New answers tagged

1

One minor improvement - find familiar can be cast as a ritual, so you can save those spell slots if you're willing to add an extra 10 minutes to the hour-long casting time. There's not much you can do about the 10 gp material component cost though.


12

There is no way to 'heal' Bigby's hand All of the healing spells or temp HP granting is for creatures, and Bigby's Hand is not a creature. Anything else would be homebrew, and I'd probably recommend against doing so. My experience with Bigby's Hand is that it is a very powerful spell. Healing it would increase it's power level and I wouldn't recommend adding ...


4

Normally, familiars have around 1 or 2 HP... because the normal familiar options are not that good. The best way to defend your familiar is mentioned in the description of find familiar itself: As an action, you can temporarily dismiss your familiar. It disappears into a pocket dimension where it awaits your summons. Alternatively, you can dismiss it ...


11

Combat familiars are a class feature of Pact of the Chain Warlocks. The basic familiar normally available to users of the spell find familiar is not well suited to battle, as you have observed. There are things you can do, such as using shield of faith, but even then, the familiar is still so squishy, your spell slots are probably best used elsewhere. Useful ...


-4

The answer is that RAW cannot resolve this problem and you are sufficiently correct . You must use RAI and your best judgement. Don't forget the Iron Golem's Magic Resistance which would give it advantage on the saving throw when you use your method to resolve the conflict. The significance of Magic Resistance becomes clear from an examination of previous ...


3

Animate objects does not deal damage, animated objects do. The spell animate objects creates creatures out of objects that can themselves deal damage by making attacks. But the spell itself does not deal damage, so there is no damage type to replace via Awakened Spellbook.


0

Under one interpretation of the rules as written, no feature besides spellcasting from a non-warlock class can be fueled with warlock spell slots, and no warlock feature besides pact magic can be fueled by non-warlock spell slots. The multiclassing rules for spellcasting tell you to add up your spellcasting slot levels from multiple classes, except for ...


3

Giant's Might cannot override Enlarge if you no longer meet the condition for Giant's Might. Giant's Might states: If you are smaller than Large, you become Large If you use Giant's Might to become Large, then cast enlarge/reduce to become Huge, Giant's might does not force you back to Large because it says you become Large only if you are smaller than ...


2

Technically, order matters Other answer showcase this well enough but say enlarge/reduce was applied first, then you are already Large and becoming Large again (using Giant's Might) simply does nothing. Whereas, as already demonstrated in your question and its other answers, doing things the other way around means you would first become Large and then be ...


9

The order does count. As you reported, the description of Giant's Might says (emphasis mine): If you are smaller than Large, you become Large, along with anything you are wearing. If someone has already cast on you Enlarge/Reduce making you Large, if you try to use Giant's Might then the size requirement is not met, hence you remain simply Large. There is ...


20

Your Interpretation is Correct In D&D 5e specific beats general. That is: If a specific rule contradicts a general rule, the specific rule wins. In this case Damage Immunity: Fire is a general rule that applies to many creatures, allowing them to take no damage from fire. Fire Absorption is given in the monster's statblock and specifically describes ...


11

The intent is obvious. Your interpretation is obviously correct. Obviously the feature does something, so there is no need to entertain the idea that it does nothing. So naturally, we conclude that Fire Absorption works as described, being resolved prior to fire immunity. This answer is similar to another answer of mine, where I give more detailed exposition ...


10

You can have it look like a sword, but it still does Bludgeoning damage. According to Tasha's Cauldron of Everything on Personalizing Spells, it's allowable to change the aesthetics of a spell, as long as the mechanics (including damage types) remain the same, and the spell isn't being hidden as a different spell. For instance, one of the examples given is a ...


3

It depends on the build of your character and DM homebrew Shillelagh was specifically made for spellcasters where their spellcasting ability score means more, and before Tasha's came out, Rangers didn't get any cantrips. So already this combination is more powerful for Rangers. Potential unbalanced of a Magical Transforming weapon with a cantrip If your DM ...


15

Yep, it's useless The text of the Eldritch Invocation is pretty clear...you can cast bane using a Warlock Spell Slot. If you don't have Warlock Spell Slots, you cannot cast it. This same rule applies to a multi-classed Warlock: they have to use a Warlock spell slot for this, they can't use a normal spell slot that they acquired from, say, Multi-classing ...


8

You are correct, this Invocation is useless to someone without Warlock spell slots Features and abilities do what they say they do and nothing else. Since the invocation doesn't add Bane to your list of spells known nor does it grant you a spell slot, you have no means to cast it. It's also important to note that Warlock spell slots from the Pact Magic ...


7

Knock has no effect on magical locks unless indicated (or ruled) otherwise "Magical locks" can come in all shapes and sizes. You could find a mundane lock secured with an Arcane Lock spell; a magical portal that opens only when a specific key object is nearby; a blank stone wall in which a door appears when you speak the password; a bridge that ...


