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1

House rules There are a lot of great solutions to this problem that can be minimally disruptive to the flow of an average D&D campaign, because this is the sort of thing that players generally resolve 'off-screen' or by invoking some of the fuzzier or more abstract systems that are less concerned with 'balance,' and more with reinforcing some overall ...


5

Change the pacing and narrative of your campaign with Gritty Realism variant rules. Whenever you consider changing the narrative of a campaign to emphasis survival as a non-trivial part of the adventuring day (DMG 84) you should consider the Resting Variant rules (DMG 267), specifically Gritty Realism: This variant uses a short rest of 8 hours and a long ...


5

Blatantly stealing from Zee Bashew Zee Bashew actually has made a small video on how he tweaked the Goodberry spell, in order to enhance the immersiveness of his survival adventure. I definitely recommend this video! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkHapG6kXUg A very simple house ruling that won't disturb the spell effect One very simple approach, is to ...


1

Talking for a friend, he just told me "reduce the effect". From a setting-perspective it's coherent, since the resources are scarce, so reducing the effect of spells and abilities that get food/water by a d4 or by 1/2 from the start would not be absurd. But i'm afraid this could put the players in a "i must optimize to get more resources" mentality. Also, ...


1

If all else fails, house-rule it This is your world as GM; you are free to state, "spells that provide sustenance do not exist in this universe"... and thus it is so. You're welcome to even keep certain spells that provide multiple benefits (such as the 1HP gain from Goodberry), but just rule that any spell provisions that provide nourishment or sustenance ...


3

Resource management is important, but there are a few ways to moderate this. If its just a hike through the wilderness, then sure, spells to keep supplies in good order make travel easier, as it should. This is the strength of druids and rangers and to pass off this dims any spotlight on those class features. To present they players with the hardship of ...


16

Goodberry and related spells do trivialise survival As far as "roll-playing" goes, some aspects of survival are almost a given with the right spells. What you and your players need to remember is that this is actually a roleplaying game, and play the roles appropriately. Real life example - when the initial elements of INTERFET deployed to East Timor, ...


44

Hard core resting rules A short rest is 8 hours and a long rest is anything from 24 hours to a week in a safe place with access to food and water. That makes hit dice, and even lower level slots much more valuable. This way you aren't technically nerfing classes and they can use some of those powers today and maybe tomorrow, but the next long rest could be ...


12

Simple answer: Ban them from providing nourishment. Goodberry does two things. It restores 1 HP, which isn't very useful unless you are at 0 HP. It provides nourishment for 1 day. While there are still good reasons to prepare or use Goodberry, if you make a change that prevents it from providing nourishment, its value is greatly diminished. Difficult ...


32

Out of the box, as written, there isn't much to do to turn Dungeons and Dragons (5th edition) into a Wilderness Survival game; it's simply not the target playstyle. These are mundane problems in a magical world full of Batmans (or at least Robins) Gandalfs, and Rataghasts. These are people that know how to get water and forage and hunt, or simply conjure ...


6

Irrelevant; no. Easy; yes Unless "You all die of starvation" is the campaign ending you are looking for. D&D is a resource management game - encounters drain resources (hp, spell slots etc.) and rests replenish them. All wilderness travel does is add a resource tax, either in the form of the spell slots needed to cast the spells you are overly worried ...


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