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80

This answer is rooted deeply in the principles of the specific Old School playstyle that the question is about, and which loosely define the OSR movement. By making mapping a part of play, you can both increase engagement with the mapping, make the time spent mapping less separate and more overlapping with the “interesting” things, and decrease the absolute ...


55

Skip (most of) it Whenever I need to have my PCs travel, I simply skip the travel time and move directly to the point. In the past, I've tried to play through travel time, adding encounters and resource counting, but it's always felt kind of pointless, because the challenges the PCs are facing aren't directly related to the goal. The longer I kept it up, ...


54

About the Rules You are correct that even if you can do something as much as you want, it still takes time to do. Something that takes your action in combat should not be do-able more frequently than once per 6 seconds outside of combat most of the time (there can be some exceptions, but spellcasting would not usually be considered a candidate for that). So ...


47

Yes, you can do this That's how it goes. Spell slots are regained at the end of a long rest, and there's no rule forbidding spellcasting during a long rest. It's effective and somewhat cheesy, but not as broken as it might sound at first. To cast that spell before ending the rest, you need to save up a slot for it. If you intend to do this constantly, you ...


45

To each fall, because D&D doesn't do physics well There is no provision in the rule for multiple falls per turn, so the rule is applied the same to each. The scenario given will (using that optional rule) go as follows: After the first Warlock initiates the chain, it will follow these looping steps: Bob starts a (new) fall from one platform. As per ...


45

Disclaimer This answer was written assuming Encode Thoughts was on the Wizard Spell List. While DNDBeyond lists the spell as a Wizard Spell, the Guildmaster's Guide to Ravnica book doesn't actually specify that the spell has an associated class. If your table accepts DNDBeyond's wisdom that the spell is indeed a Wizard spell, then this answer is valid, but ...


41

When a player is hogging the limelight like this, the way to deal with the situation is to stop encouraging them. The player is getting their fun by having everyone's attention focused on them (see this question for a similar situation). (This isn't a bad thing, by the way! It just means you have to make sure that the rest of the group gets their fun, too.) ...


41

Characters act almost simultaneously Turns are sequential mechanically, but in the game world they are simultaneous. It is like a battle scene in a movie - all combatants act in the same time, but the director shows this as a sequence of actions. However, characters' actions are not 100% simultaneous, since one with better reflexes can act faster that ...


41

You can end concentration at any time (no action required). As it says above, you can end it at any time, no action required. It means you don't need to use a reaction, so you can elect to just end it. Which means yes, you can end your concentration as an enemy approaches so that you drop out of their reach.


40

1. Use the morale system Not all creatures fight to the death. The optional morale system (Dungeon Master's Guide p.273) has opponents roll a DC 10 Wisdom save whenever surprised, reduced to half hit points, unable to harm the PCs at all, their leader is reduced to zero hit points, or half their allies are killed (see DMG p.273 for the exact rules on this). ...


38

You can simply justify it by saying that for mechanical/story reasons, you don't want them to do it. They can come up with the specifics. Ideally, just be up front with it when they build their characters, and they can come up with something. Hi all, for this next campaign we will start with a short introduction story (containing one adventure) and then ...


36

I'm currently running a West Marches style game. I realised before I even began that, if I were to use the standard resting times, I would either have to run an excessive number of random encounters, or have each and every one steam-rolled by a fully-rested party. My solution was quite simple. I changed short rests to 8 hours (and renamed them to simply '...


36

5th Edition Let's look at the main things that "take time" during a turn. Math! Deciding which thing to do. Doing the thing you decided to do. Looking up the rules for the thing you're doing (spells, maybe?). Now, let's compare each point. Math In 3.X, The numbers being thrown around are higher. You can get attack bonus nearly to twenty by 6th level, ...


35

Combat is measured in rounds. A round is 6 seconds. Note that this is not the length of a turn, but the length of a round: everyone’s turns are happening near-simultaneously, with just a slight edge to those who have higher initiative. So there are 10 rounds to a minute, and then of course there are 60 minutes (600 rounds) to an hour, and 24 hours (1,...


35

As Marshall said, you need to find out why John takes so long to choose an action. There are several possible reasons, and each calls for slightly different handling. 1. John is nervous, shy, or otherwise has trouble speaking unless prompted. In this case, the best thing you can do is to have a set of verbal prompts to help him convey his actions quickly. ...


