102

This kind of situation is up to the DM. D&D 5E isn't designed to handle these sort of situations. The system doesn't have any built-in mechanics for pregnancy, or whether pregnant creatures can be individually targeted by spells. The system simply doesn't have the rules to address it. So by Rule Zero, the DM should make the call. Note that the DM ...


100

You can't fire a fireball through a toad's mouth The rules don't technically define 'swallowed', but in plain English, swallowed things are concealed by the relevant anatomy. Therefore, if a creature is swallowed by a toad, other creatures are completely concealed by that obstacle and therefore have toadal cover. A target has total cover if it is ...


77

Let's set pregnancy aside for a moment and consider some other aspects of this issue. If you have harmful microbes in your body, does this spell leave them behind? If so, then it's effectively a Cure Disease for anything caused by foreign pathogens. That's the good news, but... Every human body contains a host of symbiotic bacteria that help us with ...


59

The range of Scrying is "self", so the caster targets him/herself first The spellcasting rules says that the target must be withing range: The target of a spell must be within the spell's range However, range of Scrying is "self", so initially the caster is targeting self, not the creature he/she is scrying: Scrying 5th-leveI divination ...


56

From the Basic Rules, p.80: Targeting Yourself If a spell targets a creature of your choice, you can choose yourself, unless the creature must be hostile or specifically a creature other than you. If you are in the area of effect of a spell you cast, you can target yourself. It appears that, as long as you can see yourself, you're a legal ...


56

'Rules as written' it's pretty tenuous, 'rules as intended' it's definitely out. Allowing this could easily break your game. Before I get into the details, consider the general principle that there are no secret rules in D&D 5e. So, always be suspicious of a reading of any feature that seems to allow additional benefits for only a small subset of users, ...


53

The pregnant creature and its unborn progeny remain together because as DMs, we strive to keep our games Humane There are a number of questions that we would be forced to ask and resolve if we attempted to make a purely RAW interpretation of this question—questions I have no intention of resolving. These questions include Is the unborn child considered its ...


44

This could potentially go both ways. The description for Scrying includes (emphasis mine): You can see and hear a particular creature you choose... As a DM, I would interpret this as particular = specific, so in this case your NPC/persona wouldn't be a valid target. This could lead to some mystery for the PC, as they try to figure out why they can't ...


41

This Would Not Work ...but not because of the way the Darkness spell works. This wouldn't work because of an issue with the way combat happens. Combat is taken in turns, but it doesn't actually happen in turns. Mechanically, only because of how hard it is to actually do otherwise, combat is consecutive, but in actuality, combat is simultaneous. Everyone ...


38

No, "all targets within 30 feet of each other" is a more flexible criterion We can show that the two criteria are not equivalent with a simple counterexample: suppose 3 targets are each 30 feet away from each other, such that they form an equilateral triangle with side length 30. The smallest circle that can enclose these 3 targets (known as the "...


37

The rules assume that facing direction doesn't matter. Therefore they routinely use "creature you can see" to mean "creature you could see, if you were to look in that direction". For example, opportunity attacks trigger when "a creature you can see" moves out of your reach. If the spell was intended to operate only in the direction the caster is looking ...


36

Yes, this is part of the GM's role. Adjudicating the actions of non-player characters, including (but not limited to) hostile NPCs, is one of the primary jobs of the DM. This is also mentioned in the Combat chapters of the PHB (p. 189) or the Player's Basic Rules (p. 69): The Dungeon Master controls all the monsters and nonplayer characters involved in ...


36

The Sorcerer can discriminate between invisible targets provided that they know the invisible targets are there Once you are aware of an invisible creature, provided they are not hidden, you know where it is (because they are still making noise, kicking up dust, etc.) but you cannot, in general, see them. If a spell specifies that you have to be able to ...


33

Yes, you can do this Well, first of all, the fireball spell description states: The fire spreads around corners. Rules designer Jeremy Crawford has unofficially clarified on Twitter what this means: Your cover is foiled if an effect spreads around it and reaches you. In addition, regarding spell targeting (and the targeting of Fireball in particular)...


32

Mirror image only affects attacks, and blight and magic missile aren't attacks. Mirror Image (PHB p.260): Three illusory duplicates of yourself appear in your space. Until the spell ends, the duplicates move with you and mimic your actions, shifting position so it’s impossible to track which image is real. You can use your action to dismiss the illusory ...


