28

Using Spout Lore to reveal a detailed, pre-created world is contrary to the rules. There is a caveat I should make here. I'm going to talk about rules the GM has to follow. You're welcome to not consider them binding rules, but DW as designed does. If you don't follow the GM rules, you're "voiding the warranty" on the game and it will not operate as ...


26

Neither of those are the moves' triggers, so not triggering makes sense. It sounds like the problem generally has been that you're trying to do the title and result of the move instead of its trigger. Focus on the trigger instead, and the moves will more reliably trigger. Discern Realities isn't triggered by asking the GM questions, it's triggered “[w]hen ...


20

Well, there's good news and bad news. The bad news is that it isn't really intended as a limitation that your player has to tell you anything about where they learned it. The good news is they also can't demand you tell them exactly what they want to hear. (Because Spout Lore's a basic move I'll just be referring to the relevant player as "a loremaster".) ...


18

Your Option #4 is not a valid option. Page 66 of the Dungeon World rulebook says: Just in case it isn’t clear: the answers are always true, even if the GM had to make them up on the spot. Always say what honesty demands. Instead of giving them false information, you can give them something interesting, but not useful. "You know that Orcs like to dance ...


15

First of all, players don't "use" moves. A move is something that player character's actions might trigger, but the trigger itself is at the GM's discretion. If you don't see any decent possible consequences, don't call for the Spout Lore move. Just give players the information they asked for, preferably making a GM move in the process. See also ...


11

On a partial success, I try to say something that is designed to get the response "why?" For example: You only remember one thing - the citizens of Oostar never eat lamb. Beef, goat, and smeerp are all OK, but not lamb. The typical response to that is, "Don't eat lamb? Why?" The fact is not useful right now (but I could imagine a scenario where the ...


9

I have this rich setting with plenty of details ... I'd like to give them a lot of information contextual to locations and events happening around. I don't know if I'm still in my D&D mindset but I see it like that. Dungeon World will probably work better for you if you work with the players to establish the setting by asking a lot of questions at ...


9

One option I'd suggest is to ask the GM during play after your narration doesn't trigger the desired move. "I'm trying to trigger Discern Realities here; what kind of action would help do that?" This way you get a feel for what your particular GM thinks is necessary to trigger the move and might even help remind him to look for it, in case he just missed it....


6

Know why it's not useful. There are a couple of ways to approach the problem of presenting the PCs with information that is interesting, and not useful, and that is up to them to make useful. They all start with coming up with something interesting, and it doesn't sound like that's a problem for you. If the interesting thing is useful, come up with an ...


6

I mostly agree with Glazius, though my answer differs slightly I think. So first things first with every move: watch out for the trigger and you decide when a move is triggered, not the players. (though of course it is not against the rules for the players to say what move they want to trigger) The trigger for spout lore is: "When you consult your ...


5

The answer by SevenSidedDie is absolutely correct. Let me just add that you should try to only look at the moves "out of the corner of your eye" and concentrate on just being a Druid. Ask yourself, "How would a Druid try to understand this situation? How would a Druid fit this into his/her world-view? What would make sense to a person who deeply understands ...


3

Say "I want to Spout Lore" or "I want to Discern Realities". Maybe not exactly that, but do actually say the names of the moves you're trying to make. Dungeon World can get on just fine if you have no idea what move you want to make, and just say what your character is doing, and let your GM figure out how to turn that into a move if it's necessary. But ...


2

I don't know your group, but you can remind them that they mark experience when they roll a 6-. This is something that few games do this well: *World games 'encourages' (some might say 'bribe', but not me!) players to take certain actions by rewarding with XP like nobody else! And they do it without remorse. It might be considered metagaming in some ...


1

This is a tricky topic with a number of angles to approach it from. Any of them could lead to interesting things about your campaign world, or to a better common understanding of what everyone's at the table to do. Vision You may be suffering from a mismatch with your players about what kind of story you're here to tell. Your players seem to have the ...


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