New answers tagged

1

If the diamond dust used to be one single diamond, then with a generous interpretation of the rules, it might be possible to use the Mending spell to turn it back into a complete diamond. This spell repairs damaged objects, restoring 1d4 hit points to the object. If the object has the broken condition, this condition is removed if the object is restored to ...


-3

It has a value of 100gp. Don't give it too much thought. Although it is true that converting a precious diamond into powder would diminish its total value, D&D/Pathfinder does not model luxury item pricing in such detail.


2

As other answerers have said in more detail, mending only repairs a single break/tear in the target object, making repairing the sapphire by that means questionable. That said, I wanted to comment on the following: [...], or would the price be less because it lost the ability to be used as a component in Drawmij's Instant summons? I actually don't think it ...


5

It is up to the DM. There is no uniform answer to what exactly happens with the material and thus it is up to DM-Fiat. We know that: If a spell states that a material component is consumed by the spell, the caster must provide this component for each casting of the spell. We have to look at each spell description individually for example let us look at ...


3

Looking at the 1st-level conjuration spell "Find Familiar" (Player's Handbook 240), it specifies the material component as "10 gp worth of charcoal, incense, and herbs that must be consumed by fire in a brass brazier." The application of the word "consumed" here indicates that the items are destroyed by the natural action of ...


18

Gone, used up, emptied, valueless. Within the game context, the only description of 'consumed' is that it means you need a new component for each casting, so that is unhelpful in determining what consumption means between the options you've provided. When the game does not describe a specific game-meaning for a word, we use the ordinary English meaning of it....


29

It probably disappears. The rules for material components state: If a spell states that a material component is consumed by the spell, the caster must provide this component for each casting of the spell. So we know that when a spell consumes a material component, that component is no longer available to be used next time you cast the spell. The idea with ...


24

The question seems to boil down to the ability to mend a crushed gem. The Instant Summons spell is not relevant to what you're ultimately asking. Mending states: "... repairs a single break or tear in an object ..." The examples are equally clear and simple. Crushing is not a single break or tear in an object. If you went with an interpretation ...


2

There are no mechanics for mending crushed gems, so it’s completely up to the DM. There are just no mechanics for mending crushed gems. There is nothing to tell us if the damage is compatible with the mending spell either. Is it “crushed” into two pieces or a gazillion pieces? So the DM decides if it can be done, and if so, how it can be done, be it with ...


4

Yes, if you're a Githzerai or Artificer. The Githzerai race has the Githzerai Psionics ability, which let's you cast the Shield spell without needing components once per day, once you hit level 3. This would allow you to freely cast the spell while weilding a sword and shield. Similarly, an Artificer treats all their spells as though they had Material ...


-1

I'm a little slow on the draw here, but I can't see any reference to feats; my solution to this would be to take the Metamagic Adept feat or 3 levels in Sorcerer (or both), enabling myself to take the subtle spell Metamagic feature and preclude the necessity for any verbal components. The feat is described RAW as such: When you Cast a Spell, you can spend 1 ...


20

It's just a contradiction, requiring the DM to make a ruling. There is no explaining this one away. Wish ignores the material component of magic jar, and the spell description of magic jar utilizes that material component as part of the effect of magic jar. It's just a contradiction. The DM will have to make ruling. As it says in the introduction to Xanathar'...


2

Yes, but this doesn't remove the need to speak the words. Sure, you can cast a spell using the Word of the Spirit ability to make the Verbal components of their spell only audible to themselves (or to one other creature within 60 feet of themselves). However, you're still required to speak the words of the Verbal component - your mouth still moves. ...


1

Maybe? I'll quote the relevant two bits of rules: Word of the Spirit. When you speak, you can direct your words to a creature of your choice that you can see within 60 feet of you, making it so only that creature can hear you. Alternatively, you can amplify your voice so that all creatures within 600 feet can hear you. What we can infer from that is that ...


10

No. The Archdruid feature does not allow you to ignore material components that are consumed. Archdruid states: Additionally, you can ignore the verbal and somatic components of your druid spells, as well as any material components that lack a cost and aren’t consumed by a spell. Use of the word “and” indicates you can ignore a material component only if ...


3

Any fur or feather from any beast. Compare to the spell creation. The material component for enhance ability is: fur or a feather from a beast No further specificity is given, so no further specificity is needed. Any fur or feather from a beast will work for any of the spell's options. For the spell's particular options to require a particular material ...


1

Spell scrolls require no components The rules for activating a spell from an item are: The spell ... requires no components, unless the item's description says otherwise. So, the general rule is that an item cast from a magic item requires no components UNO. The rules for spell scrolls are: ... you can read the scroll and cast its spell without providing ...


Top 50 recent answers are included