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122

Consider that "sudden, undeserved wealth" is a fantastic story hook. The party is now famous. Against all odds they defeated the dragon and spent its treasure with abandon at all the best shops in town. The tale is going to spread of a band of adventurers and their dragon's hoard. Bards are going to sing about it in taverns far and wide. This kind of thing ...


77

Stop dealing with the 98% of the population. If they're so rich, they are now peers of the 2% of the population who rule in various ways. Peasants may have little to offer in reward (perhaps fealty?), but queens, nobles, generals, and the heads of merchant empires will want to either control or ally with such powerful figures – before their rivals do. As a ...


69

So, your first mistake was allowing the players to go to Fantasy Costco and freely spend their wealth on magic items. Magical items aren't purchasable by default; the only things players can buy are what you say they can buy. The Dungeon Master's Guide discusses this on p.135. But it's done, so what can you do to fix it? 1. They might be cheating (...


41

Starting Equipment at higher levels Page 38 of the DMG provides a table for starting wealth and equipment at various levels.


34

It means that if you are creating a Ranger or Bard, if you choose not to take the standard equipment packages from your Class and Background, you instead roll five four-sided dice (5d4), add them together, then multiply the result by 10 to determine the number of gold pieces you start with, which you then use to buy your equipment during character creation. ...


29

As BESW said, don't expect the game system to model reality. That said, if you need to figure out stats for potato tea... It's an ingested poison. As the SRD says, Ingested poisons are virtually impossible to utilize in a combat situation. A poisoner could administer a potion to an unconscious creature or attempt to dupe someone into drinking or eating ...


27

"Wealth" does not mean just "cash on hand". A character's wealth is the cost to purchase all of their equipment (minus non-magical gear they started with or could have started with) plus their cash on hand. A level 2 character is expected to have about 1000gp worth of stuff; they would only have 1000gp in cash if they're saving it all up for something ...


26

There is a table is on page 38 of the Dungeon Master's Guide. However, the text says: Starting equipment for characters above 1st level is entirely at your discretion, since you give out treasure at your own pace. That said, you can use the Starting Equipment table as a guide. The table is divided into four tiers of levels (matching the tiers described ...


20

I used to play The Dark Eye (Das Schwarze Auge) myself and in my opinion it strongly resembles medieval Europe - apart from the obvious fantasy additions. It's rule books give information of the economy, trade and demography of nearly everything. Therefore the dilemma is quite understandable; in medieval Europe a sword was worth a fortune and in the world ...


20

Different laborers This is likely the difference between an employed laborer (the equivalent of a construction worker) and the "odd jobs" laborer. Practicing a Profession downtime (PHB 187) yields the modest lifestyle expected. In the US we see statistics like this: General laborer median wages = $15 per hour (Google search) This is a moderate lifestyle ...


19

D&D is not an economic simulator 5th edition least of all, given its deliberate choice to avoid valuing consistency or coherence in mechanics. Labor prices have always been a problem in D&D, whether the exorbitant prices charged by sages and the like in the earliest editions or the never-high-enough price for a sellsword. The fundamental problem is ...


18

The free spells in a wizard's spellbook aren't wealth for that wizard In the same way that a paladin's special mount isn't a factor when computing the paladin's wealth by level, neither is a wizard's free spells from becoming (and advancing as) a wizard a factor when computing the wizard's wealth by level. These are merely class features—benefits gained ...


17

Ignore the WBL Chart at your own risk Especially if you’re going under. The WBL tables are a suggestion, but changing WBL and ignoring the tables is an extremely dangerous thing to do within the mathematics of 3.x. Few things are as broad in their scope. Changing wealth affects every character in the world, or at least every player character, and can ...


17

It's a major decision not to be made lightly D&D 3.5's power curve is strongly influenced by wealth. A character with magic items is obviously much more powerful than a character without, and to an equal extent a character with level 15 items is probably going to kick the face of a character with level 5 items regardless of what level the characters ...


17

In Basic D&D (BECMI), The Republic of Darokin (GAZ11) has a Level of Government Participation table on page 10: \$\begin{array}{|r|l|} \hline \textbf{Total Worth (in daros)} & \textbf{Allowed Position} \\ \hline \text{under }\,15,000 & \text{Non-voting Citizen} \\ 15,000 & \text{Voting Citizen} \\ 25,000 & \text{Local Office} \\ 75,000 ...


