36

It's up to the DM. Having said that, D&D pricing doesn't make economic sense, so the answer I prefer1 when I DM is that is you get 500gp worth of dust out of 500gp worth of rubies. The game also doesn't specify any other properties than value when it talks about most gems. Maybe the price is exactly proportional to weight, i.e. a 500gp ruby is equal in ...


30

Pricing in DnD is largely just a mechanic to restrict access The 500gp is the barrier, not the mechanics by which the item is gained. Either the item is given as a reward for a task done and worth 500gp or the item is bought with 500gp worth of gold earned. Either way the DM has a method by which to reward the characters with something which opens up more ...


24

The question seems to boil down to the ability to mend a crushed gem. The Instant Summons spell is not relevant to what you're ultimately asking. Mending states: "... repairs a single break or tear in an object ..." The examples are equally clear and simple. Crushing is not a single break or tear in an object. If you went with an interpretation ...


21

I've noticed a couple of very small ways this approach influences the game, but they haven't been very significant. Your mileage may vary I've played out both the "stuff is stuff, and if you want money you have to sell it" and "stuff is just money, so selling it is just fluff". I have picked up on a couple of changes that the latter ...


16

Handling of the treasure is generally left to the players Tables vary and as Thomas Markov said, you can directly ask your players how they want to handle treasure. But the way I handle it, and I believe this is one of the more common methods, is that the players simply decide among themselves, especially if you are determining the contents of the treasure ...


15

There are several spells that use rubies, generally by crushing them. Continual flame uses 50GP of ruby dust. See Basic Rules, pg. 227 A flame, equivalent in brightness to a torch, springs forth from an object that you touch. The effect looks like a regular flame, but it creates no heat and doesn't use oxygen. A continual flame can be covered or hidden but ...


14

In addition to the other answers, a fantasy ruby has the same mundane uses as real ruby; bling. If you turn up to the king's party without fancy jewellery you will stick out like a peasant, maybe even mistaken for the help! Roleplay opportunity is often missed in favour of 'what do the rules say'. As an example my kobold once found 500 x 10gp gems and a wolf ...


13

It sounds like you have a collaborative campaign and it is working well with simplifying wealth into gold pieces (gp). My players and I myself have used this method in particular with copper and silver before, too. Yet, many carried a few copper pieces and silver pieces with them still "just in case". Thematically, my players in the past have ...


11

In addition to existing answers, there are spells that require gems or crystals in general, and ruby is both. Here is the list of the spells I found from Basic Rules: Teleportation Circle - Rare chalks and inks infused with gems 50gp Contingency Carved ivory and gem crusted Statuette of yourself 1500gp Heroes’ Feast Gem-encrusted bowl 1000gp Magic Jar Gem, ...


11

I assume that by "gold requirement" you mean a material component with a specific cost. I have been told that regardless if the spell has a gold requirement, that your focus cant replace the gold as a component. Is this true? Yes, that is true. PHB states: A character can use a component pouch or a spellcasting focus ... in place of the ...


9

Ask your players how they want to handle treasure. Your question here, the question you have in bold: So how can I design/present an asymmetrical magic item hoard in a way that leaves all four players feeling rewarded? This is essentially the exact question I like to ask my players during a Session 0. How do you guys want to handle treasure and magic items?...


9

Unless your GM rules otherwise, you can use a real world analogy to crushed ruby, diamond powder. Diamond powder of an appropriate grain size (around 50 microns) burns with a shower of sparks after ignition from a flame. Consequently, pyrotechnic compositions based on synthetic diamond powder can be prepared. If you do want some effect from crushing gems ...


6

While the various lycanthropy curses are not explicitly given a level, using the level of the creature that inflicts them (such as level 3 for Curse of the Werewolf) should be a good stand in. For counteracting the curse, use the curse’s DC (since the curse is treated as an affliction), and half rounded up of the aforementioned creature level* as the ...


6

It would depend on the nature of your game. I would find this approach unenjoyable for several reasons. I find the nature of treasure to be interesting. I like that my character doesn't just have a tally of gold, but has some coins, some gems of various kinds, several fine bearskins, a good (but not great) painting of the king, ... As a player and as a DM, ...


5

The section "The Crime Scene" states (emphasis mine): My commentary, in spoiler block: Where is the Maguffin? We see previously in the section "Zhents Caught in the Act":


5

There are several spells that require ruby dust as material components: Continual Flame (50 gp) Forbiddance (1000 gp) Force Cage (1500 gp) Imprisonment (500 gp per HD of the target) Sequester (powder composed of diamond, emerald, sapphire and ruby dust worthing at least 5000 gp) Simulacrum (1500 gp) Your ruby allows 10 casts of Continual flame or it allows ...


5

Don't fret about it. There isn't one universal answer to this, but it isn't really necessary to balance treasure on a character-by-character basis. Here are a few core concepts from my experience as a DM: Different players are motivated by different things. Some players really need the shiny items to feel cool, others don't. Don't get me wrong; almost every ...


4

Probably not an issue when converting between types of coin, provided you preserve value. In short, all the parties I have every played as part of or run games for prefer to do what I jokingly call the ‘magic coin purse’ approach. In this setup, it’s assumed that platinum, gold, silver, and copper are freely interchangeable without any issues, and players ...


3

The volume of 1000 coins and their container Volume of coins Let's start with the basics of naming things: Coins are cylinders of diameter \$D\$ and height \$h\$. A stack of \$n\$ coins has a height of \$H=n\times h\$. Each coin has a volume of $$V_1=\pi \frac {D^2}{4}\times h$$ We can separate that into stacks, but the total volume will be \$V_{1000}=1000\...


3

The best guide I know of is to use the treasure tables in the DMG (5e, chapter 7, pages 136-139). However, its helpful to know how many times you should be rolling on the tables. For Treasure Hoards, I try to keep pretty close to this: "You can give out as much or as little treasure as you want. Over the course of a typical campaign, a party finds ...


3

The paper booklet Contacts & Adventurers from the SR4 GM-screen (Product number 26002) contains several ready-made run ideas. In some cases, the Johnson doesn't make it to the exchange, these are marked with an *. The planned and backed up payments by the Johnson once everything is done in them are: Assassination 1: 5k base offer, 2k bonus. Can be ...


3

The treasure generation can be found at least in the fifth edition rulebook, section 3.2. The fourth edition also seems to have treasure generation tables. Such tables do not exist in the first edition.


3

Good treasure is not limited to magic items. If you don't want to give them magic items, give them personalized unique non-magic gear. A cleric might get just as much if not more fun from a set of armor made with their gods holy emblem and color scheme, maybe they find a map to a defunct temple to their god they can try to redeem, or maybe they move up the ...


2

As other answerers have said in more detail, mending only repairs a single break/tear in the target object, making repairing the sapphire by that means questionable. That said, I wanted to comment on the following: [...], or would the price be less because it lost the ability to be used as a component in Drawmij's Instant summons? I actually don't think it ...


2

There are no mechanics for mending crushed gems, so it’s completely up to the DM. There are just no mechanics for mending crushed gems. There is nothing to tell us if the damage is compatible with the mending spell either. Is it “crushed” into two pieces or a gazillion pieces? So the DM decides if it can be done, and if so, how it can be done, be it with ...


1

Yet another alternative to the other answers, and one you touched on in your question - selling it for gold. So the entire necklace is worth 750 gold, and the ruby alone is worth 500 gold. The ruby weighs very little (let's be nice and say it weight around the same as a single gold piece) - so in rough numbers the ruby is worth 500x it's weight in gold (...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible