New answers tagged

3

Opportunity attacks can only be made against the provoking creature You can't make an attack of opportunity against the net, only the creature provoking the opportunity attack. From the rules under Opportunity Attacks from the Basic Rules (emphasis mine): You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach. ...


2

Opportunity attacks are only made against creatures From the Combat chapter of the PHB (p. 195; emphasis mine): You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach. Since a net is an object, not a creature, it does not provoke opportunity attacks.


2

The spell descriptions don't conflict. Plants with creature statistics are creatures. The Monster Manual defines the "plant" creature type as follows (p. 7): Plants in this context are vegetable creatures, not ordinary flora. Most of them are ambulatory, and some are carnivorous. This definition includes all creatures of the "plant" type. If the PCs ...


4

Which spell description is correct? Both Fabricate The description of Fabricate states that: You convert raw materials into products of the same material. For example, you can fabricate a wooden bridge from a clump of trees, [...] (Emphasis Mine) The spell converts raw materials into products and as stated in the description you can make a bridge ...


2

Whatever the answer, it is not "just look the spell description" The PHB states (page 204): A typical spell requires you to pick one or more targets to be affected by the spell’s magic. A spell’s description tells you whether the spell targets creatures, objects, or a point of origin for an area of effect... If we wanted to only say a spell targets ...


4

A vehicle is not a creature. First off, a vehicle isn't a creature. At best, it's an object. Many spells can harm objects, and the DM is always able to decide that a particular spell causes damage to objects even if its description doesn't specifically say so, because rules adjudication is their job. Whether a vehicle is an object depends on how the DM ...


3

No, because it targets two creatures. Based on the extensive discussion Jeremy Crawford (the Sage in Sage Advice and official WotC rules guy) had in the January 19th, 2017 episode of the official DragonTalk podcast about spell targeting in general and twinning in specific, warding bond is not a valid spell for twinning. When the Twinned Spell metamagic ...


3

D&D 5e is a bit ambiguous with its terms, so there is probably never going to be a comprehensive answer The linked podcast is probably the best source of Rules as Intended we'll get. It says that "target" should be used in its natural English language meaning. This means that anything affected by a spell can be considered a target. I'm going to use ...


2

The rules for spell targeting state: A typical spell requires you to pick one or more targets to be affected by the spell’s magic. A spell’s description tells you whether the spell targets creatures, objects, or a point of origin for an area of effect (described below). Unless a spell has a perceptible effect, a creature might not know it was ...


10

Warding Bond may or may not be compatible with Twinned Spell, the rules are somewhat ambiguous here I personally don't think you can use Twinned Spell because Warding Bond has effects that apply to both the touched creature and to the spell's caster. From the spell description (in the basic rules, and online here): While the target is within 60 feet of ...


2

Yes, you will probably need a third ring though In order for a spell to eligible for Twinned Spell1 it needs to only be able to target one creature: Twinned Spell When you cast a spell that targets only one creature and doesn’t have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell’s level to target a second creature in ...


3

No It's arguable that you can't twin Warding Bond because it has two targets (the other creature and the caster), which means it's not eligible to be twinned. Even if you don't subscribe to this interpretation, the description of Warding Bond states that there is a material component: a pair of platinum rings worth at least 50 gp each, which you and the ...


0

Twinned Spell: When you Cast a Spell that Targets only one creature and doesn’t have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell’s level to target a second creature in range with the same spell (1 sorcery point if the spell is a cantrip). Warding Bond: This spell wards a willing creature you touch and creates a mystic ...


1

No, you would not be able to affect a starship weapon with that spell (or most others). Assuming you've found some way to Touch your weapon safely while in combat maneuvers (no mean feat)... From the Starship Combat section, Shooting Starships Starship weapons and regular PC-level weapons work on different scales and aren’t meant to interact with ...


6

Interestingly, this power is being used to heal allies in a campaign I am GM'ing - none of us had noticed the "foe" wording you spotted. Having looked at the wording in context, I see this as a classic cut-and-paste error. The same wording "...targeting any foe within 30 feet as a ranged touch attack" is used in the descriptions of the Abyssal ...


0

The only things that target spell effects directly can target the mirror images. E.g. dispel magic targets spell effects Choose one creature, object, or magical effect within range


0

Be careful of the answers that imply Dispel Magic does anything other than end a spells duration. I think that is important to notice that Dispel Magic is a non-line-of-sight targeted spell. Mirror Image creates duplicates for 1 minute, that last the duration or till they take damage. Your target is the Mirror Image spell, not one of the duplicates. Dispel ...


