33

There are no rules on how long it takes to read a book exactly Nowhere in the rules does it give any kind of guideline for exactly how long it takes to read a book, so that means that it would have to be something that you as the DM would have to decide. However, I think there are rules/mechanics that are even better for what you are asking than a rule for ...


32

The simple answer is that there aren't any right now. The longer answer is that you guys will have to work together as DM and player to figure out what role this creature has in your party, what it can and cannot do in combat and out, and what kind of action expenditure it should require. The closest similar mechanics we have right now are the Ranger's ...


23

You cannot learn spells of another class without actually multi-classing or picking up a feat like Ritual Caster or Magic Initiate. While there is some overlap in class spell lists you can only ever learn the spells of your class unless you make the choice to multi-class or forgo the stat increase to pickup one of the two feats I noted above. Proficiency ...


21

Yes, but... Yes, this does mean that it is possible to gain feats without qualifying for them with levels in a class. But this is not intended to be a loophole to get infinite feats. On the contrary, it should be a rare occurrence, and a reward for pleasing someone powerful by doing something remarkable. As the first part of the Training section you quote ...


21

Yes, but it's not common The rules you're referencing are in a section of the DMG suggesting rewards for characters for DM's looking to go beyond the usual treasure. As such how often they appear in a game, and what form they take, is very much up to the discretion of the DM. If you're interested in something like this you should talk to your DM about it ...


18

Wolf as NPC Accepting you have ruled the fighter’s successful Animal Handling skill check will make the wolf a friendly ally, you now have a four-legged NPC to role-play. Treat it as any other: Image how a character or monster…would react to the adventurers. Consider what it cares about. Does it have any ideals, flaws, or bonds? ... Strive for responses ...


16

This may be fun, and could be cool, but can wreak havoc with balance The game term for a Hydra is "monstrosity" which is a stronger term than "a magical animal." Monstrosity ... frightening creatures that are not ordinary, not truly natural, and almost never benign. (MM p. 7) Balance When you look at how to control or train such a creature, ...


15

The Unearthed Arcana Sidekicks rules allow an NPC to become like a Rogue As Theik points out in their answer, the rules don't really offer any way to do this in the published books which treat NPC/monster stat blocks as immutable after they are created because they aren't really designed to be relevant for long. However, in UA Sidekicks it provides a ...


14

There are no rules in D&D 5e for training an animal companion to use a weapon The ranger's animal companion is meant to be used as-is. If your animal companion is a wolf, then the wolf's stat block will be provided to you by the DM. (I believe the wolf's stat block is at the back of the PHB). Other than what you see on the stat block, there are no other ...


13

Unfortunately, there's only one person who can give you the answers to these questions. All of this is entirely up to your DM, because you're already in pure house-rule territory. By the rules, a Beastmaster Ranger can't have a Dire Wolf as their animal companion. There are also no rules for pups, or training animals. So, rather than asking random strangers ...


13

It is important to understand the fact that even training basic commands to a wild animal is not an easy task, and the adventurers would have to dedicate time every day reinforcing teaching of even basic commands before moving on to the commands that they are looking for. Until the creature is trained, it won't listen to commands, it is unlikely to do what ...


10

Use downtime training rules from Xanathar's Guide to Everything The standard Training downtime option given in the PHB does indeed require a significant time investment - so significant that it's not a practical option in many campaigns. Luckily, however, the Downtime Revisited chapter in Xanathar's Guide to Everything offers alternative rules for training ...


9

This is the kind of thing the DM handwaves away. The rules make it impossible for a creature lacking racial Hit Dice that advances exclusively by level not to have at least 1 level in a class, usually, unfortunately, commoner. Being a level 1 commoner might as well be the same thing as having no combat knowledge; ignoring the orphan's ability scores, the ...


9

As per Adeptus's answer, officially and without optional rules, initial training isn't quantified. Further, while level 0 creatures were a thing in previous editions of Dungeons and Dragons, they usually aren't in Dungeons and Dragons, Third Edition and many of its offspring. A creature without racial Hit Dice has a class level, even of commoner. Below are ...


8

Going strictly by the rules, it takes a character no longer to reach level 1 in a completely new class than it does to gain a level in a currently known class. Each time you have enough experience for a new level, you can choose from any class that you meet the requirements for. (With most DMs, this will happen overnight.) Time taken for a level 1 ...


