in Russian Federation only, almost exclusively in Moscow. I have never LARPed in another country, and my experience outside of Moscow is very limited. LARP doesn't change much about touching Usually, unless the rules clearly permit this, just as in any other situation, you should probably refrain from touching ...


4

Depending on what you mean by "form", they can help or hinder. In all the games I run, I ask the players for a list of things they want, would like, would not like, and do not want in the game. The understanding is that anything not specifically in the "do not want" list might be included. In a horror game, that can include anything whatsoever however ...


3

I myself am a heavy advocate of the TTRPG Safety Toolkit and it's been helpful for me across a multitude of campaigns as both a DM and a Player. You mentioned that you have a very short time for any sort of "Session 0" or experience with the players, the best thing to do is give each player a small piece of card or paper and ask them to write down any "no-...


3

In addition to what has already been presented; The X Card and similar mechanics also present players with a method to express discomfort with actions and content within a game without needing to be confrontational towards the rest of the group or to give undue attention to the player invoking it: It's much more covert and potentially less emotionally ...


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