90

The term I have heard the most would be Support, as it is their role to assist the other party members. While in a lot of system Healers double as Supports, or Supports double as Healers, they're not the same thing. It highly depends on the system, though. For demonstration of these terms: My next character in an upcoming Pathfinder campaign is a "Rogue ...


89

NautArch's answer of "Session Zero" is an excellent starting place, and should be the first option. If, however, everyone claims to be on the same page - and that page is "adventure in the great wide world" - yet there are still those who want to sweep floors for 3 months then buy enough gear to plow through whatever comes, there are still some tools to ...


63

It's pretty trivial if you allow occasional discarding of rolls/rerolls. d2 (gonna need this later): if result is odd, read as a 1. If result is even, read as a 0. d4: discard any results of 5 or 6.* d5 (gonna need this, too): discard any result of 6. d6: done. d8: roll d2 and d4. Result is d2×4 + d4. d10: roll d2 and d5. Result is d2×5 + d5. d12: roll d2 ...


58

As a GM, the solutions are all about providing more information: Sounds and Trails When they examine their choices, give them hints what lies down each passage. A part of the dungeon in use by kobolds looks different from one in which there is a gelatinous cube, and again different from one used by necromancers. If you tell them at a junction "Down the ...


55

Coming from a D&D point of view... The game becomes a lot more mobile, speed is more valuable, the concept of front-liner diminishes, and being at range is either difficult or not important. I tried this for a one-shot once with a couple of new players, and we removed OAs for simplicity's sake. The more experienced players at the table had some fun ...


40

You missed a step ... Session 0 comes after the pitch. The pitch is the sales pitch the gamemaster puts out to see if anyone (other than them) is interested in playing. Now, you did put that out there but not in sufficient detail. If your new campaign was going to be just like your old campaign but with giants instead of dragons (like Wizards of the Coast do ...


38

To me it sounds like this is the start of the campaign, so simply do that - start it off with this scene of them getting that thing, maybe even before character creation, so that they know they need to make a character that would make such a decision. Or talk to your players. For a more concrete answer we would probably need information like who are your ...


34

When I've felt the need to do this, I've simply written on the book's pages, in pencil if that would show up clearly on the page and not smudge, else in ink. The margin had enough space for noting short errata directly. The only time I had long errata, I printed them out on a sheet of paper that I could put between the cover and the first page, and made ...


32

While Support is the most common name—found widely even outside of RPGs, as video games use it frequently as well—it may be worth noting that the official terminology for D&D 4e—the only edition of D&D to officially codify roles like this—is that such classes are “Leaders.” That terminology may be used by D&D 4e players in other systems, even non-...


27

Time for a Session Zero If you haven't already run a Session Zero, then it's definitely time to do so. If you have, then it's probably time to have another one. It sounds like everyone isn't on the same page about what they want/expect from the game. A session zero is an opportunity and a tool to get everyone on the same page. There may be compromises that ...


27

Obviously, this question cannot have an objective apply-everywhere answer, however, I can tell you what works and doesn't work for me. Session Feedback Is Not Very Useful I also ask my players if they had fun during the session, and their answer is also "Yeap, it was great, I had fun!". The thing is that if your players/friends are even slightly polite ...


24

An alternative solution that may or may not involve fewer steps: Two rolls of d6 give you a d36 the same way as two d10 give you a d100: 6×(d6-1) + d6. Now, fill in as many multiples of the range you're interested in as you can fit, and discard the rest. For instance: d20: Roll d36. If the result is between 1 and 20 - keep it. Otherwise - roll again. ...


24

The leadership scenario is sometimes inevitable depending on the players you have. It's natural for more experienced players to fall into a leadership role because they have more experience and newer players (or sometimes experienced players who don't want to take charge) aren't comfortable making big decisions and the party lacks direction. Overall it's ...


23

0. Nobody can force players to do anything. Unless it's part of the campaign premise, anyway. No matter what you drop in front of them, if they have a choice in the matter, they can take it. Whatever approach you take, keep this in mind - they might just decide to pass on this, and there's nothing you can do about it. 1. Make it look appealing. If your ...


23

Trust players to remember their characters' actions honestly If a player says their character didn't do something then they should be trusted. Sometimes plots get confusing and we think something happened a certain way. When push comes to shove, however, the player is the one that knows best how their character would have acted. Ruling that a character did ...