10

I think you're being confused by the difference between the images being destroyed, and the spell ending. Dispel Magic doesn't destroy the images, it ends the spell/effect. Similarly, Mirror Image has a duration of 1 Minute. After this one minute, the spell ends, and the images wink out of existence, regardless of whether or not they were attacked. On ...


0

Dispel Magic can either target "one creature, object, or magical effect." If Dispel Magic targets the creature on which Mirror Image was cast, it doesn't destroy the duplicate, it ends the spell maintaining the duplicate (causing the duplicate to end). The clause in Mirror Image can't apply unless Dispel Magic specifically targets the duplicate. As the ...


6

Dispel Magic ends Mirror Image by targeting the creature Dispel Magic is a spell that can be used targeting a creature, requiring no attack roll: Choose one creature, object, or magical effect within range. Any spell of 3rd level or lower on the target ends. Mirror Image does not stop spells that directly target a creature with no attack roll (see this ...


22

Yes Dispel Magic works by targeting: Choose one creature, object, or magical effect within range. Any spell of 3rd level or lower on the target ends. You can target the effect, mirror image, or you can target the creature that has it. The specific rules around dispel magic allow for targeting of a spell effect when normally you don't (such as the ...


11

The duplicates aren't creatures Per the mirror image spell description: Three illusory duplicates of yourself appear in your space. Until the spell ends, the duplicates move with you and mimic your actions, shifting position so it's impossible to track which image is real. Nothing in the spell description says the duplicates are creatures - they're just ...


3

Depends on the effect, but probably no Both Goblin Boss and Tipsy Sway requires a creature: the goblin chooses another goblin hit one creature of your choice Illusory duplicates from the Mirror Image are not creatures, so, by the rules as written, you can't target them. Illusions are magic effects, not creatures neither objects, so they can't be ...


9

Fortunately or unfortunately, line of effect prohibits creating a disk in such a space The spell floating disk has the entry Effect 3-ft.-diameter disk of force, making it an effect spell, and Aiming a Spell on Line of Effect, in part, says, "You must have a clear line of effect… to any space in which you wish to create an effect." Thus in the same way a ...


7

Only Targets get to make a Save and are allowed Spell Resistance. If we look at the Targeting rules for spells we see: Some spells have a target or targets. You cast these spells on creatures or objects, as defined by the spell itself. Then we look at Saving Throws: Usually a harmful spell allows a target to make a saving throw to avoid some or all ...


-1

You sculpt the spell at the time of casting, and your choice affects all the meteors for the duration. The key issue here is how you interpret Sculpt Spell's "choose a number of them" language. Are you choosing creatures from among those affected by the spell, or do they just have to be creatures you can see? For most spells, it doesn't matter, as you know ...


10

As written, Sculpt Spells affects all saves against the spell As you quote in your question, the School of Evocation wizard's Sculpt Spells feature says: When you cast an evocation spell that affects other creatures that you can see, you can choose a number of them equal to 1 + the spell's level. The chosen creatures automatically succeed on their saving ...


0

Sculpted for the whole duration The spell is an evocation spell and it definitely affects other creatures so an evoked can use Sculpt Spells on it. This allows “chosen creatures automatically succeed on their saving throws against the spell, and they take no damage if they would normally take half damage on a successful save.” It doesn’t impose a limit on ...


1

Not inherently but you have to pick good numbers Climbing is weaker than flight, but spider climb is balanced against fly in the following ways: It's a lower level It can last up to 6 times longer It grants a climb speed that matches your normal speed, which can be much greater than 60 ft. When the spell ends you are much less likely to automatically fall, ...


-1

Melee Enemies might become pointless You're correct that Spider Climb is, in almost every way, a strictly inferior version of Fly. Fly gives more freedom of 3 dimensional movement, gives (most) characters an increase in speed, and can be cast on multiple creatures with higher spell slot usage. The only ways that Spider Climb has an advantage over Fly are a ...


9

You can cast it; it just wastes your action without doing anything. Xanathar's Guide to Everything (p. 85) says the following about what occurs if you cast a spell without a valid target: If you cast a spell on someone or something that can’t be affected by the spell, nothing happens to that target, but if you used a spell slot to cast the spell, the ...


3

I don't think that there's going to be an official answer to this by the DnD 5e developers (e.g. Sage Advice), because the Acquisitions Incorporated book was written by the Penny Arcade team, and was simply published by WotC. My interpretation of it, however, is as follows: Your spell affects an object, and covers the entire object. That object must have ...


22

Contrary to what you imply in the question, spiritual weapon takes a bonus action to cast (PHB 278), and thus you cannot attack with it as an Action even at the time of casting. About the later attacks we read that: As a bonus action on your turn, you can move the weapon up to 20 feet and repeat the attack against a creature within 5 feet of it The ...


