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0

It depends how you steal the item The description of Stealth states: Make a Dexterity (Stealth) check when you attempt to conceal yourself from enemies, slink past guards, slip away without being noticed, or sneak up on someone without being seen or heard. The description of Sleight of Hand states: Whenever you attempt an act of legerdemain or manual ...


2

No, there are no bonus or penalty dice associated with skill improvement rolls. Think about what it would mean to add a bonus die to a improvement roll. It would actually make it less likely that the given skill would improve. Likewise a "penalty" die would actually make an increase more likely. Therefore, it doesn't make sense to apply the bonus/penalty ...


12

You're really asking two very distinct questions, so we'll tackle them one at a time. We'll start with Do Multi skill checks exist? Yes, and in multiple combinations. Sometimes the skill work in sequence; you need to successfully perform one check in order for the opportunity to perform the second. For instance a caber toss. You would first do an ...


12

It would be the Performance skill since you are trying to perform for a crowd. Deception wouldn't really be applicable since you aren't really trying to convince someone of something that isn't true using words. ie. You are deceiving people, but not by using speaking lies to them. Sleight of hand doesn't cover it since you aren't using your hands to make ...


1

In a first instance divine shifts are defined however the players and GM negotiate. The reason for this is to allow a high level of customisation to the godly powers the players wield. I gave a lightning god a divine shift that conferred a lightning damage bonus to all attacks made using a dagger throwing ability they had following the rules for a Single ...


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I have been learning 5e rules and found this question as I also noticed the discrepancy on the Fighter character sheet in the Starter Set. I also noticed that none of the answers provided to you actually answer the question. The answer is that the sheets are correct. To understand why, look at the description of skills on pages 174-175 of the PHB: [...] ...


3

No While adjacency isn't defined, other text shows that you are not considered adjacent to yourself. Specifically, looking at the related Battle Medicine skill feat (p258) You can patch up yourself or an adjacent ally, even in combat...' You can see the methodology is that "you" and "an adjacent ally" are two different valid targets for the Battle ...


-1

No. You must perform it on an adjacent creature as per the quoted ability text. You are not considered to be adjacent to yourself.


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Not with their Wisdom(Medicine) check! Medicine is pretty much a useless proficiency to take. It typically applies only to stabilizing creatures and diagnosing illnesses, the first of which requires only ever a DC 10 Wisdom check and is specifically called out in the rules as a bad option as compared to magical healing and the second of which is the sort ...


20

It depends This is up to the DM and how they have decided to implement how players go about with their investigation checks. Some checks have no chance of triggering a trap and hence don't apply to this situation, but there are a few situations where that might not be the case. For example, if you were to check all the tiles on the floor of a room for a ...


16

Traps are typically not set off via failed Investigation checks As iaminsensible's answer points out, typically failed Investigation checks to find traps in areas with traps simply result in no traps being found, as though you had rolled to Investigate an area that really didn't have any traps. However, there has been a precedent set for failed attempts to ...


3

They don't find the traps Investigation check means usually scanning the area for traps so if someone were to not succeed it means that they found no traps. But ultimately it is up to the DM.


5

This is not covered by the rules intentionally Your question is very logical, and I guess it naturally comes from the following points: The game rules define the game world According to these rules, a creature can take the Hide action After taking the Hide action, a creature can be or not be hidden But does the creature know the outcome of its Hide action?...


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