66

Your players are right. An unconscious character can consume a potion administered by another player. This is held up by this sage advice entry, by Jeremy Crawford, a 5e designer. Imathil Half-Elven ‏@imathil @JeremyECrawford Can potions be administered to unconscious characters as an action? Aspirating being the issue. 10:01 PM - 18 Aug 2015 ...


64

The character can spend HD after an hour. (Now confirmed by Jeremy Crawford; as always, take twitter with a grain of salt.) Just read the "Resting" rules. A short rest is a period of downtime, at least 1 hour long, during which a character does nothing more strenuous than eating, drinking, reading, and tending to wounds. (PHB p.186, "Short Rest") We ...


53

No. From the Polymorph spell description: This spell can't affect a target that has 0 hit points. Of note: this caveat was added in the Player's Handbook Errata, as pointed out by Thyzer, after the original printing. Some PHBs may not contain this text, but it nonetheless is the intended rules. Other spells with polymorphing effects don't work either: ...


46

Since the goblin is sleeping, you could rule that the rogue surprises the goblin and gets a free round of actions before the goblin can react. In this case initiative is rolled as usual, but only the rogue gets to act on the first round (so if the goblin wins initiative, it still gets to act only after the rogue completes their turn). Even if you don't rule ...


43

No, as far as the rules are concerned, being knocked out does not affect whether you gain experience. The DMG has this to say about experience on page 260: Each monster has an XP value based on its challenge rating. When adventurers defeat one or more monsters-typically by killing, routing, or capturing them-they divide the total XP value of the monsters ...


42

Yes. RAW, Evasion means a character only takes half damage, even when unconscious. The relevant part of Evasion text, that you've quoted says: When you are subjected to an effect that allows you to make a Dexterity saving throw to take only half damage, you instead take no damage if you succeed on the saving throw, and only half damage if you fail. (SRD ...


39

Don't get knocked unconscious While this is not the answer you're looking for, it's about the best one we can give. An unconscious character can, by the plain English definition of the word, not act. Both in the reality of the game world as well as the rules, that not bleeding out is the only thing your character can do. If your character keeps getting ...


37

Yes, unconscious creatures still roll saving throws. "Automatically fails Strength and Dexterity saving throws" implies that other saving throws do not automatically fail. The phrasing would be different if they intended all saves to automatically fail. PHB p.179 states "A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a ...


37

A fireball or a similar AoE spell would not crit The Unconscious condition does state that (from the SRD p. 359, emphasis mine): Any attack that hits the creature is a critical hit if the attacker is within 5 feet of the creature. An "attack" is a well-defined term in the 5e rules that is different from the basic English meaning of what an attack is. ...


37

This is an exception to the general rule, the PC takes one death save failure. You've accurately quoted the relevant general rules. RAW two death save failures would normally be taken by a PC from an attacker within 5 feet while that PC is unconscious (as correctly reasoned in the question). So, if no one successfully intervenes before the PC's next turn (...


35

Sorry, but No The Key Word here is Attack. Attacks as defined in the PHB are D20 rolls against AC. From PHB, 194 If there’s ever any question whether something you’re doing counts as an attack, the rule is simple: if you’re making an attack roll, you’re making an attack. Critical Hits are defined on page 194 (emphasis mine), If the d20 roll for an ...


33

The rules that you've quoted are pretty clear. You gain advantage when attacking unconscious creatures, and you gain disadvantage when attacking prone creatures from further than 5 feet away. If you have both advantage and disadvantage — you're attacking an unconscious creature from further than 5 feet away — you get neither, instead.


33

The entry for Death Saving Throw says: Whenever you start your turn with 0 hit points.... So this just means that you make the throw at the beginning of your turn. However, nowhere in the description does it say that it requires any kind of action to make the save. A saving throw is an instant response to a harmful effect and is almost never done by ...


32

This spell sends creatures into a magical slumber. Roll 5d8; the total is how many hit points of creatures this spell can affect. Creatures within 20 feet of a point you choose within range are affected in ascending order of their current hit points (ignoring unconscious creatures). Starting with the creature that has the lowest current hit points, each ...


32

I guess this question has been answered previously via Twitter by Jeremy Crawford. Can you take a unconscious target with you using dimension door? @JeremyCrawford: Only a willing creature can travel with you via dimension door. You can't give consent when you're unconscious.