1

If you choose a target that is held shut with arcane lock, that spell is suppressed for 10 minutes, during which time the target can be opened and shut normally. As Arcane Lock is specifically mentioned it just works on things held shut by Arcane Lock. Arcane Lock is the only thing to do so tho. But of course a DM can use special magic locks that don't work ...


23

No, you can't improve Thirsting Blade with Vampiric Touch Thirsting Blade is a Warlock's counterpart of the Extra Attack feature: You can attack with your pact weapon twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn. Vampiric Touch is a spell involving a spell attack: The touch of your shadow-wreathed hand can siphon life force ...


6

No You've answered your own question: the spell description doesn't say that it is possible to request a specific demon for which the true name is known If it were possible, it would be specified in the spell. The spell, however, only specifies that: You choose the demon’s type... If you could summon a specific demon, this would be explained in the spell'...


12

Your ruling is almost correct. The rules concerning a clear path to the target state: To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover. If you place an area of effect at a point that you can't see and an obstruction, such as a wall, is between you and that point, the point of origin comes into being on the near side ...


2

I know this is pretty old, but I would like to add that as per the Monster Manual Dragons are also magical creatures whose innate power fuels their dreaded breath weapons and other preternatural abilities. Pag. 86, MM I would interpret it as this: dragons' "innate power" is granted by their status as magical creatures, the innate power fuels ...


7

The bolded text allows characters to move with the Stride action, despite not normally being allowed to do so. The section on movement types says: Most characters and monsters have a speed statistic—also called land Speed—which indicates how quickly they can move across the ground. So under normal circumstances your intuition would be correct: they couldn'...


4

What is this "standard" damage? 2d6, because this is the printed damage of a Greatsword This is the correct answer. The spell Storm of Blades doesn't say "standard damage" it says each sword "deals the same damage as a standard sword of the type expended". The "standard" refers to the base type of the sword, so even ...


6

There's a lot in the post, but it seems to be that your actual question is this: Can a mage simply open them with knock (presuming they know the spell and have it prepared)? The answer is "yes". Dimensional Shackles: You can use an action to place these shackles on an Incapacitated creature. The shackles adjust to fit a creature of Small to ...


0

The armor can't be removed against your will. The rules are pretty clear that nothing can remove the armor unless you allow it. When you integrate armor, you "incorporate it into your body". It's not just gear anymore, it's a part of you, as much as your arm or leg. However, there are no spells in the book that can remove armor from anyone, ...


2

There is no limit on the number of different types of bonuses you can have. The core rules list the different modifier types found in core, but nothing says those are the only types there are—and non-core books invent new modifier types all the time, without making a big deal about it. It’s rare for them to even bother “explaining” that type of bonus, ...


1

Yes, dispel magic can dispel a multi target buff spell. Note that dispel magic ends the whole spell, even if you are only targeting a specific creature with your dispel casting. The dispel magic spell does not end individual effects, it ends whole spells or spell-like abilities. According to dispel magic: A dispelled spell ends as if its duration had ...


12

Your armor can only be removed if you are dead. Integrated Protection states: While you live, the armor incorporated into your body can’t be removed against your will. This is not ambiguous. The armor cannot be removed against your will, unless you are dead. D&D 5e has a specific beats general rule: This compendium contains rules that govern how the ...


11

If a feature requires that movement be willing, it will say so. Consider booming blade: If the target willingly moves 5 feet or more before then, the target takes 1d8 thunder damage, and the spell ends. Features tell you when movement must be willing movement to trigger the feature. How else are you supposed to know that it requires willing movement? Since ...


11

Detect thoughts. This spell should get the job done quite easily: For the duration, you can read the thoughts of certain creatures. When you cast the spell and as your action on each turn until the spell ends, you can focus your mind on any one creature that you can see within 30 feet of you. If the creature you choose has an Intelligence of 3 or lower or ...


9

Detect Thoughts, as per Thomas Markov's answer, is the most intuitive solution. I've listed below some other, more obscure spells which could identify the crow as being 'awakened'. They're not obscure in themselves, but they're pretty unlikely solutions: all of them require the caster to be pretty paranoid, and most of them require the caster to be weirdly ...


6

It would appear so It's hard to know if it's intended or not, but it is a consistent way to interpret the rules, depending on how you interpret p.54 of the Monster Manual, which tells us that: A demon can be forced to disclose its name if charmed There are two ways of reading this into your question: This specific rule overrides the general rules of ...


17

No, you still only take half damage on a failed save The problem is that the both the Fizban's platinum shield spell and the Evasion feature state that you take "half damage"; they don't state that you halve the damage. Whether you have either or both abilities, the damage you take on a failed save is changed from the full amount to half the full ...


14

Does what it says on the tin. The Monster Manual rules for AC state: a monster’s AC is based on its Dexterity modifier and natural armor, if any. If a monster has natural armor, wears armor, or carries a shield, this is noted in parentheses after its AC value. This indicates that the listed AC on a monster's stat block accounts for the dexterity modifier. ...


2

I think there are two misconceptions which make the tattoos seem too good. I'll cover them first, and then try to give a fair comparison. Spells use their normal casting time Since Spellwrought tattoos make no mention of it, casting the spell requires the normal casting time. This is the same as for spell scrolls (fixed by an errata to the DMG). Magic ...


1

Produced by a special needle, this magic tattoo contains a single spell of up to 5th level, wrought on your skin by a magic needle. To use the tattoo, you must hold the needle against your skin and speak the command word. The needle turns into ink that becomes the tattoo, which appears on the skin in whatever design you like. Once the tattoo is there, you ...


12

There are multiple restrictions on the Spellwrought Tattoo The restrictions require a little bit of cross-referencing with the Dungeon Master's Guide and inference, but they certainly exist. To go through your objections in order: Casting Time Since the tattoo does not provide a casting time, we refer to the default rules for how magic items grant ...


2

Yes, with some help You need two spellcasters, 7th level Warlock or Wizard with Metamagic Adept feat (Extended Spell) and a 9+ level Bard, Cleric, Druid or Wizard. If you want a foolproof plan, one of spellcasters must be a Divination wizard who rolled a Portent die sufficiently low (10 or less will do). Pick the following spells: Magic Circle and Summon ...


5

Yes, you can You will appear in random place in your home plane. You might not return to the plane where you meet the caster of maze spell, if that plane is not your home plane. Your DM might rule that being banished, even for one second, might qualify as 'escape the maze', so the maze spell will end and you don't need to concentrate on banishment. ...


4

Mind blank foils the most powerful spell in the game. Tasha’s mind whip is no challenge. The utility of mind blank is clear: it is meant to protect your mind from any spell, even the all powerful wish spell. That said, it will be up to the DM what counts as affecting a targets mind. In the case of mind whip, it deals psychic damage and is resisted by an ...


1

You need both skills. This somewhat confusingly-worded section pertains to your ability to recognize the "signature" of a spellcaster the next time you see it. Here's the full text of that section (emphasis mine): Finally, you are able to locate and analyze the signature flourishes in a magical aura that allow you to match a spell to the person ...


3

There are no available options to do this Which is frustrating for you regarding your preference to keep your monster/NPC making follow PC rules. (Un)fortunately, as DM, you are free to make your NPCs however you like. Yes, it means they can do things that players can't, but the RAW Monsters have abilities that players don't get, either. It's okay to dip ...


4

You can probably come close This does depend heavily on your setting, specifically the details of "what exactly happens to your soul when it dies?" I don't know the answer to that question for any official setting, but if you're the DM then you get to choose for your setting. As long as the answer is something like "Your soul travels to a ...


16

No To put it simply, there are no individual spells (short of Wish) that can do what you want. Either you resurrect someone with free will, or you change their stat block. Alternatives... You are the DM, and you have a great deal of latitude here. As you said, you could just make up some plot device magic spell...but there are some closer-to-RAW solutions ...


2

Saving Finale is weird Strange title, right? But it's true... Saving Finale works "because magic". Moreso than other magic, anyway. Specifically, it allows Bards to react to something that they are not aware of and, by the rules, do not know about. Specifically, Bards do not have any way (outside of meta) to know when a creature has failed a saving ...


0

I dare say that because the way they worded the effect: On a failed save, a creature can’t speak a deliberate lie while in the radius. That they actually intended for players to be able to feel smart about themselves and think ‘ohh they say speak!’ The people behind D&D have plenty of experience with how phrases in rules are overanalyzed. They could ...


2

Think of it like this. Without knowing Chinese, how to read, write or speak it...copy down a page of Chinese text from a recipe book. Then, years later, having learned Chinese, use that page of text by handing it over to a waiter, and you have to eat whatever he brings you. Magic results may be worse than that, it's notoriously finicky, and the waiter can be ...


5

Yes, you can lie non-verbally if you fail a ZoT save The magical zone created by ZoT guards against deception: You create a magical zone that guards against deception But there are multiple ways of satisfying that description. ZoT does not have to guard against all deception, or eliminate every possibility of deception. It just guards against deception. ...


11

I agree that they can lie non-verbally, as the rules specify the the target cannot speak a lie. However, even if they can, the conjurer knows their own magic and will probably just tell others "They need to speak, or else the spell won't work, do not trust their gestures!" They could also just refuse to answer the question. "I do not want to ...


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