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241

What's wrong with what he's doing? As far as he can tell, this is a good strategy. He's exceptionally tough, and running through traps has worked for him in the past, so he believes it'll be fine in the future. If you don't want this strategy to work, you'll need to try a different kind of trap. A few options come to mind: more damage different damage ...


78

Disclaimer: this post is largely a distillation of the excellent advice found in AngryGM's post on metagaming.* All quotes are from that post. (Meta-disclaimer: Angry's posts feature excellent advice seasoned with rude and vulgar language.) 0. Your question To answer your question as posed: yes, there are in-game ways to change this behavior, well-covered ...


61

How do the Kobolds remember which parts are trapped? Basically, this answer is about weaving the Kobold's own marking system into the narrative. It does assume you draw your own maps and don't use Dungeon Tiles or anything. Obtain 6 or so pretty looking symbols (they don't need to have meaning, but if they look Draconic it's bonus awesome) Mark every ...


58

One important thing you're missing is that a pit trap is NOT simply a hole in the ground. From the Pathfinder SRD: Pit Trap (CR 1) Pit Trap CR 1 XP 400 Type mechanical; Perception DC 20; Disable Device DC 20 EFFECTS Trigger location; Reset manual Effect 20-ft.-deep pit (2d6 falling damage); DC 20 Reflex avoids; multiple ...


52

As has been said in other posts, traps can do more than just damage. Why are you just running straight damage traps anyways? If he's metagaming, he's gaming you, not the system. Here's a big list of other things traps can do, so you can set him straight: Inflict a condition, such as poison, unconscious, charmed (very funny!), restrained, paralyzed, blind,...


44

When deciding whether to use a roll, ask yourself two questions: Is a task so easy and so free of conflict and stress that there should be no chance of failure? Is a task so inappropriate or impossible- such as hitting the moon with an arrow-that it can't work? If the answer to both of these questions is no, some kind of roll is ...


37

Make traps that aren't about being hidden, but are about avoiding them. The latest dungeon I ran included a trap. All along a hallway, there were massive, purple crystal structures growing from the floor to the ceiling. They were immediately obvious to anyone who wasn't literally blind. There were no rolls required, and there was no time searching for the ...


35

RAW the Rogue does receive the benefits of Expertise to his passive. A passive check is a special kind of ability check that doesn’t involve any die rolls. Such a check can represent the average result for a task done repeatedly, such as searching for secret doors over and over again, or can be used when the DM wants to secretly determine ...


30

So, firstly, water has no effect on sovereign glue. This isn't a bottle of clag paste; this is a legendary magic item. The glue takes 1 minute to set. Once it has done so, the bond it creates can be broken only by the application of universal solvent or oil of etherealness, or with a wish spell. Unless the well is full of universal solvent, it won't ...


29

Spontaneously I see three approaches to this problem, besides talking to him about his character still feeling the pain and that it is not really a good idea to take the damage willingly when there is a way to avoid it. 1. Make the traps hit multiple targets For example a trap in form of a gas leaking and spreading along the whole corridor and affecting ...


29

Strictly speaking, you typically use either Wisdom (Perception) or Intelligence (Investigation) to locate the trap, then a Dexterity check (with thieves' tools) to disable the trap. Asking the player for a further Investigation check to understand a trap that they've already seen is a valid use of the skill, but it's not typical. Normally you simply use ...


28

Many of the rune/glyph type spells, being writing-based, exist for this exact reason. Can you read the manuscript or ancient lettering? Do you care to? Explosive runes and Sepia snake sigil are the classic ones here, but you could easily mod a glyph of warding or symbol to say "when read," etc. to go off. Your average barbarian isn't going to bother to ...


27

This totally depends on how the trap is designed! As the DM, you are the authority to which you should appeal. If you think of it before the thief starts messing with the trap (and therefore not yet indicating to you how they're approaching it and possibly biasing your choice), then you can just decide what kind of trigger this trap has. However, if you ...


