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68

The relevant rules are Wild Shape on pages 66 - 67: You automatically revert if you fall unconscious, drop to 0 hit points, or die. ... If you revert as a result of dropping to 0 hit points, any excess damage carries over to your normal form. For example, if you take 10 damage in animal form and have only 1 hit point left, you revert and take 9 ...


55

By RAW, the Druid dies. Wild Shape protects you from a few specific things: When you revert to your normal form, you revert to the number of hit points you had before you transformed (and then take overflow damage). If you revert and have hitpoints remaining in caster form, you don't fall unconscious as a result of being reduced to 0 hit points. Finger of ...


51

Druids have been shapeshifters from the beginning The D&D Druid ability to shapechange showed up originally in their first appearance in the game, as a monster in the Greyhawk supplement for original D&D. At that time, they were known as "priests of a neutral-type religion", had both cleric and magic-user spellcasting, and had "barbaric followers". ...


42

Note the uses of the word Beasts in the description of what Wild Shape does. Beasts is a defined term; from page 2 of the Dungeon Master Basic Rules: Beasts are nonhumanoid creatures that are a natural part of the fantasy ecology. Some of them have magical powers, but most are unintelligent and lack any society or language. Beasts include all ...


40

Like most other answers, I would say yes, two shapeshifts in a combat is legit; no, you did not make a mistake by allowing your player to wolf out and; no, you shouldn't try to claw back the ability. One thing I would add to the previous answers is that this issue will almost certainly balance itself out fairly soon. Yes, a CR 1 creature in a level 2 party ...


37

Yes, the rules stop this simply by how the ability works. The ability just doesn't provide any way to choose two forms. It specifies one ("a beast that you have seen"). Without something giving a druid the ability to meld beast forms, the druid had as much ability to shift into a hybrid form as a random peasant does — none.


35

The phrase "gain the ability" means that it doesn't replace anything. In addition to your previous ability to wild shape as an action, you now also have the ability to wild shape as a bonus action. If it had been "your wild shape ability now takes a bonus action, rather than a normal action" you'd lose the ability to wildshape as an action, but this is ...


35

No, but you still keep that bonus for Wild Shape. Each class has a section called Features, that lists all its class features. These include, for a Barbarian, Rage, Unarmored Defense, Reckless Attack, Danger Sense, etc. The Proficiency Bonus is not listed there. Chapter 7 of the PHB describes it as Proficiency Bonus: Characters have a proficiency bonus ...


35

No A class feature might give you a spell, but it explicitly says so in this case. See Barbarian's Path of the Totem Warrior for example: At 3rd level when you adopt this path, you gain the ability to cast the beast sense and speak with animals spells. A spell is a special term in 5e, a spell description always says its casting time, components, ...


33

Yes. First off, let's note that there's nothing in the Druid description that specifically precludes the WS1 → WS2 transformation you're contemplating. Second, consider this line of "Wild Shape": You retain the benefit of any features from your class... and can use them if the new form is physically capable of doing so. Wild shaping is a ...


31

Yes, truesight will see through Wild Shape. As you mentioned in the question, truesight can perceive the original form of a creature transformed by magic. And the first line of Wild Shape says that: Starting at 2nd level, you can use your action to magically assume the shape of a beast that you have seen before. So Wild Shape is a magical transformation, ...


31

Lack of specific rules means DM have to decide. Despite lacking an appropriate excerpt from the books, we can at least refer to the designer's intent in a close situation, as expressed by Jeremy Crawford on Twitter (Courtesy of Rubiksmoose): Wild Shape can introduce wild situations. What happens when someone swallows a druid in a Tiny form? Is a druid ...


30

A druid can only assume the shape of a beast. Any combination of two animals would be a monstrosity. Beasts include “all variety of ordinary animals” (MM p. 6) while “Monstrosities are monsters in the strictest sense—frightening creatures that are not ordinary, not truly natural.” (MM p. 6) Even more to the point, later on the same page: Some [...


30

RAW, you are dead Xanathar's Guide to Everything states you move 500 feet in the first round* of falling. If you fall anything between 200 and 499 feet, you take 20d6 damage, and don't have time for Wild Shape. Your DM can save you Based on your question, your DM is willing to let you use Wild Shape while falling. Dire Wolf is not enough, you will need ...


30

On a literal reading, no Corpses are objects. Jeremy Crawford has unofficially advised as much on Twitter: A non-undead corpse isn't considered a creature. It's effectively an object. And see Is a dead creature's body considered an "object"? which addresses this. A beast is a type of creature. So, having seen an animal's corpse, you haven'...


