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84

I see two primary ways to approach this, depending on the travel. (TL;DR at the end) Travelling through civilized lands From your description, it seems like your players (who are, considering you are playing D&D4e, are basically powerful heroes) are travelling between two cities in a civilized nation. In this case, I'm not even sure if I'd run any kind ...


65

Travel Is Awesome! Focus on the journey, not the destination. Joy is found not in finishing an activity but in doing it. ~Don Williams, Jr. Far from being something to "skip over," wilderness travel is an interesting part of a story and forms a large part of many narratives, from Lord of the Rings to Star Trek. From the 1e Wilderness Survival Guide to ...


55

The only way to do this inconspicuously is to convert all that money into gems. A mundane backpack could easily carry 500,000 gp worth of gems with room left over for camping gear. Upon arrival, gems would be easily converted back to gold pieces one or two at a time, as gems are used as currency (PHB, ch. 5, "Gems, Jewelry, and Art Objects"). This is even ...


44

What the Ranger feature talks about is also mentioned in the Navigate activity from p. 183 in the PHB: Navigate. The character can try to prevent the group from becoming lost, making a Wisdom (Survival) check when the DM calls for it. (The Dungeon Master’s Guide has rules to determine whether the group gets lost.) The mentioned rules are in p. 111 from ...


42

A Portable Hole 10,000 lbs of gold is about a 24-inch cube (0.235 m^3) and a Portable Hole doesn't have a weight limit. Since the interior of a portable hole is 6ft by 10ft, it can easily hold 500,000 gp even if it's not in one convenient cube. The rules for a portable hole say: Folding the cloth closes the hole, and any creatures or Objects within ...


33

3 miles per hour Actions in Combat are not relevant to the travel pace rules. Rogues are faster movers in combat thanks to Cunning Action, but so are most characters as a character's walking speed reflects: Every character and monster has a speed, which is the distance in feet that the character or monster can walk in 1 round. This number assumes short ...


32

Yes, Absolutely. In any circumstance where you're trying to shoo in a sense of urgency and you need to be at the castle to rescue the princess as soon as possible, and you're sure that the princess is actually at said castle after performing divinations or using your information and contacts to confirm her location, fast forwarding keeps the emotions at the ...


32

In D&D 5e, the daily rate of mounted overland travel is generally the same as on foot, because horses get tired and adventurers carry a lot of heavy equipment. That said, some more detailed rules on travel speed are covered under Special Travel Pace (DMG p. 242–243): In 1 hour, you can move a number of miles equal to your speed divided by 10. ...


30

No, you can't use spells that target creatures on vehicles. A vehicle is not a creature.


30

You could do away with the dice rolling and just start a 'random' encounter when you feel like it's a good moment, for example, when they just returned from the goblin lair, exhausted and spent. This can make an encounter that should otherwise be easy suddenly a challenge. Also, it can be easy to forget that a random encounter doesn't necessarily have to ...


28

Waterdeep is approximately 3.8 miles x 1.5 miles Or ~20,000 feet north/south and ~8,000 feet east/west. Both measurements were done along the greatest straight-line dimension of the city. This measurement is done by measuring the space between the walls of Waterdeep, so it includes the enclosed section of the harbor to the south. This was derived from the ...


27

(GM here) No, you may not cast Pass Without a Trace on a sandship that is not specifically outfitting for stealthy movement. Especially since stealth sand ships exist. The Ranger (not OP) asked two questions: 1. Can she use her ranger ability to get the party through difficult terrain (she has desert as favored terrain) with the boat to hide their tracks ...


27

TL;DR Kingdoms in the real world varied in size a great deal. The sizes you get following the guides in the DMG are perfectly reasonable You can (and probably should for the sake of interest) vary them a lot The suggestion in the DMG that their scale matches the size of Great Britain is dependent on switching context from distance to area. A single ...


25

Travel is ended by entering combat or any other sort of tactical movement (Where a character's speed is used) "Travel" Refers to the movement mechanics described on page 181 of the PHB. At the start of Chapter 8: Adventuring, the PHB defines the rules for traveling and movement in scales of days, hours and minutes. Here, you can also find the Travel Pace ...


25

There's actually a good way to "move" the gold to the Monastery. It doesn't involve carrying it yourself, though. The spell Teleport, in addition to its normal use of moving creatures, can also target objects. It targets an object that fits entirely in a 10-foot cube, so if you fill a crate with gold coins you should be able to teleport it in one or two ...


