Hot answers tagged

105

Ask your DM whether it's supposed to be viable to decipher it, or whether you were supposed to find the clues in game. Given that they used a genuine (even if simple) cipher and a proper script hiding an actual message, it seems likely that they meant for cracking it in real life to be an option. But it might just be that they never expected anyone to ...


101

There is no automatic success for ability checks Rolling a natural 20 only guarantees success when attempting an attack in 5e. For skill checks, a natural 20 essentially means the pinnacle of what you are capable of doing naturally. So if the DC of a lock is 25, and your modifier on the roll is only +3, the lock is impossible for you to open without some ...


97

Cast Off Your Double Standards, and Accept That People Are Different The Double Standard But how about not physical talents? Any good GM would ask the player to be more specific about how he is actually planning to do this and if he can provide a reasonable plan of action, he would allow him to roll on his mechanical skills. I sense a double ...


50

Two options, but first, something to understand... Acquiring Stealth in combat means your opponent lost track of where you are right now, it does not mean that your previous location was erased from their mind. Nor does Stealth make you invisible. Physically Go Looking For Them Remember that Stealth stops working if it makes sense that it stopped working. ...


43

2. The Alert feat negates surprise Because the Alert feat (PHB, p. 165) states: You can't be surprised while you are conscious A character with the Alert feat cannot be surprised while they are conscious. "Surprised" has a clear mechanical meaning. If a character is surprised, they cannot act on their first turn of combat, and after their first turn, ...


39

There are several options, some more devastating than others. I'll list my three favorite ones here: Chase the Rogue As Guildsbounty mentioned, a hidden Rogue isn't invisible: it just means their enemies have lost track of where they are. But their enemies still know where they were. You can run behind the last object you saw the Rogue go behind. Unless ...


37

The omission of passive perception is a mistake - nothing else is wrong here. The Wizard gets proficiency in Perception from being an elf. All elves get the following: Keen Senses. You have proficiency in the Perception skill. SRD p. 4 All characters should have a Passive Perception, whether it's good or bad, so the fact that it's ...


35

Persuasion to Convince a Crowd The core rules include cases of groups in their examples of persuasion checks: Examples of persuading others include convincing a chamberlain to let your party see the king, negotiating peace between warring tribes, or inspiring a crowd of townsfolk. Performance is about Entertainment Performance: Your Charisma (...


34

Yup, you always get your ability score bonus. Despite common misconceptions, D&D5E doesn't actually have "skill checks". It has ability checks, that sometimes get a proficiency bonus, too. For example, a Dexterity check might reflect a character's attempt to pull off an acrobatic stunt, to palm an object, or to stay hidden. Each of these aspects of ...


32

Speaking honestly is different from stating an absolute truth. Your player has made a very keen observation about one of Pathfinder's flaws. If you tell a convincing lie, then the listener's understanding of reality is suddenly changed, regardless of their prior knowledge? The way the Bluff skill is written, it would certainly imply a degree of the ...


32

Your interpretation is correct You already quote all the necessary rules. Using Thieves' Tools usually involves an ability check Proficiency in Thieves' Tools lets you add your proficiency bonus to the check Reliable Talent works on any check where you add proficiency Therefore, Reliable Talent will work on a check that uses Thieves' Tools if you are ...


30

A natural 20 has no special meaning on a Perception check. Natural 20s mean nothing special on ability checks (whether or not they are associated with a skill), as already established by your previous question. And Perception is indeed a skill: The skills related to each ability score are shown in the following list. (No skills are related to ...


29

Allowing your player to take Perception here would probably be against Rules as Intended RAW your player can choose proficiency in two from five options as a Cleric: History, Insight, Medicine, Persuasion, and Religion And as a Knowledge domain cleric also gains proficiency in two of the following four skills: Arcana, History, Nature, or Religion Ruling ...


29

No, Resilient grants proficiency in Saving Throws only The PHB (pp 168) says the Resilient feat gives you (my emphasis): ...proficiency in saving throws using the chosen ability. Skills and ability checks are separate mechanics that require proficiency of their own from a source (background, race, class etc.) Related Skills could be improved, but you'...


29

The D&D Beyond site is adding a +5 to your passive Perception due to your Sentinel Shield giving you advantage. From the SRD/basic rules on passive checks: A passive check is a special kind of ability check that doesn’t involve any die rolls. Such a check can represent the average result for a task done repeatedly, such as searching for secret doors ...


