28

I sat down with both PDFs this morning and compared them system-by-system, drawing on my experience with B/X D&D and Adventurer Conqueror King System to zero-in on the parts of early D&D that frequently vary and make the most difference. These notes apply only to core Swords & Wizardry (not White Box), and core Labyrinth Lord (not including ...


6

It depends on your Intelligence score (but work with your GM) This answer is based on the 4th printing, Swords and Wizardry, Core Rules, 2011. On page 7, the chance to learn a given spell is laid out in a table. I'll use three examples. Int of 13, Int of 15, and an Int of 17, and only using the columns in that table for the Int score, the % chance to ...


6

Where the table has a number, your roll needs to meet or exceed that number to turn that type of undead. Where the table has a T, that type of undead are turned automatically regardless of what you rolled. For example, a 4th-level cleric is facing a wight, a pair of ghouls, and a half-dozen zombies. The cleric makes a turning attempt. The zombies are ...


4

The rules do indeed not specify, so you have two approaches: First, recognize that S&W is based off of Dungeons&Dragons, and that in that game, you can only prepare spells after sleeping. I think the logic is that you need your mind to be in a fresh state. It makes sense to use the same rule in S&W, and the Cleric class has a similar restriction....


3

That's correct! The second case you describe (in which the value of the trade-outs exceeds the total GP value of the hoard) is how a “Major” treasure hoard is randomly determined. In that case, yes, the hoard consists of all the trade-outs you randomly determined plus all the original gold piece value, as per the note under the main trade-outs table (p. 120):...


3

I'm not familiar with "White Lies Admin Toolkit" but having been there at the genesis and fleshing out of S&W White Box, I can talk about the approach. The idea was to reflect, as closely as possible, the classes of the original D&D game from 1974, using the general approach of Swords & Wizardry (1 Saving Throw, AAC, etc.). So most of the "math"...


2

I define the Charm spell's effects as "big brother hero worship". Imagine a small boy who adores his big brother. In the eye of the younger boy, the big brother can do no wrong. Anything the older boy asks, the younger will do, because he wants his bother's approval. However, all hero worship has its limits. At some point the younger boy is going to ...


1

I take best friends plus a lack of critical thought about the framing of the situation. To take the orphan example from the accepted answer--you're not going to get the good guy to kill the orphans. On the other hand, you might get the good guy to kill those demons that simply look like kids.


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