457

I am a huge dumb nerd so I just went and proved this for myself with a bathtub and a bottle of Red Guitar. By pulling the cork with my teeth and immediately folding my thumb over the lips of the bottle, I managed to leak only the merest iota of wine. If I had the clearance to stand upright instead of kneeling there, like a moron, dunking my head and holding ...


76

After reading Eikre's answer, I thought, sure you can.. but what about swimming? and since I live near the beach.. So, The Answer is "with extreme difficulty" if the water is moving. Having to keep an arm free to maintain position and not get drawn to the surface or swept along with the undercurrent, does require the DEX check, determined by the waters ...


62

My tables: the characters know the underwater combat rules just as well as the players. My interpretation--and this is just one man's thinking--is that anything in the PHB should be considered fair game for character knowledge. It's been my interpretation for decades, and has worked out well at plenty of tables. The fundamental process is "GM narrates ...


55

Unless there are some secret rules written away in the DMG or PHB that details how water affects magical and elemental occurrences, the fireball should occur normally. I think earlier editions had rules where lightning would spread out in an AOE (area of effect), but as far as I know that doesn't exist in 5e. This isn't to say fire would spread in a larger ...


49

The fifth level evocation Immolation from the Elemental Evil Player's Companion wreathes a creature in flames. These magical flames can’t be extinguished through nonmagical means. Since water is non-magical, an Immolated target should burn quite nicely underwater. (For up to 1 minute, if you concentrate, and they fail their save.)


46

This question ultimately boils down to this: Can the Tarrasque (even if it has Regeneration) drown? Yes* *: Assuming absolutely everything goes precisely as you expect it to. From the Basic Rules...here's how Suffocation (i.e. Drowning, in this case) works. A creature can hold its breath for a number of minutes equal to 1 + its Constitution modifier (...


44

The rues of D&D are simple: The DM describes the environment The players describe what they want to do The DM narrates the result of the character's actions So: "You are underwater" "I want to drink a potion" This is where you're getting stuck Well, I'm hypothesising that the reason you have a problem is that, on the face of it, you think the player'...


41

The common magic item, candle of the deep (XGE 136), may be what you are looking for. The flame of this candle is not extinguished when immersed in water. It gives off light and heat like a regular candle. Although this is just a candle, it gives an indication for how powerful WotC think an item with similar properties may be; namely, not at all (...


40

Yes, it is possible (depending on your circumstances and DM) Nothing in the rules prevents this There is nothing in the rules for resting that prescribes the environment that you can rest in. There are only certain things that interrupt rest according to the rules: If the rest is interrupted by a period of strenuous activity - at least 1 hour of walking, ...


39

Swimming is not flying As far as I am aware, flying is never defined as a game term, which means the word takes its normal English meaning: moving through the air under one's own power. I don't think most people would describe underwater movement as flying (except metaphorically). You can probably "fly" at half speed underwater The rules for swimming ...


39

Just as in the 3.5e version of this question, in 5e we have the situation where being in water has no special effect on electricity spells. Why not? Because being in water only affects natural electricity because that electricity follows the path of least resistance, which being in water rather than air affects. How it affects the path of least resistance is ...


30

The second level cleric, wizard, and artificer spell continual flame produces a flame which can be covered or hidden but not smothered or quenched. Since water puts out fire by quenching it, a continual flame can burn underwater.


27

There are no core rules for falling or diving into water Right now, this is an area the rules don't touch on at all. It is left completely to the DM. The only rules listed in any of the rule books for falling in any medium is the basic rule in the PHB and the optional rules for flying creatures and falling from great heights in XGE. Other than that, nothing ...


26

Probably not? D&D 5e breaks from the tradition of several more recent editions of D&D by allowing - indeed, encouraging - DMs to make their own rulings on situations rather than following a single explicit canon in regards to the rules. It also - particularly in regards to spells - attempts to be descriptive (of the general effects and feeling of ...