4

Probably not, but ask your DM. The wording of Shape Water states: You choose an area of water that you can see within range and that fits within a 5-foot cube. There's a great deal of gray area here but the clause specifies that the water must be visible. Depending on how saturated the soil is, there may or not be patches of standing water that are ...


15

No The shape water spell description states: You choose an area of water that you can see within range and that fits within a 5-foot cube. It says area of water. Not area of mud, or area that is damp.


3

Any spell of 5th level or lower cast from outside the barrier can't affect creatures or objects within it, even if the spell is cast using a higher level spell slot. Such a spell can target creatures and objects within the barrier, but the spell has no effect on them. Similarly, the area within the barrier is excluded from the areas affected by such spells. ...


0

Let us first look at all of the relevant spell description of Globe of Invulnerability (PHB 245): An immobile, faintly shimmering barrier springs into existence in a 10-foot radius around you and remains for the duration. Any spell of 5th level or lower cast from outside the barrier can't affect creatures or objects within it, even if the spell ...


16

Both Misty Step and Dimension Door work unimpeded Misty Step and Dimension Door, when cast on creature outside the barrier, do not affect or target creatures or objects within the barrier, and they don't affect an area. Furthermore, Globe of Invulnerability does not block vision (required for Misty Step), nor does it prevent targeting of points within it (...


8

Since RAW, spells only do what they say they do, and Globe of Invulnerability does not specify protecting against teleportation or travel via the ethereal plane, it does not protect you against someone teleporting into the Globe. Compare the description of the Globe to that of Forcecage, which specifically deals with this: If the creature tries to use ...


8

Split Ray doesn't have a wait-and-see option The final part of the benefit of feat Split Ray says that "all rays must be aimed at targets within 30 feet of each other and fired simultaneously" (Complete Arcane 83 and emphasis mine). Thus a caster that casts a ray spell modified by the feat Split Ray picks the targets of his rays then launches all the rays ...


2

No; "anything" means "any object". In the absence of special game definitions for terms, D&D 5e reverts to natural language in interpreting the rules. The word "anything" is defined on Dictionary.com as: pronoun any thing whatever; something, no matter what: Do you have anything for a toothache? noun a thing of any kind. ...


4

"Anything" means "any object". In the absence of special game definitions for terms, D&D 5e reverts to natural language in interpreting the rules. The word "anything" is defined on Dictionary.com as: pronoun any thing whatever; something, no matter what: Do you have anything for a toothache? noun a thing of any kind. ...


1

Nystul's Magic Aura says: You place an illusion on a creature or an object you touch so that divination spells reveal false information about it. The target can be a willing creature or an object that isn't being carried or worn by another creature. The key word here is or, you choose a single creature or object that isnt being carried or worn. ...


16

As far as I am aware, there has been no official ruling on this topic, nor is there anything in the written rules governing this, except for 1 possibility, in that specific rules (such as from a spell) override general rules, if such specific rules exist. As shown by the spell Create Bonfire: The bonfire ignites flammable objects in its area that aren't ...


7

The spell needs to target exactly one creature in order for twin to work... ... but there are caveats. As you've noted, the Twinned Spell metamagic option begins its description with: When you cast a spell that targets only one creature... A 2015 errata to the PHB added this note to the description of the Twinned Spell metamagic option: To be ...


16

If you target an object held or worn by a hostile creature, that creature must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw to avoid the spell. The target is an object, the spell cannot be twinned. The fact that a creature can make a saving throw to avoid the effect on the object is irrelevant.


13

The Player's Handbook received errata that added a paragraph to Twinned Spell to clarify this wording (emphasis mine): Twinned Spell (p. 102). A new paragraph appears at the end of this subsection: “To be eligible, a spell must be incapable of targeting more than one creature at the spell’s current level. For example, magic missile and scorching ray aren’...


11

Yes, you add 1d6 from Hunter's Mark The Hunter's Mark spell description states: You choose a creature you can see within range and mystically mark it as your quarry. Until the spell ends, you deal an extra 1d6 damage to the target. Usually, a creature has one AC and one pool of hit points. The Roper is unusual because of its Grasping Tendrils feature: ...


5

You get the bonus damage The bonus damage happens when you hit the creature. The tentacles are part of the creature notwithstanding their own hp pool. You get the bonus damage.


14

There are a few We can start with the most available one: Just attack it. There are no rules against attacking objects that are worn or carried, but you would likely be subject to some DM rulings. Therefore any ability that just lets you make an attack (such as the Attack action) without a target stipulation qualifies. This also includes the attack(s) of ...


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