29

Unfortunately, there are no rules for this circumstance, so if our itsy-bitsy-spider-druid runs out of Wild Shape while trying to climb up a downspout, we have to come up with a ruling, and there are three routes here: The generous route is to let the druid stay shaped until they exit the downspout (or other space that can't fit their humanoid form at all), ...


29

No, you must choose a beast Wildshape (PHB, 66) dictates: Starting at 2nd level, you can use your action to magically assume the shape of a beast that you have seen before. A Werewolf (MM, 211) states that they are a Humanoid and therefore not eligible for Wild Shape.


29

You've already answered your own question. Wild shape isn't a spell nor a magic item, so feeblemind doesn't stop a druid from doing it. Furthermore, Feeblemind doesn't lower Wisdom, which is both the primary attribute for druids and a mental attribute most beasts have bonuses to (as opposed to Intelligence, which is not more than 2, and Charisma, which is ...


29

Capstones (level 20 class features) are meant to be very powerful Lets start with your first concern, while a 2-infinity chart would be silly looking for power progression the level 20 class features are all very strong and meant to showcase the player and character at the height of their abilities within the world. A level 20 druid can Wild Shape as much ...


28

Your player is perfectly justified in doing this. The Spider is a Tiny beast listed on page 44 of the DM Basic Rules (v0.3), or page 337 of the Monster Manual. It's CR 0, so the Druid is free to Wild Shape into it at any level (except 1st, obviously; they have to have Wild Shape). It should be noted that there are a large number of things that eat spiders, ...


28

There are no rules that state that a wild shaped druid is not able to take or benefit from a short rest. There is a clearly defined list of what they cannot do in the PHB. As there is no requirement to maintain concentration or focus on the shape, and because transforming does not break concentration on existing spells, a druid is able to meet the ...


28

Feats, generally, aren't supplanted by beast statistics. (Though your ability to make use of them may be supplanted.) Alert and Lucky, specifically, still apply in their entirety. Your game statistics are replaced by the statistics of the beast. (PHB p.67) To see what is supplanted or augmented, take a look at beasts' statistics. ("Statistic," as a ...


28

The extraction can't be done Both Polymorph and Wild Shape tell their target to assume the new form's game statistics, which includes (Monster Manual, page 6) the creature's type (Humanoid, Beast, Fiend, et cetera). A PC is usually humanoid, but if they use Wild Shape or Polymorph, their creature type can change. The Mind Flayer's brain extraction action ...


27

Yes, this would be unbalanced. Firstly, consider what Wild Shape gives you. It is a single ability that gives: Unlimited flight Unlimited water breathing and swimming A huge pool of temporary hit points Multiattack before the Fighter even has their Extra Attack ability The ability to have good physical stats without investing in them The ability to have ...


27

No. A druid can only wildshape on his turn. So, while he can apply unlimited hitpoints to his form by wildshaping every turn, he cannot prevent you from dealing damage when it isn't his turn. If the druid is knocked out of his form (reduced to 0 hp), the first thing that happens is the excess damage carries over. But now he's essentially vulnerable until ...


27

Sure, a giant spider can be a mount. Here is what the Player's Handbook says about the eligibility of a mount in the Mounted Combat section (p. 198): A willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount. The giant spider is Large size, and humanoids are Medium size, so the size restriction ...


26

Raging while in Wild Shape Wild Shape explicitly allows this. From PHB p 67: You retain the benefit of any features from your class, race, or other source and can use them if the new form is physically capable of doing so. If a bear is physically incapable of flying into a primal Rage, then we are doing something very wrong as a society. Using Wild ...


26

Yes you can The rules for wildshape clearly state that you retain any benefits of features from your race if the new form is capable of using them. Since the Relentless Endurance feature does not implicitly or explicitly require any particular body parts (hands, for example) I see no reason why it should not be retained. The rule on reverting says you ...


26

You got the basic rules right. See also this linked question, there is no lower limit to the size. So, let's move on to the second question: why isn't it overpowered? Let's go over your ideas, and see what we get. Escape from any ropes and chains. Yep, totally feasible. The advantage here is that you can escape in a single Action, whereas it takes the ...


26

This sounds like a clever way to avoid an Attack of Opportunity. The Druid is not moving, merely using a magical effect to take up less space. This is less "moving" than teleport, which expressly does not trigger an AoO. The druid has used a bonus action, and has not expended any part of their Speed. Also consider that the druid has expended one of his or ...


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