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20

No, a wizard can only copy spells of levels they can actually prepare. Unfortunately, as the rules describing the wizard's spellcasting and spellbook state: Copying a Spell into the Book. When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if it is of a spell level you can prepare and if you can spare the time to ...


-1

RAW spells do not have to be cast every day while creating a construct In Creating Magic Items it is specifically statet that spells have to be cast every day. Here is an example for armors: The act of working on the armor triggers the prepared spells, making them unavailable for casting during each day of the armor’s creation. Nothing of the kind is ...


7

Nothing prevents your familiar from concentrating on a spell or using a magic item The section on "Concentration" states the following: Some spells require you to maintain concentration in order to keep their magic active. If you lose concentration, such a spell ends. If a spell must be maintained with concentration, that fact appears in its ...


14

This is answered, if not very directly, in the Sage Advice Compendium (version 2.3, if it matters). Do you always know when you’re under the effect of a spell? [...] Some spells are so subtle that you might not know you were ever under their effects. A prime example of that sort of spell is suggestion. Assuming you failed to notice the ...


5

Here are four options: Wait for them to spend their reaction first, or cause it to be spent on something or someone else before casting. Use the reach metamagic. If you have a familiar, use Spell Delivery to deliver the spell. Some conditions can prevent your being targeted by the ability, such as giving the Fighter the unconscious condition, or you having ...


2

The latter Spellcasters call their "class DC" "spell DC"; those two are equivalent in any way that I have seen. I have not found any class abilities for spellcasters that call for a "class DC", so indeed, I think you have misunderstood class DC slightly.


5

Yes. If we look at Use Magic Device we see: Use a Wand, Staff, or Other Spell Trigger Item: Normally, to use a wand, you must have the wand’s spell on your class spell list. This use of the skill allows you to use a wand as if you had a particular spell on your class spell list. Failing the roll does not expend a charge. So in order to use a wand ...


4

As written, yes. Cunning Caster applies the penalty if the spell requires a focus, regardless of whether or not you have to do anything with it. You can ask your DM for an exception in such cases—not totally implausible—but it’s not part of the official feat.


10

Cast a Spell does not inherently trigger Attacks of Opportunity. Cast a Spell, on its own, is not a Manipulate action (it does not have the manipulate trait), it is not inherently a ranged attack, it is not a move action (it does not have the move trait), therefore it does not provoke attacks of opportunity on its own. But Components can change that ...


5

Cast a Spell can sometimes trigger an Attack of Opportunity The Cast a Spell action can sometimes have the manipulate trait, depending on the components needed to cast the spell: The spell components, described in detail below, add traits and requirements to the Cast a Spell activity. If you can’t provide the components, you fail to Cast the Spell. ...


5

The first interpretation is correct Taking this a line at a time You can cast each of these spells once without expending a spell slot. Each is the key word here, and clearly refers to every spell being different Once you cast a spell in this way, you can't do so again until you finish a long rest. A is the key word in this line, and the object ...


4

As clarified in errata: each spell can be cast once per long rest. Volo's Guide to Monsters received an errata in August 2017 that addresses the ambiguity you point out. Post-errata, the triton's Control Air and Water trait (VGtM, p. 118) now reads: A child of the sea, you can call on the magic of elemental air and water. You can cast fog cloud with ...


7

You can cast each of the spells in the list once. As you said in option one in your question, the text reads "You can cast each of these spells once..."; implying that you can cast each of the individual spells listed in the table above it once (refreshing after a long rest).


1

'I was wondering, if a wizard on round 1 cast a spell requiring 2 actions and ends its turn with preparing a silent spell, is he able to use the benefits of this feat at round 2?' Ask your GM 'You must use a metamagic action directly before Casting the Spell you want to alter. If you use any action (including free actions and reactions) other than Cast ...


1

There are 2 things here. I think going outside of range shouldn't break concentration, shouldn't end the spell, BUT if the effect requires an action/bonus action to activate it then it should require sight (and/or range). I don't think Player's Handbook p.203 is enough here. Once a spell is cast, its effects aren’t limited by its range, unless the spell’...


3

No The description of metamagic says (link goes to Archives of Nethys, which cites the Core Rulebook page 634): You must use a metamagic action directly before Casting the Spell you want to alter. If you use any action (including free actions and reactions) other than Cast a Spell directly after, you waste the benefits of the metamagic action. If you ...


11

1 each per day; looks like reskin of Warlock feature Mystic Arcanum In my copy of Volo's, I read this under Warlock of the Fiend: 1/day each: feeblemind, finger of death, plane shift ( pg. 219) Translation: each day cast one feeblemind, one finger of death, and one plane shift. Given the level of those spells, seeing it as a reskin of Mystic Arcanum ...


