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6

Scenario 3 Time stop interrupts the Wizards turn, then his original turn continues after the spell ends. Time stops duration is instantaneous, so it will occur during the wizards action. The spell effect is to allow the Wizard to take addition turns, but when the spell ends he should be able to continue his original turn normally as he would with any other ...


-3

Time Stop only starts after your current turn has ended Whilst my other answer is how I would rule it, and how I believe many other people would rule it, here is what the spell description of Time Stop says: You briefly stop the flow of time for everyone but yourself. No time passes for other creatures, while you take 1d4 + 1 turns in a row, during which ...


0

I would say scenario 2 is correct. There is nothing in the spell’s description that would suggest it ends your turn as soon as you cast it, simply that it uses up your action. I would say you still have the rest of your turn to use up your bonus action, movement, reaction, etc before the turns from Time Stop are used up. So a process would look like this: ...


15

Casting Time Stop #2 whilst Time stop #1 is already in effect will cancel Time Stop #1. So first of all, Time Stop (TS) #1 is cast. Casting TS #2 will cancel TS #1 based on its spell description: You briefly stop the flow of time for everyone but yourself. No time passes for other creatures, while you take 1d4 + 1 turns in a row, during which you can use ...


51

During your action The simplest reading of the spell text, is that you take the extra turns as part of the action which is casting the spell, similar to what you would do if you cast any other instantaneous spell. This means that once you are done taking those turns, you are simply done taking that action and you may continue with the rest of your normal ...


2

My two cents: consider a player whose "answer to everything" is "I smash it with my hands". Does that mean punching is "extremely broken" and should be forcibly limited? Most cantrips don't actually have more power than the other basic actions available to any character. Yes, they are options not available to real-world mortals, but perfectly in tone with ...


9

I would say that the duration counts the time experienced by the subject. That is, if your summoned creature cast time stop itself,1 then the time stop time should count against the summoning’s duration. Likewise, if you cast some buff spell on yourself, and then cast time stop (or cast a buff on yourself during time stop), then the time in the time stop ...


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