26

No, they can't Verbal components (PHB, 203) for spellcasting as described as: Most spells require the chanting of mystic words. The words themselves aren’t the source of the spell’s power; rather, the particular combination of sounds, with specific pitch and resonance, sets the threads of magic in motion. Thus, a character who is gagged or in an area of ...


26

It's possible, but requires a lot of unlikely events. It definitely can drown There is nothing in the stat block that states the Tarrasque can breathe underwater, so it can't. If it can be put in water deep enough that it can't get out in time before suffocation, then it will drown. In addition, the 5e stat block also does not include regeneration as an ...


26

No There are examples of magic items that do grant as swimming speed, and they state so explicitly. The Cloak of the Manta Ray (DMG pg. 159), for example, states that "you have a swimming speed of 60 feet." Since the Gloves do not do so, they do not grant a swimming speed. They do exactly what they say they do: remove the speed penalty from being ...


25

There are 5 main differences. Movement You spend twice your movement to swim, unless you have a swimming speed. Difficult terrain triples the movement you spend instead. While swimming, each foot of movement costs 1 extra foot (2 extra feet in difficult terrain), unless a creature has a swimming speed. Source here. Weapon Combat Usable underwater melee ...


24

A spell only does what it says in the description None of the spells you list, nor any spell you can cast, would be affected by being underwater except for the resistance creatures acquire against fire. Creatures and Objects that are fully immersed in water have resistance to fire damage. You can narrate this by justifying some magical force holding the ...


23

Lesser restoration can't cure drowning You can see the full list of conditions, in the basic rules. Drowning is not included in this list and thus is not a condition. However, even if drowning was a condition, lesser restoration still wouldn't help you. It does not heal all conditions, just a specific subset of conditions: You touch a creature and can end ...


22

Lightning damaging spells do not behave differently in water The various lightning spells you mention, shocking grasp, call lightning and chain lightning, none of them mention interacting with water in any way, so they don't. Spells only do what they say they do, although a DM is free to rule otherwise (also see the end of the quote at end of my answer). The ...


20

Produce Flame does what it says it does — it sits in your hand and produces light, or you can throw it to do damage, ending the spell. Being underwater does what it says — if the creature you throw the flame at is fully immersed, they have resistance to the damage. The flame is magic — it isn't something reacting with oxygen.


20

Luring Song has as part of its description: A creature can also repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns. So the player gets to roll a new save every round, and success will render it immune to the song of that Harpy. They'll still need to pass all the 8 saving throws eventually, but between the low DC and being able to pass multiple per ...


20

Commission the item now, and it'll be done just in time The armor augment crystal greater crystal of aquatic action (Magic Item Compendium 25) (3,000 gp; 0 lbs.) does what's needed and much, much more: it negates armor check penalties on Swim checks, grants a swim speed, and the bearer suffers no movement or combat penalties underwater in a way that's ...


19

About ranged attacks Ranged weapons have a normal range and a long range. Under normal circumstances, you can attack enemies which are within your long range, but as soon as they are beyond normal range you have disadvantage on the attack. Attacking a creature while engaged in close combat does also impose disadvantage on ranged attacks. (PHB p.195) ...


19

Yes, if you don't use your swim speed then your movement is penalized Swim Speed is not a generic rule that allows you to use your standard movement speed for Swimming, it's a specific movement rate when Swimming. All creatures that have a Swim Speed have one listed at a specific value. It's not a generic ability that enables them to use their standard speed ...


19

Your title asks: What happens if an ocean is zapped by the witch bolt spell? The ocean is not a legitimate target. The target must be a creature, per the description of the witch bolt spell (PHB, p. 289; emphasis mine): A beam of crackling, blue energy lances out toward a creature within range, forming a sustained arc of lightning between you and the ...


18

Nothing, unless you choose to swim to the surface. The description of the Ring of Water Walking states: While wearing this ring, you can stand on and move across any liquid surface as if it were solid ground. It simply gives you the ability to walk on the surface of water as if it were solid ground. It doesn't force you to do anything, and doesn't force ...


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