9

It appears that whatever source you're using to find this creature's statblock has elided some important details, as in my reference, the statblock is quite explicit that these spells are being provided once per day each. [...] 1/day each: feeblemind, finger of death, plane shift [...] —Warlock of the Fiend, Volo's Guide to Monsters, pg. 219 So ...


12

Spellcasters and “levels” The word “level” is notoriously overused in D&D, and therefore also in Pathfinder. Characters have many, many different “levels” relevant to them, and yet in almost all cases things use the word “level” without any clarification. Character level is your overall level, which is also equal to the number of “hit dice” you have, ...


6

Your caster level is the sum of your levels in that caster class, plus your levels in all prestige classes that count as that class, plus eventually any other bonuses that apply specifically and explicitly to caster level. Caster Level A spell’s power often depends on its caster level, which for most spellcasting characters is equal to her class ...


1

Explicit mentions of how magic items are affected on the planes are very rare in the Manual of Planes and they are very specific to individual planes, with no general arguments laid out. So this issue appears to be in the purview of individual DMs. Those who are familiar with 2e Planescape rules would tend to apply the rules of magic to magical effects from ...


13

Monsters can upcast spells just as characters can The Monster Manual's section on "Spellcasting" states (page 10; emphasis mine): A monster with the Spellcasting class feature has a spellcaster level and spell slots, which it uses to cast its spells of 1st level and higher (as explained in the Player's Handbook). The spellcaster level is also used for ...


-1

What your player is asking for is a fraction of the Spell Mastery class feature that a wizard would gain at level 18. In short, giving the player what he ask would unbalance the game a lot. The spell wish can do anything the DM says it does. You will have to decide what a wish can do. With that said, you should warn your players on how you will resolve a ...


2

Usually, but there's often no penalty to failure So, using a wand is casting a spell: Wands use the spell trigger activation method, so casting a spell from a wand is usually a standard action that doesn't provoke attacks of opportunity (emphasis added) But it is also activating a magic item. The above quote is pretty much the only time activating a ...


-1

Unless you are running a game where PCs are like gods incarnate, you don't want the Wish to fully give him what he intends. Also, you don't want the wishes to be a complete waste. Wishes going sour can be fun when it creates interesting narrative and new plot for the players to engage in, but it can also be a lazy answer. (The "bloke named Will" approach, ...


-1

As everyone has said, way, way too powerful. Expect it to backfire badly. Another option for a backfire: He can cast at will--as in nothing needs to be done. Everything he casts is stilled/silent and doesn't require components. I'd be generous and only raise the required slot by one, though.


-1

Jerk Genie Answer As a single action, the wizard can now use every spell (spell slot) they've prepared for the day targeting the same individual. Beneficial, harmful, ineffective, doesn't matter, they can, At-Will, cast all their spells. They'll need a long rest afterwards, and the results might be chaotic depending on what spells were simultaneously cast. ...


2

As already said, this is too powerful to allow it to happen. It would render all of your other players worthless, and after awhile the novelty of the power wore off even the wizard would likely stop having fun in a world that doesn't challenge him. this spell can not be granted as is. The spell description clearly states that the more powerful a wish the ...


-1

Yes, but they cast unconsciously in dreams and other non-intentional states This is not actual advice on how to run a game. In a story, however, an appropriate outcome to someone being able to perform miracles without foresight is just that... every instinct they have leads to magical effects. Annoyed at the waitress? She's a toad, before your conscious ...


2

From the wish spell: The GM has great latitude in ruling what occurs in such an instance; the greater the wish, the greater the likelihood that something goes wrong. This spell might simply fail, the effect you desire might only be partly achieved, or you might suffer some unforeseen consequence as a result of how you worded the wish. Now, this is an ...


2

You should not let him waste the wish on that. It would be game-breakingly powerful as already explained in other answers. I would tell the player this up front, and give examples on how the wording could be twisted. Wording "the ability to cast all of his spells at will from now on", I'll summarize the answers seen so far and add my own potential ...


3

Circle spells require spell slots First lets start by looking at the rule for Circle Spells (emphasis mine): Your mystical connection to the land infuses you with the ability to cast certain spells. At 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th level you gain access to circle spells connected to the land where you became a druid. [...] Once you gain access to a circle ...


4

A spell gained from a Circle requires a spell slot to cast, but it counts as a Druid spell and is always prepared The Circle Spells feature is similar for each subclass of Druid and below I will quote the one from the Circle of the Land Druid Your mystical connection to the land infuses you with the ability to cast certain spells. At 3rd, 5th, 7th, and ...


6

Yes, Circle spells (of 1st level and higher) require spell slots. For druids (and other spellcasters who prepare spells), the benefit of extra spells is that they are always prepared, in addition to the number of spells they can prepare after a long rest. Once you gain access to a circle spell, you always have it prepared, and it doesn’t count against ...