32

Yes. This is implied by the rules on death saving throws (PHB p.197), which state in part (emphasis added): If you take any damage while you have 0 hit points, you suffer a death saving throw failure. Note that damage while you are at 0 hit points doesn't reduce your hit points, though: A creature's current hit points (usually just called hit points) ...


31

Nothing. There is no current rule that spell effects end when a caster is unconscious or dies unless they are specifically concentration spells. Thus, since Find Familiar is not a concentration spell, it's perfectly reasonable to assume that the familiar stays and is unaffected by the fact that his wizard is unconscious (or dead). And in fact, the ...


30

You are definitely Poisoned As PJRZ pointed out, failing the saving throw by 5 or more is an example of failing the saving throw. As such, you will both be unconscious (because you failed the save by more than 5), and poisoned (because you failed the saving throw at all). It is very reasonable for you to ask why some other game features would include the ...


30

Optional rule: Lingering Injury There are no rules in the PHB limiting how often a PC can get up after being knocked to 0 HP. For DMs who don't like there being few consequences for dropping to 0 HP, in the DMG on page 272 there is an optional rule for lingering injuries that covers any PC who: Receives a critical hit Drops to 0 HP but is not killed out ...


29

You can't treat the time you spend unconscious as a short rest. Short Rest A short rest is a period of downtime, at least 1 hour long, during which a character does nothing more strenuous than eating, drinking, reading, and tending to wounds. There's a big difference between that and an hour spent unconscious because you almost died. I suspect that ...


28

The answer to this is the combination of a few different rules, most which are found in the Player's Handbook ("PHB"), with a few extra notes found on page 77 of Xanathar's Guide to Everything ("XGE"), because these sort of questions did come up after the initial rules release. First off, XGE makes its clear that when you're asleep, you have the unconscious ...


27

The sorcerer's death saving throw can use Tides of Chaos. That's because it's not the character who is acting, it's the player. It's not explicitly spelled out, but there's a chain of reasoning that gets us there: In class descriptions, "you" sometimes refers to players, sometimes to characters. This is patently clear from reading almost any paragraph in ...


26

In my PHB the full suffocation rule is (emphasis mine): A creature can hold its breath for a number of minutes equal to 1 + its Constitution modifier (minimum of 30 seconds). When a creature runs out of breath or is choking, it can survive for a number of rounds equal to its Constitution modifier (minimum 1 round). At the start of its next turn,...


26

By RAW, maybe not - by RAI, you most certainly can A very strict RAW reading would conclude that in order to gain the benefit of a goodberry, the consuming character must be able to use their action to consume it. However, as it happens, this question has been asked of Jeremy Crawford (whose comments/tweets are considered official rules clarification) and ...


25

Temporary Hit Points do not make you Conscious. Rules Compendium p. 258 on Temporary Hit Points indicate that: Not Real Hit Points: Temporary hit points aren’t healing, but rather a layer of “insulation” that attacks have to get through before they start dealing real damage to a target. Don’t add temporary hit points to a creature’s current hit points (...


25

This house rule will almost certainly change the balance of your game -- by making it more lethal -- but whether it will "unbalance" your game is for you and your players to decide together. Imposing save-versus-exhaustion rolls when PCs regain consciousness after dropping in combat creates a nontrivial risk of a so-called "death spiral." Once your players ...


25

Not-Unconscious does not necessarily mean awake and aware. Sometimes the game just expects us to understand certain terms without giving explicit rules text about what they mean. Famously, 5e doesn't specify a 'dead' condition or give any rules about what it means to be dead. So there is a precedent for the game having certain game concepts left to the ...


24

From DMG p.139, "Most potions consist of one ounce of liquid." Just to clarify the amount of liquid we are dealing with here. From PHB p.197, "If damage reduces you to 0 hit points and does not kill you, you fall unconscious (see Appendix A). This unconsciousness ends if you regain any hit points." The most obvious answer to this would just be "Rule of Fun"...


24

There's room for a DM to rule both yes and no The rule for unconscious says: can't move or speak, and is unaware of its surroundings It is interesting to note that it does NOT say: can't move, speak, or hear. There is no definition of "surroundings" in the game but a plain English understanding would be something along the lines of "all the stuff (...


22

Yes, using Tides of Chaos is legitimate in this situation, at least until we get official errata that states otherwise (I could not find any). While you generally can't do "anything" whilst at zero hit points, you're still clinging on to (what may be your last moments of) life; you can still use your wild magic to tip the scales in your favor. Tides of ...


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