22

Follow The Rules Your description says that players "have final say over what they do and don't do, subject to the rules of the game." In two of your examples (Xaratron stabbing and John casting), presumably your game system has some sort of mechanic in place for how to resolve an attempted stabbing, or how to resolve the effects of charm person. ...


17

To solve an interpersonal issue at the table, I would use a strategy that effective mediators use to solve disputes between conflicted parties (even though you're one of the parties). Identify the issue Frame it as a shared conflict Then propose a solution. This strategy helps solve co-worker conflicts, relationship disputes, and even tabletop issues! ...


17

No The sword shown, assuming the character is 1,90 meters big, has an area of 150x30 cm². If we assume it's only 0,5 cm thick (which is far too thin to actually give it any stability. It would wobble around like a sheet of paper), we get a volume of around 2000 cm³ and thus a weight of 15 kg. This is far beyond any kind of useful weapon weight. The heaviest ...


17

Use a dungeon with an interesting map If the map has several levels, hidden entrances, ways to see into other rooms without easy access, stairways, or simply loops, players can use their map (that they draw or you provide) to deduce where corridors and doors might lead to. Repeated expeditions If the dungeon is visited several times, then the navigational ...


16

Structure the game differently. Make time meaningful, make ordinary work too low-paying to interact with the game proper, make the plot about things that happen to your players rather than things your players seek out, or any number of other things. Make no mistake, if you allow this sort of play to lead to success without drawbacks, you will never be able ...


16

I had similar issue with my programming books. It was before cheap, fast, always-on mobile Internet access. I needed to mark things that were no longer up to date. Different topic, but the same exact problem. What worked for me was to print them on a really thin paper, cut out and just slip these between the pages, as close to the book spine as possible. ...


16

I frequently do this As PipperChip points out there are some issues that can theoretically arise, particularly where the two grid systems intersect. I use a hybrid system heavily when curved stairwells exist. However, in these cases, I actually use a third system: radial grid (think dartboard). I'm not saying this is a perfect system or that there isn't ...


16

The term appears to have originated in this blog post on Hack & Slash in 2011 (the website design now features the tagline "Home of the Quantum Ogre"), although the example the name comes from was defined in this blog post from Dreams in the Lich House it was a response to. The name comes from the fact that the behaviour of the world (exemplified by an ...


16

I have had the same problem before, there are some fairly simple solutions that worked for me: Have the players explain their own character's absence Have players come up with reasons for why their character can't make it or why they have been absent. If someone asks you, say "I don't know, ask them". We had a monk who often wouldn't show up, and ...


15

Only if your players are OK with it. There are some issues involving AoE and creature sizes effects: Any effect which hits one space and the surrounding spaces hits 9 spaces on a square grid but only 7 on a hex grid. AoE which originate at a corner and expand outward still don't cover the same amount: 1 space from a 'corner' is 4 spaces on squares and 3 ...


14

It is totally legitimate for a GM to accept/reject characters/rules/etc in his game. Some players might argue/question the decision but in the end, this should not cause offense unless you are very clumsy in how you announce and/or explain it. Personally, I recommend that you discuss why you do not want to allow it and your players should respect that. As ...


14

1. The Bandits Decided To Not Kill Him In fact, they saved his life so that they can torture him later on for information, revenge, or simply because they are sadistic. The NPC who was with him managed to escape and informed the group of the situation. Now, this becomes a quest for the group of breaking into the bandit camp and saving their friend. ...


13

Step 1: Communicate with the group I know, it's cliche here on SE. But it's really the best way to handle these things. Although you may feel they are disinterested, there could be various reasons for their behavior. Sometimes at a session I had a rough day at work, and it's just hard to focus on playing. I still enjoy it, but probably doesn't seem like it ...


13

"How can I change my approach to this "rule of cool" to be more inclusive of everyone?" I may not necessarily be speaking for your player, but I can speak from experience as a very good roleplayer who is very into immersive play, and also into creative play, that this is a style of creative play that I would not enjoy, and your whole question reads to me ...


12

Talk to your players before proceeding Religion can be very personal and is something very strongly rooted in the world we currently live in. Whether or not your players want their actual current religion to be a part of their fantasy game really needs to come from them. As you've noted, there are a lot of potential pitfalls about trying to incorporate a ...


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