35

Almost definitely nothing. The rest variant you have described, where a short rest is 8 hours and a long rest is 1 week, is exactly as described in in the Dungeon Master's Guide on page 267 in a section on Rest Variants. The designers suggest this option for "gritty realism" and do not provide any warnings about what this might break or imbalance, and ...


35

The record seems to be 209 hours. According to this Reddit post, Reddit user JustOneAmongMany asked Guinness about an alleged 1985/6 record. Guinness responded on September 4, 2018 with this message: Thank you for contacting Guinness World Records. A search of our database shows two Dungeons & Dragons endurance records from that general time ...


35

There are 6 seconds in a round, but... On page 189 and 190 of the 5e Player's Handbook it states: A round represents about 6 seconds in the game world ... you can communicate however you are able, through brief utterances and gestures, as you take your turn The rules are pretty clear; a combat round lasts 6 seconds, and you can't speak very long during ...


31

D&D 5e turns are completely different from AD&D turns, and only share the name. The AD&D meaning of “turn” as being ten rounds* in combat time (or ten minutes in exploration time) last appeared in AD&D 2nd edition, and has been eliminated from editions newer than 1999. In D&D 5e, a turn has the same meaning as it does in a card game or ...


31

Obstacles. I had an encounter light night that forced my players to utilize spells to their advantage. Here's what I ran in order to get them to expend spells in search of an answer. A pool that caused 2d6 burning damage per round you were in it. Player's using ice based spells, or choosing to unleash a fireball and evaporate the water, could eliminate ...


29

The debuff would last 10 rounds. Time section of D&D Basic Rules Chapter 8 (official, online, & free) Basic Rules p.69: A round represents about 6 seconds in the game world. During a round, each participant in a battle takes a turn. 6 seconds for a round, and the round consists of all the turns in that round.


29

Exhaustion for your General Problem If you're concerned about a character exerting themselves for extended periods of time, you may consider requiring Constitution saving throws to prevent exhaustion. For your specific scenario, I could not locate any specific rules associated with extended combat situations, however, swimming for more than 1 hour requires ...


29

There's probably a lot of parts that contribute, but I'll give you a few that I've noticed help a lot: Fewer circumstancial bonuses You don't need to remember a ton of minor bonuses, like getting +2 for flanking and +1 against Goblinoids and +1 from your Feat and -2 from being shaken. Every roll is a basic, set amount and you either roll with Advantage, ...


28

KRyan's answer is excellent, but just in case you're entirely new to RPGs, I should probably clarify something: The real-world hours that you spend playing the game bears little relationship with the time experienced by your character in the fictional world he or she inhabits. As you play the game, the actions you and the other players describe your ...


27

TL;DR Kingdoms in the real world varied in size a great deal. The sizes you get following the guides in the DMG are perfectly reasonable You can (and probably should for the sake of interest) vary them a lot The suggestion in the DMG that their scale matches the size of Great Britain is dependent on switching context from distance to area. A single ...


25

Short Answer No, you need 5 minutes to doff plate armor. You could use illusion or possibly transmutation to create the appearance of armor. To persuade your DM to have easy-off armor you might have to pay a real world or game world cost. Long answer follows.. RAW The RAW say that Heavy Armor takes 5 minutes to doff (PHB 146), so instant doffing not ...


25

Characters can tell time about as well as any normal person... (and about as well as it's interesting for them to know) Barring a a session of video games or something else very interesting, you and I know about what time it is. Sometimes you lose track of time, but it doesn't come up a lot. Granted, I don't know off hand what the exact time the sun rises ...


24

Fiction First Hi Marc. You are running into one of the differences between rules-first systems and fiction-first systems. Fiction-first means that the rules serve the story unfolding between the players: When something happens in the story that matches a trigger condition in the rules, the mechanics engage and the results feed back into the story. Outside ...


24

You seem to be misunderstanding the terms round and turn. PHB, pg.189: The Order of Combat [...] A round represents about 6 seconds in the game world. During a round, each participant in a battle takes a turn. So a round of combat takes about 6 seconds and within that (roughly 6 second) round, every creature takes their turn. What this means in ...


23

All effects with a fixed duration measurable in rounds end just before the beginning of one of your turns. (Otherwise, their duration would be too short to be a full round, or a full 2 rounds, etc.) We can see this by looking at a duration of 1 round, and applying the same logic to the case of 10 rounds. A duration of 1 round, measured in turns, is “each ...


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