New answers tagged

0

Potentially any spell can be tattooed First, for your specific case of having Burning Hands tattooed on your hand, note the existing Spell Tattoo which works in a similar way to a scroll and is just a one time use. The price listed for this tattoo is: A spell tattoo has a market price four times as much as an equivalent scroll. So for a normal Burning ...


4

The spell descriptions don't conflict. Plants with creature statistics are creatures. The Monster Manual defines the "plant" creature type as follows (p. 7): Plants in this context are vegetable creatures, not ordinary flora. Most of them are ambulatory, and some are carnivorous. This definition includes all creatures of the "plant" type. If the PCs ...


9

Which spell description is correct? Both Fabricate The description of Fabricate states that: You convert raw materials into products of the same material. For example, you can fabricate a wooden bridge from a clump of trees, [...] (Emphasis Mine) The spell converts raw materials into products and as stated in the description you can make a bridge ...


3

D&D Beyond's Spell Index D&D Beyond is an offically licensed digital resource for 5e, and their spell section allows for filtering by class, school, level, as well as a myriad of other properties for the spells. The SRD spells are availible directly through their site, but non-SRD content will require a purchase (still very useful as an index).


0

There is a great spell list over at donjon.bin.sh that allows you to show spells by class, school, as well as a bunch of other criteria.


2

Yes, and sort of The description of the time stop spell says: during which you can use actions It says actions, multiple. A bonus action is an additional action: Various class features, spells and other abilities let you take an additional action on your turn called a bonus action. So the bonus action is an action and combined with your normal ...


17

RAW - Yes, a time stop user has both bonus action and reaction available while you take 1d4 + 1 turns in a row Emphasis mine. A turn is what let's a character do anything in a round of combat, and there's nothing in the wording of timestop to suggest that the turns you experience during time stop are unusual in any way, just that they happen one after ...


14

You need only one hand free Eldritch Blast has the Verbal and Somatic components indicated by "Components V, S". Looking at the rules for spell components (Verbal is not relevant regarding free hands so not included): Each spell's description indicates whether it requires verbal (V), somatic (S), or material (M) components. (...) Somatic (S) ...


3

Whatever the answer, it is not "just look the spell description" The PHB states (page 204): A typical spell requires you to pick one or more targets to be affected by the spell’s magic. A spell’s description tells you whether the spell targets creatures, objects, or a point of origin for an area of effect... If we wanted to only say a spell targets ...


6

Yes, you can. The spell Eldritch Blast is listed as having Verbal and Somatic Components. Under the rules for Somatic Components, you can see the following rules text: Somatic (S) Spellcasting gestures might include a forceful gesticulation or an intricate set of gestures. If a spell requires a somatic component, the caster must have free use of ...


-1

While I agree with the general sentiment that the glyph seal is OP as written, may I propose another, more entertaining (IMHO) way of nerfing it; rather than conjecture the missing word "harmful" into the description, suppose that what has been omitted from RAW is the limitation that only one can be placed on an opening. You could still have the ...


15

Your interpretation is correct When the haste spell ends, the target cannot move. This counts as being "otherwise deprived of the ability to move" for the sake of remaining aloft. The creature would therefore begin to fall unless it has the ability to hover. I researched this part of the rules when writing this related answer and there are no "subtle ...


6

Spells with no components cannot be counterspelled Counterspell says that it is cast as a reaction which you take when you see a creature within 60 feet of you casting a spell So a spell must be visibly being cast in order to qualify for counterspelling. The components of a spell are what make the casting visible since a spell can have no effects (...


14

Spell attacks use your spellcasting ability The Player’s Handbook says about spell attacks: Some spells require the caster to make an attack roll to determine whether the spell effect hits the intended target. Your attack bonus with a spell attack equals your spellcasting ability modifier + your proficiency bonus. So in the case of Flame Blade, you ...


20

It uses your spellcasting modifier and proficiency The pertinent part of the flame blade spell description says: You can use your action to make a melee spell attack with the fiery blade. On a hit, the target takes 3d6 fire damage. Melee spell attacks are also covered in PHB pg. 206, in the "Attack Rolls" section of the Spellcasting chapter (emphasis ...


0

Yes, you could. You would accomplish this by throwing it 10 feet above the target location. This might require an improvised weapon attack vs AC 5, in order to hit the correct 5 foot “square”. It then falls, and takes 1d6 falling damage, setting off the stored spell.


16

Creatures that can't cast spells use disks for buffs The 6th-level Sor/Wiz spell Shalantha's delicate disk [conj] (Lost Empires of Faerûn 33) compares favorably with other methods of casting upon the creature that ruins the disk spell effect a spell that the creature couldn't normally benefit from. For example, a potion of divine power (4th-level spell ...


3

Rules as written, throwing it would not accomplish anything. Despite being “delicate,” it turns out to not really be delicate at all from this perspective. The reason why is Shalantha’s delicate disk is triggered when it takes 1 point of damage, and being thrown just doesn’t do that. Thrown weapons do not take damage for being thrown, or more broadly, ...


0

"No matter where you go, there you are...." In order to understand the Wish spell, one needs to understand the roots and origin. OD&D Limited Wish 7th Level Magic User A spell which alters reality past, present, or future, but only within limited bounds. It cannot create or bring any form of treasure, for example, and only a portion of a ...


3

No, because it targets two creatures. Based on the extensive discussion Jeremy Crawford (the Sage in Sage Advice and official WotC rules guy) had in the January 19th, 2017 episode of the official DragonTalk podcast about spell targeting in general and twinning in specific, warding bond is not a valid spell for twinning. When the Twinned Spell metamagic ...


4

D&D 5e is a bit ambiguous with its terms, so there is probably never going to be a comprehensive answer The linked podcast is probably the best source of Rules as Intended we'll get. It says that "target" should be used in its natural English language meaning. This means that anything affected by a spell can be considered a target. I'm going to use ...


2

The rules for spell targeting state: A typical spell requires you to pick one or more targets to be affected by the spell’s magic. A spell’s description tells you whether the spell targets creatures, objects, or a point of origin for an area of effect (described below). Unless a spell has a perceptible effect, a creature might not know it was ...


10

Warding Bond may or may not be compatible with Twinned Spell, the rules are somewhat ambiguous here I personally don't think you can use Twinned Spell because Warding Bond has effects that apply to both the touched creature and to the spell's caster. From the spell description (in the basic rules, and online here): While the target is within 60 feet of ...


2

Yes, you will probably need a third ring though In order for a spell to eligible for Twinned Spell1 it needs to only be able to target one creature: Twinned Spell When you cast a spell that targets only one creature and doesn’t have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell’s level to target a second creature in ...


3

No It's arguable that you can't twin Warding Bond because it has two targets (the other creature and the caster), which means it's not eligible to be twinned. Even if you don't subscribe to this interpretation, the description of Warding Bond states that there is a material component: a pair of platinum rings worth at least 50 gp each, which you and the ...


0

Twinned Spell: When you Cast a Spell that Targets only one creature and doesn’t have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell’s level to target a second creature in range with the same spell (1 sorcery point if the spell is a cantrip). Warding Bond: This spell wards a willing creature you touch and creates a mystic ...


1

The rules are a little vague on how exactly Warding Bond works, so this answer leans on unofficial advice from the lead rules designer, Jeremy Crawford. But first, the Shield Guardian's Bound trait states: [...] half of any damage the wearer takes (rounded up) is transferred to the guardian Also, the rule for the Warding Bond spell states: [T]he ...


2

There are a few funky corners here. The main one is the wording of Shield Guardian's relevant ability: half of any damage the wearer takes (rounded up) is transferred to the guardian. Transferring damage is not an effect that I could find referenced anywhere else in the rulebooks that I own, and even taken as plain English (trasfer: to move from one ...


2

We have good answers explaining what the DM can do, strong arguments in favor of various things they should do, and helpful pointers to what (little) advice the rules actually offer for how you would do. This answer is a little different, a little meta, and maybe should have been a comment but I wasn’t sure about that. Specifically, I wanted to address this:...


1

First, I want to say I agree with answer by Hey I Can Chan: the only rules in the rulebooks about gauging new spells require comparing them to existing effects. That said, it is not always feasible. Thus, I was using, and I am using, the following method to gauge new spells and spell-equivalent effects: If I can come up with any spell + metamagic ...


5

Just for clarity, the 9th-level Sor/Wiz spell wish [univ] (Player's Handbook 302–3), in part, says, "A wish can produce any one of the following effects[, and y]ou may try to use a wish to produce greater effects than these, but doing so is dangerous" (302). The wish spell's list of safe effects include duplicating the effect of up to an 8th-level Sor/Wiz ...


-3

Wish enumerates a list of things that it can do and then goes on to say: You may try to use a wish to produce greater effects than these, but doing so is dangerous. (The wish may pervert your intent into a literal but undesirable fulfillment or only a partial fulfillment.) Greater is the comparative of great. So the things that are listed are 'great' and ...


14

Your Firbolg Druid cannot cast their racial Detect Magic as a ritual The rules for ritual casting are given in the Spellcasting chapter of the basic rules: Certain spells have a special tag: ritual. Such a spell can be cast following the normal rules for spellcasting, or the spell can be cast as a ritual. The ritual version of a spell takes 10 minutes ...