22

Yes, but... Theoretically, the Wish spell can do anything the DM allows. Per the spell description, You might be able to achieve something beyond the scope of the above examples. State your wish to the DM as precisely as possible. The DM has great latitude in ruling what occurs in such an instance; the greater the wish, the greater the likelihood that ...


-1

Yes but it would be very powerful and is unlikely to work Allowing the player to cast any spell at will is immensely game breaking. It means that almost any challenge, the few exceptions being areas devoid of magic and things like Counterspell (though even Counterspell can be counterspelled as per the Sage Advice Compendium, and you’d likely cast it at 9th ...


14

DM's Word Is Law Ah, the wish spell... Let's put this simply. D&D is about telling a story. If a PC wants to do something incredibly broken (like give themselves unlimited spell casting potential) your story can fall apart. You end up with a super character that stands above and doesn't need other PCs. Wish is a powerful spell, but it shouldn't be able ...


0

An idea: You mean like he does already? He chooses to cast a spell, uses a spell slot and maybe a material component (depending on the spell). Apparently he already can cast at will. That would be funny. My perspective: I wouldn't give it to him like how I assume he wants it. To cast all his spells for free unlimited times per rest. What I would do is let ...


12

Be very careful how you deal with this I hate the Wish spell, and in my games it only works for what is in the description, what is written in other places such as the Deck of Many Things, a 'please help me in this specific situation' manner (akin to being immune to the lich as suggested in the spell), or a 'please indulge this awesome RP element' manner ...


3

Yes but no While technically this is within the scope of what Wish can do judging by the quoted text below, the key thing to not is that "the greater the wish, the greater the likelihood that something goes wrong." You might be able to achieve something beyond the scope of the above examples. State your wish to the DM as precisely as possible. The DM has ...


64

That would be very powerful. Let's compare the effect with the other things Wish can do: You grant up to ten creatures you can see immunity to a single spell or other magical effect for 8 hours You undo a single recent event by forcing a reroll of any roll made within the last round You grant up to ten creatures that you can see resistance to a damage type ...


37

Up to you Quoting from the rules of the Wish spell: You might be able to achieve something beyond the scope of the above examples. State your wish to the DM as precisely as possible. The DM has great latitude in ruling what occurs in such an instance, the greater the wish, the greater the likelihood that something goes wrong. However, "casting all my ...


13

Burning Hands learned from the Magic Initiate feat can be cast at its lowest level once a day without spending a spell slot. You learn that spell and can cast it at its lowest level. Once you cast it, you must finish a long rest before you can cast it again using this feat. Additionally, if you have spell slots from the class you chose for Magic ...


1

You can upcast the spell using the multiclassing rules The Magic Initiate feat states (emphasis mine): In addition, choose one 1st-level spell from that same list. You learn that spell and can cast it at its lowest level. Once you cast it, you must finish a long rest before you can cast it again using this feat. The benefit of learning this spell and ...


5

You cannot upcast the spell If you take the RAW ruling, you cannot upcast the level 1 spell you acquire from the Magic Initiate feat, in your case of cleric/sorcerer, since you don't have any sorcerer spell slots to upcast it with. The learned spell does not have a spell slot You can treat this spell you learn similar to how some races can cast spells ...


15

The Magic Initiate feat description reads, in part (emphasis mine): You learn that spell and can cast it at its lowest level. Once you cast it, you must finish a long rest before you can cast it again using this feat. There is typically no way to upcast a 1st-level spell that is gained via the Magic Initiate feat (see below for exception). A 1st-...


-1

The Spell Slot is used. To my Knowledge the spellcaster is attempting to cast a spell therefore the spell slot is used up in the attempt. Though the attempt is nullified due to Forbiddance Which doesn't allow the spell to work. Though this is ultimately up to the DM. If the DM wishes to be nice they can and say that the spell slot isn't used.


9

In short, yes, the spell slot is consumed. They cannot teleport into the Forbidden area, but things can still happen. What the rules say From the SRD: "Preparing and Casting Spells ... To cast one of these spells, you must expend a slot of the spell's level or higher." Casting the spell is one thing. The spell taking effect (or not) is a separate thing. ...


-1

The spell simply fails. The spell description for Forbiddance directly states that creatures cannot go into the area (as quoted by yourself) by teleportation of any means, until it is dispelled, or it's duration maximum is reached. The character still expends the spell slot, as they have prepared to as well as already casted Teleport, even if the spell ...


16

The spell slot is used There is no RAW statement about failure when casting spells except under spells that take a longer casting times: Certain spells (including spells cast as rituals) require more time to cast: minutes or even hours. When you cast a spell with a casting time longer than a single action or reaction, you must spend your action each turn ...


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