24

Make the time spent matter. Players can afford to send their characters trekking through the woods because in most games the PCs are in a vacuum. By that I mean that the world only moves when the players are looking at it. If the PCs are sent into a dungeon, nothing happens in town until the PCs return. Don't do that. Turn time into a commodity. If ...


23

The Druid is probably your best bet. There are two spells in 5e that nourish creatures: Create Food and Water, and Goodberry. Create Food and Water is a 3rd level spell and feeds 15 humanoids, and Goodberry is 1st level and creates enough food to nourish 10 humanoids. If your goal is keeping the largest number of travelers alive, Goodberry is your best bet. ...


21

Extract the first few plot points that are going to take place at the destination and put them on the road. This strategy also helps you be less railroad-y because the players are out in the open and have more choices about where to go instead of being locked into a city/dungeon/what-have-you.


20

Description, description, description. Give them a thirty second to three minute description of the travels. Skip the rolls (unless you want one to determine how long it took, etc) and just talk through it. It takes almost no time, but gives the players the impression time has passed.


20

According to the traditional summoner's eidolon class feature, this isn't a problem unless the GM says it is... The traditional Pathfinder summoner's eidolon class feature says that A summoner begins play with the ability to summon to his side a powerful outsider called an eidolon. The eidolon forms a link with the summoner, who, forever after, summons ...


20

The guides do not necessarily interact, mechanically, with the navigation checks described in "The Land of Chult." But there are two ways that they do/can interact with navigating, generally, the jungle: They may have a better Wisdom (Survival) modifier than all of your party members. In that case this GM finds it completely reasonable to let the guide do ...


19

Time Spent Traveling First of all, there are rules for overland movement that tell you how long it takes to move from place to place on a journey. This will tell you how long the travel takes, and should be accounted for in terms of events in the world and so on. Describing the Journey Prioritizing your game time, keeping decisions important and ...


18

You ask, what is the cruising speed of a dragon? All dragons older than wyrmlings fly at 80ft. That works out to about 9 mph. If they dash, they can get to about 18 mph. The DMG gives very specific daily travel distances for flying on griffons, which have the same flying speed as dragons (p. 119). Flying by spell or magic item works the same as ...


17

You can reach 1195 miles in 8 hours (150 mph) with the following technique: The Party Kobolds are selected since they weigh only 25 lbs Barry is a Kobold Barbarian 6 for these features: Path of the Totem Warrior Aspect of the Beast: Elk Warforsh is a guild of 6 Kobold Monks 10/Druids 2 for these features: Mobile feat Unarmored Movement (Level 10) Wild ...


17

One way to do this mechanically is via the Help action From "working together" in the Basic Rules (p. 59) you can apply advantage without resorting to anything "custom" to the adventure. Working Together The character who’s leading the effort—or the one with the highest ability modifier—can make an ability check with advantage, reflecting the help ...


17

PHB Ranger: on the favored terrain and traveling for 1+ hours, the party's movement is not slowed Choose one type of favored terrain: arctic, coast, desert, forest, grassland, mountain, swamp, or the Underdark. [...] While traveling for an hour or more in your favored terrain, you gain the following benefits: Difficult terrain doesn’t slow ...


17

Generally speaking, Encumbrance rules do not apply in overland travel. There are rules for faster and slower travel overland, but they aren't affected by how much weight an individual character is carrying—because they aren't affected by a character's movement speed at all. For example, it's not uncommon to have a party who, through various means, has lots ...


16

320+ miles with Wind Walk. Possibly a little more if you were really, really dedicated. (Assuming you aren't going for a Peasant Railgun-style hunk of cheese here) This 6th level spell gives a cluster of characters a 300' flight speed for 8 hours, no Concentration. Looking at the DMG, page 242, we see that you can convert a character's Speed to how fast ...


16

There are rules for jungles The Dungeon Master's Guide has all kinds of rules that can be adapted for jungles. Hot temperatures (p. 110), quicksand (p. 110), diseases (p. 256-257), all these things function perfectly in a jungle. However, the main focus of the published D&D adventures tends to be the Sword Coast, which is scarce on jungles. If you want ...


15

You don't have to spend much time at all in order to make travel matter. Two major ways: Yes, use the random monsters. They represent a pressure that means the PCs must always consider the danger of the places they travel through, and prepare for it (or not, and occasionally suffer for it). They can also be springboards for new, unplanned adventures, which ...


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