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My rule of thumb, which I give great credit for my games being received with great interest, respect, attention, and being engaged seriously and pro-actively by my players, is to play everything out logically and fairly, without forcing results. So for my desire to have game worlds where characters (PCs and NPCs) may often survive a combat defeat, I address ...


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1. The Bandits Decided To Not Kill Him In fact, they saved his life so that they can torture him later on for information, revenge, or simply because they are sadistic. The NPC who was with him managed to escape and informed the group of the situation. Now, this becomes a quest for the group of breaking into the bandit camp and saving their friend. ...


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Direct Annotation I have held a print collection of copies of historical sources, that had annotations added with pencil regarding some particular sources if they were seen as a fake or not. That information stemmed from an essay that was published 30 years after the print edition of the sources was collected. The annotation in this case was a vital ...


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With apologies for the necromancy: the existing answers cover a lot of good points, but there's one more that bears mention. Avoid creating situations where the PCs are expected to be merely bystanders. Players are participants, not just spectators. When an Exciting Thing happens in a RPG, the default assumption is that the players are expected to get ...


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If something like this happens again, here are several things you could do(in order): Tell the player you think that whatever they want to do is a bad idea. You said that you and the player had a miscommunication problem. If they tell them it is a good idea, ask them why they think so. Continuing your example: Player 4: I move to the side of the road, ...


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Provide choices which affect the environment Perhaps the dungeon is filled with fog and there is a demonically powered ventilation fan with a runestone loose. Placing the runestone back will clear out some of the fog but may result in traps coming back online - or worse yet, reactivate whatever the compound was originally supposed to do. How many misplaced ...


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Use a dungeon with an interesting map If the map has several levels, hidden entrances, ways to see into other rooms without easy access, stairways, or simply loops, players can use their map (that they draw or you provide) to deduce where corridors and doors might lead to. Repeated expeditions If the dungeon is visited several times, then the navigational ...


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As a GM, the solutions are all about providing more information: Sounds and Trails When they examine their choices, give them hints what lies down each passage. A part of the dungeon in use by kobolds looks different from one in which there is a gelatinous cube, and again different from one used by necromancers. If you tell them at a junction "Down the ...


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Use a PDF copy of the book that you can modify instead. This is a strategy that was widely adopted by the community of the RPG Exalted back during the second edition of the game, where the errata documents reached hundreds of pages in length and dramatically altered how the game played. As a result, some fans compiled a file that would integrate with the ...


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The traditional way of dealing with errata (going back pre-war) was sticky-backed sheets of paper, precut to stick exactly over the wrong paragraphs. Licking and sticking was a ritual at whatever intervals changes were introduced. This could take an hour! We get lots of manuals in the museum where you stick them on edge and dozens of errata stickers fall ...


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If the errata is important enough for me to worry about keeping track of it, then I stop worrying about damaging the book and concern myself primarily with neatness. I care more about having the corrected rule at hand and legible than any value the books might eventually have as collectors item. To that end I measure out the space the defective rule takes ...


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