1

Yes, you still need concentration Planar Binding says that If the creature was summoned or created by another spell, that spell's duration is extended to match the duration of this spell. Note that the spell duration is extended, not replaced or changed. Hence, if the duration of the summoning spell was Concentration, up to one hour, Planar Binding ...


2

No The basic rule for targeting reads: To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover. If you place an area of effect at a point that you can't see and an obstruction, such as a wall, is between you and that point, the point of origin comes into being on the near side of that obstruction. The relevant point here ...


0

No, a dragon's breath cannot, in general, pass through Leomund's Tiny Hut The key line of the spell that prevents it is emphasised in this quote: Creatures and objects within the dome when you cast this spell can move through it freely. All other creatures and objects are barred from passing through it. Spells and other magical effects can't extend ...


1

No, you would not be able to affect a starship weapon with that spell (or most others). Assuming you've found some way to Touch your weapon safely while in combat maneuvers (no mean feat)... From the Starship Combat section, Shooting Starships Starship weapons and regular PC-level weapons work on different scales and aren’t meant to interact with ...


0

The answer is complicated by the fact that several variant writeups of this spell exist. If one bases the answer on the writeup linked in the body of the question: Leomund's tiny hut (which, BTW, is not Leomund's original!) then the hut as described has a major vulnerability: it is open from below, as the forcefield is a hemisphere. Digging under is not ...


4

You can't cast on something behind cover or out of range, even if you can see it. Relevant question: Is it possible to attack enemies through a scrying sensor? You could cast a spell using Hag Eye if the path is obscured visually, such as by Fog Cloud, as long as there is still a clear path and the target is in range. If there isn't a clear, direct path or ...


-1

Purely my opinion, but this would be one of the many occasions I rely on a random 1d20 roll as a DM. High is good (known part of world/on or near ground level,) low is bad (Unknown location/Miles out to sea and underwater.) Upon further review, the spell makes the target INCAPACITATED, which is a condition that immediately ends spell concentration, so by ...


11

You need to find a written source As per the Ritual Caster feat's description (PHB, p. 169; emphasis mine): If you come across a spell in written form, such as a magical spell scroll or a wizard’s spellbook, you might be able to add it to your ritual book. The spell must be on the spell list for the class you chose, the spell’s level can be no higher ...


3

It’s ambiguous, and unfortunately, I would say the stronger case can be made for “no.” First, some rules quotes: Touch spells in combat In the same round that you cast the spell [that has a range of touch], you may also touch (or attempt to touch) the target. You may take your move before casting the spell, after touching the target, or between casting ...


2

Probably not, no. Metamagic feats frequently say “you can” do something special with a spell, whether that’s change its type of energy damage, change its range, or increase its area. Saying “you can” typically means “you don’t have to,” however in the case of metamagic feats, the choice whether or not to do so happens when you choose to use the metamagic ...


-2

I'll go with a dictionary definition... What is an "object"? Well, according to Merriam Webster an object can be "something material that may be perceived by the senses" (according to definition 1.a). So how do we define "something material"? It's something "relating to, derived from, or consisting of matter" (according to definition 1.a.1)... So how do ...


2

Yes, yes, and yes. We already have a Q&A on swift actions and full-round actions in Pathfinder, and the rules are the same in D&D 3.5e: you can use a swift action any time you could use a free action (barring, of course, when you have already used a swift action that round), and full-round actions like a full-attack specify that you can use free ...


-2

The very notion that it is a sphere of darkness (darkness that spreads to fill a sphere) assumes that light can't go through, otherwise the sphere itself would be transparent. It has to absorb light to appear as darkness. And obviously, if light can't pass through it, it casts a shadow.


3

There are five different ways this can go I will refer collectively to the damage changing effects as "damage movers" I would argue that both warding bond's damage sharing and the Shield Guardian's damage transfer occur after you actually take the damage. With warding bond this is more obvious, as it says "each time it takes damage" which would require you ...


3

All of them Intuitively, if a spell can be cast when it's impossible to meet a restriction such as the 10' minimum for each dimension, the intention for the spell is something different. For these walls it seems the intention was that they are treated as flat area, even though they must have a thickness. Effectively most walls are two-dimensional, and both ...


5

The creature "dies" when Simulacrum ends True Polymorph lists many things in its spell description, but one thing it does not mention is magical effects. Casting True Polymorph on a target does not end or alter any other magical effects that were already affecting that target. In this case, Simulacrum is an active magical effect on our True Polymorph ...


3

Simulacrum lists the duration as "Until Dispelled". If Dispel Magic succeeds the spell would end and the creature should be dispelled. Consider a later Dispel Magic that ends the True Polymorph, what would the creature revert to? Ruling that the creature remains until True Polymorph is dispelled doesn't seem like a big stretch, but I can't find support ...


Top 50 recent answers are included