8

Judging from this question, there are no rules for training animals, so right off the bat you are entering homebrew territory. If your DM is willing, then maybe you could train rats to help you. You can use spells such as Beast Bond and Speak With Animals to try and communicate with them. Talk to them, bribe them, and train them using these spells. (Animal ...


8

If your actual goal is to be a pirate for a while ... ... per your comment under the question ... Seriously? . . . I just want to be a pirate. We don't have the time to take 250 days. In the old days (2e) it was accepted by many that if you gained 1000 xp using the skill, you could become proficient. I haven't seen anything like that. ... then all you ...


8

No, there are no official rules for this You are entirely in homebrew territory now. There are rules in the DM manual for making monsters and calculating their CR, but that's as far as the rules go. You're trying to allow players to turn monsters (NPCs) into other monsters (upgraded NPCs), which is not something the rules support. If you want a Bandit with ...


7

Whether your character can breed rats is a roleplaying question that there aren't really rules for. Even if you've done all the real-world rat-husbandry math, it'll be up to your Dungeon Master to decide how successful your character's efforts are. For your character to have a rad army of fighting rats that follow your commands is a mechanical question, one ...


6

Would speak with animals help with training a mammoth? There are two ways to answer this question: Pragmatic: Yes, being able to actually converse with any animal would obviously help in training them. Rules Based: Speak with Animals says: You gain the ability to comprehend and verbally communicate with beasts for the duration. The knowledge and ...


6

As far as I know—and I’m no expert in 5e but fiend’s answer confirms—there is not currently any official option in 5e for this. But there was in 3.5e: the Lords of Madness sourcebook included the mouthpick magic weapon property that allowed creatures with a bite attack to wield the mouthpick weapon instead of biting. It didn’t grant proficiency with the ...


6

Your question has two parts: How do you tame a wild animal? Realistically, historically, you breed it for dozens of generations by killing the pups that react with fear-aggression and breeding the pups that react with less fear-aggression. If done well, your grandchildren might have an attack dog. But in fantasy, badass dudes train wolves to be their ...


5

After some time and many people asking Crawford about it, he finally gave us his word. And well, it doesn't help much, but now you have something to show your DM. The first twitter is here. Want your D&D character to have a pet/companion? Here’s a little secret: you don’t need special rules for this. Through roleplaying and ability checks (most ...


4

What you should consider is that the wolf remains a more or less wild animal. And as such certain characteristics not change. Wild animals: fear fire; the wolf will have been confronted with fire while being with the goblins but the instinct remains don't know or understand magic and will be distrustful of it. So I'd have the wolf always roll saves vs. ...


4

Find a Druid or Ranger (or someone that acts like one). Wild Empathy A druid can improve the attitude of an animal. This ability functions just like a Diplomacy check made to improve the attitude of a person. A druid can also use this ability to influence a magical beast with an Intelligence score of 1 or 2, but she takes a -4 penalty on the ...


4

While the Player's Handbook skill Handle Animal covers some magical beasts, it doesn't cover the cloud ray; the Epic Level Handbook's skill Handle Animal covers that (albeit poorly) The Player's Handbook on the skill Handle Animal the in the Special entry says You can use this skill on a creature with an Intelligence score of 1 or 2 that is not an animal,...


4

How long would it take for it to be combat ready? A large carnivore such as a tiger or wolf typically takes about two years to become an independent adult. Is there a way to reduce this time? Your group can always reduce the time narratively by saying, "Two years later...." Use the "Between Adventures" rules on page 186 of the Player's Handbook and ...


3

Use the official template Training the horse should add the Warbeast template from Monster Manual II, p219. The template description says, in the "Creating A Warbeast" section: The Monster Manual describes a few "war creatures" that have qualities similar to those of a warbeast but differ from standard creatures of a given kind. These creatures are ...


3

A trained-for-war animal's stat block remains mostly unchanged A heavy horse, light horse, or pony (Monster Manual 273, 273, and 277, respectively) that's trained for the purpose combat riding isn't transformed into a heavy warhorse, light warhorse, or war pony (273–4, 274, and 277–8, respectively). Instead, a heavy horse, light horse, or pony that's ...


3

I believe we are forgetting the direct nod to 'Downtime Activities' that the DMG entry alludes to. DMG pg 231 : "...must spend Downtime with the trainer..." PHB pg 187 Downtime / Training : "...The DM determines how long it takes....Training takes 250 days and costs 1gp per day..." The entry in and of itself kind of contradicts itself. Training ...


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