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8

Anything 3 and up is in the realm of normal function. The range for PC strength is 3-18. Thus a character with a strength of 3 might be a weakling who cannot effectively wield a weapon or move with any speed in armor, but they are capable of normal human function. In other words, dressed in normal clothing, such a character can move around without difficulty ...


7

Theatrix The game you're thinking of is Theatrix (1993). It utilized plot points as its resolution system, and came packaged with a set of cardstock handout sheets that contained the flow chart you describe.


6

Give them a good reason to open it, deceive them into opening it, or have it opened for them My players are generally extremely cautious about anything they think I want them to do, especially without a lot of context that give them an understanding of the broader situation around that thing. It can be frustrating, and is not always easily controllable. If ...


4

A Revenant would be the archetypical thing who is out to get someone, no matter what. Though Revenants are about dishing out revenge to whoever killed them, a smart BBEG might be able to trick one to track the party instead. Maybe the party carries a MacGuffin that makes the Revenant track them instead of the real murderer. The downside is, as level 6 ...


3

It’s the culture. Wherever it is that your characters are, the cultural expectation is that military commanders lead from the front. That doesn’t mean they have to be in every single battle personally—they can order army A to fight in one place under a subordinate while they stay with army B—but a commander who rarely or never gets into the thick of the ...


3

Make them an encounter they can't refuse Per the item description on Roll20, An Identify spell reveals that a creature is inside the flask, but the only way to determine the type of creature is to open the flask. A newly discovered bottle might already contain a creature chosen by the DM or determined randomly. If there's a Bard or a Wizard in the party, ...


2

Promise them stuff they want if they do. You know what the players want- wealth, magical items, fame, fortune, a chance to be good people. Whatever they seem to value. Put an adventure in front of them where there's a large amount of whatever they value, and have the flask promise to solve that problem for them if they throw it. Then, the lich can use their ...


1

(This is homebrew, so take this with caution — we've used this homebrew with success in our home games) What to do with low ability stats? It is generally a more interesting narrative technique to have an exaggerated thing, vs many finely granular distinctions detailed. What is a low stat? By long convention, an ability score of 10 or 11 is considered ...


1

So I'm doing my very first homebrew campaign. Here is how I'm bringing my party together: During character creation, one of the requirements is to have their backstory put them at a specific city when the campaign begins. This way they're all in the same area. Then, each of the PCs have a mysterious dream that shows a certain location in the city (which is ...


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