16

Upon re-reading the PHB inspired by David Coffron's answer and Phil Boncer's answer, I think I actually found the answer to this question. The numbers as written fit perfectly in the PHB without any hand-waving at all. The confusion comes from different uses of the word "laborer" in different places. Essentially, based on the text, there seem to be three ...


16

You can convert mundane objects into something more valuable at resale You've discovered the primary issue in selling treasure that the PHB covers on page 144: As a general rule, undamaged weapons, armor, and other equipment fetch half their cost when sold in a market. Weapons and armor used by monsters are rarely in good enough condition to sell. With ...


16

The general guidelines make no mention of the Item Creation Feats, but I'll quote it for completeness: Characters should spend no more than half their total wealth on any single item. For a balanced approach, PCs that are built after 1st level should spend no more than 25% of their wealth on weapons, 25% on armor and protective devices, 25% on other magic ...


15

There is no rule inconsistency; it is a disconnect between game logic and real-life experience. D&D is not a reality simulator; its mechanics are abstracted and --as you've noticed-- the value of things are proportionate to their use in adventuring rather than the difficulty in making them or the value of their component parts. While many people play D&...


15

Level Them Up In early versions of D&D, characters would earn experience points for gold pieces gained. Although this wasn’t the most popular rule, it did serve a useful function: it brought characters’ innate powers “along for the ride” with sudden material success. In this way, it helped keep the game balanced. Right now, you have a 6th level party ...


14

I see no problem. Let's assume the characters are not essentially rich, they just have very valuable equipment. They could have stolen it, found it, or rewarded with it. Apart from that, they don't need to be very rich. If they want to trade their equipment for a cheaper one and buy a house or a farm (if they can), let them have it. On the other hand, ...


14

Unlikely to be the highest possible, but the highest typical 20th-level ability score, assuming you’re focusing on it, is 36: 18 base +2 racial +5 from levels +6 from enhancement bonuses +5 from wish or a manual For mental scores, there is also the +3 bonus you can receive for being venerable. These usually come with a −6 penalty to all physical ...


14

About WBL, what it does or doesn’t do for you WBL is a measure of expectation, the expectations the designers had for items and wealth. These expectations affect other aspects of the game—perhaps most notably monster design. Monster save DCs account for cloaks of resistance, their own save bonuses account for the ability-score-enhancing headbands, and so on....


13

OK, decided to look into this. There are no nice, neat tables that I can find. That said, the actual information does appear to be available, excepting for the Wu Jen. Complete Adventurer is the most straight-forward: it’s included in each class’s entry as Starting Gold. Complete Warrior neglected starting wealth entirely, but it’s ...


13

Let them, so long as it makes coherent sense in the world. In a sandbox game, the players are just one group in a larger world. Your job is to run the world, which means you're going to be fairly reactive to what the players are doing. If they want to hunt dire boars, let them. Stopping them would require a good reason here. Maybe at some point you throw a ...


13

Welcome back to the game! I'd like to answer your question in two different parts: the mechanics and the ascetics. Mechanics I think there is a core misconception here: balanced against typical adventure tropes of killing monsters, taking all their stuff and becoming a wandering one-man magical army. which I think comes from your background with 1e and ...


13

Usually this sort of problem can be solved by making the encounters larger. Instead of fighting three CR2 giant boars, make them fight six CR2 giant boars -- et cetera, et cetera. Usually when I do this, I adjust the combat difficulty dynamically: if the first three monsters go down too fast, I tell the players that three more were hiding in the bushes. ...


12

So first of all, the poison list isn't meant to list "anything that could be poisonous if ingested," which includes a lot of stuff, but things that are useful as proper poisons (subtle, easy to deliver, etc.). Compare solanine (the stuff in potatoes) to arsenic (which is listed on the poison table) - not only is it less than half as poisonous (requiring ...


12

You are letting your players get the drop on you. They are being spoiled chummers that only want the low hanging golden fruit. Ain't no such thing in the streets. And if a bunch of blokes is just too greedy, you can bet Johnson's time will be best spent hiring the next gang of street thugs over there. Let'em starve. Also, their street rep will take a ...


11

You should certainly let them do what they like After all, that is the point of a sandbox game. Railroading is bad in general but particularly for a sandbox. Besides, the most lucrative business in Dungeons & Dragons is adventuring. If you look at the Craft, Perform, and Profession skills, even astronomical DCs still result in paltry income compared ...


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