29

No Consider this text from the Major Image spell: Physical interaction with the image reveals it to be an illusion, because things can pass through it. A creature that uses its action to examine the image can determine that it is an illusion with a successful Intelligence (Investigation) check against your spell save DC. If a creature discerns the ...


28

In gaming, nothing is "wrong" if the group agrees on it. Having said that, I would venture to say this approach is somewhat against custom and wouldn't be received well in the average table. If I had a player show up who just started to declare "I roll X", I'd respond, regardless of the result, "You fail. I call for rolls at this table." There are many ...


28

Aboleths do have [something which is mechanically equivalent to] Expertise in those skills The Monster Manual uses the word 'expertise' when describing how certain creatures might have higher-than-expected bonuses to certain skills: The Skills entry is reserved for monsters that are proficient in one or more skills. For example, a monster that is very ...


26

The PC needs modifiers to raise that 20 to 25 or higher If you are trying to, for example, lockpick a very high-difficulty lock that requires a DC 25 and you get natural 20, do you lockpick it as it is "Natural Success" or do you have to have a +5 or higher modifier with thieve's tools as well? The core rules put Proficiency into play, as well as ...


25

You choose it. As you said yourself, the list that presents your options has more elements than the number they tell you to choose. Rogue has 11 options available and you choose 4 from it. The only thing you can't choose are the skills from the background and some racial skill proficiencies - but you can make a custom background that fits what you want, ...


25

Posing as someone else typically uses Deception checks. In the situation you describe, the PC is posing as a bodyguard and doesn't want to be exposed. Whether this means maintaining a disguise, or hiding her motives, or keeping up a convincing guard persona, the Charisma (Deception) skill is probably most appropriate. Deception. Your Charisma (Deception) ...


24

The Player's Handbook has a section for "Passive Checks" for all ability scores These rules are found on page 175, entitled "Passive Checks": Passive Checks A passive check is a special kind of ability check that doesn't involve any die rolls. Such a check can represent the average result for a task done repeatedly, such as searching for secret ...


24

No, not all passive ability checks are floors for active ability checks Passive perception is a special case because it is generally assumed that you are always perceiving the world around you - so it makes sense that you always get the benefit of passive perception. For most skills, though, their use is not a background constant - if you try to jump a gap, ...


23

Players can't "check" with their passive Wisdom (Perception) score The passive Wisdom (Perception) check only comes into effect when the DM chooses, with the two cases laid out in the rules being repeated tests or when the DM wishes to conceal information. A passive check is a special kind of ability check that doesn't involve any die rolls. Such a ...


22

No The rule on proficiency bonuses states: If a circumstance suggests that your proficiency bonus applies more than once to the same roll, you still add it only once and multiply or divide it only once. So no matter how many features you have that double your proficiency bonus, you only get to multiply it once.


22

The total is all that matters. Source: Savage Worlds Deluxe, pp. 62-63. In general, it's a bad idea to assume that all D&D rules have analogies in other game systems, especially when they use quite different dice mechanics.


21

The rules on the Intimidation skill state: Intimidation. When you attempt to influence someone through overt threats, hostile actions, and physical violence, the GM might ask you to make a Charisma (Intimidation) check. Examples include trying to pry information out of a prisoner, convincing street thugs to back down from a confrontation, or using the ...


21

The DMG says: Some DMs prefer to run a social interaction as a free-form roleplaying exercise, where dice rarely come into play. Other DMs prefer to resolve the outcome of an interaction by having characters make Charisma checks. Either approach works, and most games fall somewhere in between, balancing player skill (roleplaying and persuading) ...


19

Use intelligence checks, in particular, the Arcana, History, Investigation, Nature, and Religion skills. From the Ability Scores and Modifiers section of the basic rules, under Intelligence: An Intelligence check comes into play when you need to draw on logic, education, memory, or deductive reasoning. The Arcana, History, Investigation, Nature, and ...


19

There is much more to a performance than the actual performance itself. It takes many hours of practice to perfect an art (trust me), not to mention the time it takes to compose or find new music or stories, especially in a world without wide-spread printing or downloads! And then there is marketing yourself, gaining reputation, finding places that have ...


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