27

Setting aside the utility of relegating most passive searching to passive perception and allowing active searching to find a trap that you already have evidence for, most traps and hazards in 4e really don't care about being detected. (This answer is inspired by a now defunct blog post about applying super meat boy to D&D traps (look at the second ...


27

There's no check and therefore no chance of failure. You could search for traps, and miss them, even trigger them while trying to find them. But this spell will always tell you if traps are around or not. Not only that, but you know the nature of the traps. At my table I would give you advantage on the search after the spell. (Granted that's a personal note,...


26

Proficiency with thieves' tools, per optional rules in Xanathar's Xanathar's Guide to Everything has a section on tool proficiencies that details what each tool set contains, a list of skill checks (for specific purposes) that proficiency with that tool grants advantage on, a possible special use of that tool for those who are proficient, and a short list ...


25

You cannot do better than follow the advice in the Angry GM article. In summary: have only one or two types of traps that are detectable by the players. What the article does not address is using traps as battlefield obstacles which is the way armies use "traps" like landmines and barbed wire. These things do not stop enemy armies but they can channel ...


24

There's no need to roll the saving throw immediately. Wait until it has a perceptible effect, then have the player roll retroactively at that point. For example, if they're inside a haunted mansion and an undetected enemy casts a curse on them which prevents them from leaving the mansion, they can wander around inside the mansion all they want and it makes ...


23

Don't make it a trap. Instead, have a bejewelled chamber with a button on the inside. "Do not press." the button reads. Let their curiosity do the rest. Make a prop of the button on the table, and have it be invitingly easy to press. Beyond that, this "hilarious" trap seems mostly tedious. The character's reward for not treating every step like it has ...


23

There is no clear definition of what you need to do to "overcome" a trap in Pathfinder rules, but surviving is probably enough. A search is the SRD brings no useful information: I may be missing something but it seems like Pathfinder just never clearly states this point. However Pathfinder is built from DD3.5 where it is stated (DMG, p39) that: ...


21

Option One: This really isn't a problem. The other players aren't complaining, and so we can see that this is not really that big a deal. Relax, go with the flow, and chuckle along with the group when a 60-pound block of stone drops on his head, the player and stone both freeze briefly, and then the stone splits cleanly down the middle and the fighter ...


21

1) The trap is incredibly obvious. There's no perception check involved; it's part of the description of the room read as soon as you open the door. 2) The trap is incredibly easy to bypass or disable. You can employ or improvise a tower shield to completely negate its effects, or you could just close the door, or you enter the conveniently placed pit-of-...


20

Any character can search for traps, but only someone with the Trapfinding ability can find traps with a DC of higher than 20. Also pertinent is that only characters with the above special ability can disable magic traps with use of the disable device skill.


20

On @Ahriman good answer, I want to add a third method. Split the party, not in space, but in time. When you have separate players, and the knowledge obtained by some can influence the rest, but not so much the other way around, you can make first play the latter, and then the former. In your example, you play first with the buried player. You ask him what ...


20

On a confirmed critical hit the arrow trap deals ×3 damage The arrow trap makes an attack roll against one target by rolling 1d20 and adding to the die roll the arrow trap's attack bonus. Usually, the total is compared to the target's Armor Class (AC), and if the result's equal to higher than the target's AC, the target's dealt 1d8+1 points of damage. ...


20

It depends This is up to the DM and how they have decided to implement how players go about with their investigation checks. Some checks have no chance of triggering a trap and hence don't apply to this situation, but there are a few situations where that might not be the case. For example, if you were to check all the tiles on the floor of a room for a ...


18

Although the clever suggestions so far here are fun and useful, it's important to observe that most low INT/WIS characters have high physical attributes. So my favorite wizard trap is a simple pit trap within an anti-magic aura. Any physical type can climb/jump out easily, but the wizard is stuck. One campaign, I used a deep pit trap. The fighter, rogue, ...


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