32

A random roll for location is the best solution when an Out of Character player knows the location but has to "guess" in-game without that knowledge. Given that, I'd like to discuss the times when there is and isn't a known location of a creature. The RAW regarding unseen attackers and hidden attackers is fairly clear, although it is also somewhat ...


31

A familiar from Find Familiar can't be awakened. The awaken spell needs to target a beast or plant: you touch a Huge or smaller beast or plant However, the familiar from find familiar is not considered a beast: the familiar has the statistics of the chosen form, though it is a celestial, fey, or fiend (your choice) instead of a beast. Therefore you ...


31

A target includes: creatures, objects, and locations. The PHB p194 states: Pick a target ...: a creature, an object or a location. For spells, PHB p204 states: A spell's description tells you whether the spell targets creatures, objects, or a point of origin... The Ghoul can use its Bite Action to target only other creatures, e.g. PCs, NPCs, beasts ...


31

No, creatures aren’t food, objects are food You can not use Purify Food and Drink to remove poison and disease from a humanoid as a humanoid is a creature, not an object. By this logic, you also can't use Create Food and Water to create a halfling as a halfling is a creature, not an object. Food and drinks are objects, not creatures. We know this because ...


30

Not likely, but a case could be made for it This is a bit of a tricky area, but in general we have go with the idea that things do what they say they do and no more. As with all things 5e, a DM can choose to view it differently, but looking at it through a RAW lens implies that the Paladin would still suffer the effects. The case for Infestation As I ...


30

Yes, a caster is affected by their own AOE unless the spell or ability states otherwise Cloudkill says: When a creature enters the spell’s area for the first time on a turn or starts its turn there, that creature must make a Constitution saving throw. The caster is "a creature" certainly, so, barring anything in the spell that says otherwise, they are ...


30

The target doesn't need to hear the whisper to be a valid target Dissonant Whispers notes that (PHB pg. 234): A deafened creature automatically succeeds on the save. Dissonant Whispers does still deal half damage on a successful save. So, even if the creature can't hear the whisper, it does still take damage, but it won't be forced to move away from the ...


28

The description of Fireball on D&D Beyond clearly says to choose a point within range. It makes no requirement for hitting a hard surface - it makes no requirement at all, other than picking a point. The spellcasting section says: To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover. If you place an area of effect ...


28

Can only target creatures The spell description spells this out fairly clearly (emphasis mine): Each dart hits a creature of your choice that you can see within range. Most spells that do target objects specify that the object must be unattended for the effect to take place, likely specifically to prevent this kind of disarming which can be un-fun (...


27

No An open container is an object, not a creature. Creatures are not objects, so the targeting the creature's mouth (which you also can't target because there aren't rules around targeting specific body parts) isn't an option.


26

There are 2 ways to resolve this that have been discussed by WOTC designers in an official capacity: One older option on a Sage Advice segment of one of their Dragon Talk podcasts here (specifically at about 13:12 for ~7.5 minutes), and one newer one in an optional rule provided by Xanathar's Guide to Everything's Dungeon Master's Tools chapter. The Sage ...


26

No, burning hands targets the creatures in its AOE Burning hands is noted as having targets specifically in the DMG The DMG specifically calls out the creatures affected by burning hands to be targets in an example: For example, if a wizard directs burning hands (a 15-foot cone) at a nearby group of orcs, you could use the table and say that two orcs ...


26

(these answers, IMO, also apply to the Monk's Purity of Body) RAW: Paladins are probably susceptible to Kyuss Worms Because of… Reasons. 5th edition did away with a lot of verbose text present in previous editions, in favor of "plain English interpretation". With that, we get a fallout of precise text that can be pointed to with that triumphant "A HA!" ...


26

The Simulacrum spell targets your Steed, but it won't copy it The spells Find Steed (and Find Greater Steed) both will allow you to target your steed as well as yourself with Simulacrum. However, the spell Simulacrum states (PHB, p. 276): You shape an illusory duplicate of one beast or humanoid that is within range for the entire casting time of the ...


26

Note up-front that allowing PC to ride another PC is already up to DM discretion as to whether the PC (the dragonborn in the case) has the "appropriate anatomy" to be a mount. Playing around with this can allow fun things like your gnome/dragonborn duo but also things like centaur stacks. The rules also clearly are not written to handle mounted stacks. But I ...


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